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How do I convert from excel serial date to a .NET date time?

For example 39938 is 05/05/2009.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 26 down vote accepted

Where 39938 is the number of days since 1/1/1900?

In that case, use this function (C#):

public static DateTime FromExcelSerialDate(int SerialDate)
{
    if (SerialDate > 59) SerialDate -= 1; //Excel/Lotus 2/29/1900 bug   
    return new DateTime(1899, 12, 31).AddDays(SerialDate);
}

VB:

Public Shared Function FromExcelSerialDate(ByVal SerialDate As Integer) As DateTime
    If SerialDate > 59 Then SerialDate -= 1 ''// Excel/Lotus 2/29/1900 bug
    Return New DateTime(1899, 12, 31).AddDays(SerialDate)
End Function

[Update]:
Hmm... A quick test of that shows it's actually two days off. Not sure where the difference is.

Okay: problem fixed now. See the comments for details. Especially see the recommendation to use DateTime.FromOADate() instead.

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1  
I know 1 day is for Lotus having a bug about 02/29/1900 it had it as a day that doesn't exist. I don't know what the other day is. –  David Basarab Apr 7 '09 at 20:42
2  
I think you get 2 days too much with this conversion, i.e. the epoch date would have to be moved back to DateTime(1899, 12, 30). This is due to Excel's leap year bug I assume. –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Apr 7 '09 at 20:43
1  
Oops, everyone else was faster ;-) And yes, the bug originally comes from Lotus as Joel explained: joelonsoftware.com/items/2006/06/16.html –  Dirk Vollmar - 0xA3 Apr 7 '09 at 20:45
9  
-1 for duplicating what is already solved in the .NET Framework (DateTime.FromOADate). –  Andreas Huber May 1 '12 at 9:22
3  
For more info on FromOADate, see msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  JDB Nov 5 '12 at 17:46

I find it simpler using FromOADate method, for example:

DateTime dt = DateTime.FromOADate(39938);

Using this code dt is "05/05/2009".

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4  
+1 This seems much more elegant than the other answers... –  Daniel Fortunov May 18 '10 at 16:38
2  
This also handles dates with time values (floating point in the underlying data format), which the accepted solution does not. –  nullptr Jun 17 '10 at 19:56
    
@nullptr However, it has a precision of only 1 millisecond. You can get a much higher precision if you care. See my answer elsewhere. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Dec 17 '12 at 21:15

Much simpler to use DateTime.FromOADate(double);

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void ExcelSerialDateToDMY(int nSerialDate, int &nDay, 
                          int &nMonth, int &nYear)
{
    // Excel/Lotus 123 have a bug with 29-02-1900. 1900 is not a
    // leap year, but Excel/Lotus 123 think it is...
    if (nSerialDate == 60)
    {
        nDay    = 29;
        nMonth    = 2;
        nYear    = 1900;

        return;
    }
    else if (nSerialDate < 60)
    {
        // Because of the 29-02-1900 bug, any serial date 
        // under 60 is one off... Compensate.
        nSerialDate++;
    }

    // Modified Julian to DMY calculation with an addition of 2415019
    int l = nSerialDate + 68569 + 2415019;
    int n = int(( 4 * l ) / 146097);
            l = l - int(( 146097 * n + 3 ) / 4);
    int i = int(( 4000 * ( l + 1 ) ) / 1461001);
        l = l - int(( 1461 * i ) / 4) + 31;
    int j = int(( 80 * l ) / 2447);
     nDay = l - int(( 2447 * j ) / 80);
        l = int(j / 11);
        nMonth = j + 2 - ( 12 * l );
    nYear = 100 * ( n - 49 ) + i + l;
}

Cut and Paste of someone elses talents...

Ian Brown

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