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Some functions which calculate booleans:

bool a()
{
   return trueorfalse;
}

bool b()
{
   //...
}

bool c()
{
   //...
}

This condition

//somewhere else
if((a()&&b()&&c()) || (a()&&b()&&!c()) )
{
    doSomething();
}

can also be written as

if(a()&&b())
{
   doSomething();
}

Will compilers usually optimize this away?

And what about pure boolean values:

if((a&&b&&c) || (a&&b&&!c))
{ 
   doSomething();
}
share|improve this question
4  
It can be written as that only knowing that the functions are pure functions. –  user166390 Sep 1 '11 at 18:25
    
I don't think so, unless it can prove that c returns the same result every call, and it would probably also have to try to inline c. –  Mooing Duck Sep 1 '11 at 18:25
2  
bool c() { static bool r=true; r = !r; return r;} for instance. –  Mooing Duck Sep 1 '11 at 18:26
    
If you had used variables instead of function calls then, yes, the compiler will optimize. –  mydogisbox Sep 1 '11 at 18:28
1  
I think it is worth trying to simplify it. If it is that complicated, how do you expect the reader of your code (including yourself) to be able to make sense of it later? Perhaps also try to extract the condition into a separate function / functions? –  UncleBens Sep 1 '11 at 19:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since the functions may have side effects, the conditional cannot be "optimized" in any way, since all the functions will have to be called (conditionally) in a well-defined manner.

If you do want optimization, you can assign the result to variables first:

const bool ba = a(), bb = b(), bc = c();

if (ba && bb && bc || ba && bb && !bc) { /* ... */ } // probably optimized to "ba && bb"

It's possible that constexpr functions introduced in C++11 will allow for optimization if they yield a constant expression, though, but I'm not sure.

You can even condense this down: In the following code, f() has to be called twice:

if (f() && false || f() && true)
{
  // ...
}
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No they won't. The reason why is that the optimization would be visible to the user because it would change the observable side effects. For example In your optimized version c() would never execute even though the user explicitly tried to do so. This can and will lead to bugs.

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1  
Also it is possible for a function to be side-effect free but still not pure, I believe. –  user166390 Sep 1 '11 at 18:27
    
But will compilers detect pure functions and optimize it away in that case? –  TravisG Sep 1 '11 at 18:27
    
@heishe What is a pure function and how do you detect it? Yes compilers will do optimizations, mostly through function inlining that can lead to a simplification of complex expressions. –  Let_Me_Be Sep 1 '11 at 18:31
    
@heishe i'm sure there are a subset of compilers which have an inherent notion of pure functions which will do this. It's certainly not a feature of most main stream compilers though. –  JaredPar Sep 1 '11 at 18:32

Since your premise a flawed, no, they won't.

(a()&&b()&&c()) || (a()&&b()&&!c()) definitely can't be rewritten as (a()&&b())

C (and C++) isn't a functional programming language (like Haskell).

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But the problem is that it can't be refactored in that way, generally speaking!

If any of the functions have side effects that change the result of c() then the second call would possibly return a different result from the first one.

Not only that, but due to short-circuit execution things could be muddied even further.

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Very often in C the return value of a function gives whether the function was executed successfully of not. For example calling a graphics routine, converting a file. Think how often you use pointers to change something external to the function. Or call another function that outputs something. As someone said this isn't functional programming.

If the compiler is able to determine that foo() changes and does nothing then it may by all means simplify it but I would NOT count on it.

Here is a very simple example

bool foo()
{
    std::cout << "this needs to be printed each time foo() is called, even though its called in a logical expression\n";
    return true;
}

int main()
{
    if ((foo() && !(foo()) || foo() && !(foo())))
        return 0;

    return 1;
}

Edit any boolean algebra of variables should be simplified.

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