Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have to open files one by one for reading in C/C++. The name of the files are in0, in1, in2, in3..... I tried to use preprocessor directive to create file names. i want something like.

for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    string inp_file="/path/"+"in"+APPEND(i);  //to generate /path/in1 etc
    open(inp_file);
}

where APPEND is a MACRO. Since

#define APP(i) i

can generate the value

#define APP(i) #i

can convert a token to string.
I am trying to combine them both in many ways but failed. How to get the desired result or is it even possible to get the such a result with macro?

share|improve this question
1  
Preprocessor alone cannot be used to implement any run-time functionality. It is not possible "to get the such a result with macro" alone. All you can do is to wrap some into-to-string conversion function into a macro, but there's not much sense in doing that. –  AnT Sep 1 '11 at 18:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Addendum to Vlad's answer -- if for some reason you're not able/willing to use Boost, you can accomplish what you want using standard C++ with the stringstream class:

#include <sstream>

void Foo() {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
        std::stringstream converter;
        converter << "/path/in" << i;
        open(converter.str());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for non-boost solution. –  user405725 Sep 1 '11 at 18:53
    
Well number of ups in Vlad Lazarenko's answer reflects boost to pretty standard. But i thing i am going to accept this answer as i don't need to update any of my libraries.(lazy me!!) Thanks!! –  Terminal Sep 1 '11 at 19:12

In your case, the variable i is not a compile-time constant and so it is impossible to use pre-processor or template specialization because the value is simply not known at a time of compilation. What you can do is convert integer into string - boost.lexical_cast is one of the easiest to use solutions:

for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    // Generate /path/in1 etc
    std::string inp_file = "/path/in"+ boost::lexical_cast<std::string>(i);
    open(inp_file);
}

If you happen to have a compiler with C++11 support, you could use std::to_string(). For example:

for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
    // Generate /path/in1 etc
    std::string inp_file = "/path/in" + std::to_string(i);
    open(inp_file);
}

Hope it helps. Good Luck!

share|improve this answer

If you're not using boost, try this:

namespace StringUtils
{
    // Converts any type which implements << to string (basic types are alright!)
    template<typename T>
    std::string StringUtils::toString(const T &t)
    {
       std::ostringstream oss;
       oss << t;
       return oss.str();
    }
}

Use it this way:

for(int i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    string inp_file="/path/"+"in"+ StringUtils::toString(i);  //to generate /path/in1 etc
    open(inp_file);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is almost what Boost does. +1 –  user405725 Sep 1 '11 at 18:52

Just an addition to the existing answers which are all great, if you are using a newer compiler and standard library, c++11 introduces std::to_string(). So you can write code like this:

for(int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
    string inp_file = "/path/in"+ std::to_string(i);
    open(inp_file);
}
share|improve this answer

The C solution is this :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
  int n =4;
  char nstr[12];
  sprintf(nstr, "%d", n);
  int nlen = strlen( nstr );


  const char *fd = "/path/in";
  char buff[ strlen(fd) + nlen + 1 ];

  sprintf( buff, "%s%d", fd, n );

  /* for testing */
  printf( "%s\n", buff );
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.