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I need to get the last 90 hired employees that were terminated for each of the last 4 weeks. It's a rolling report.

The employee table is like so:

id      hired_date       term_date
3        07/1/2011        09/01/2011
4        07/18/2011        NULL    (NULL means still active) 
5        01/20/2009       08/23/2011
6        05/30/2011       8/22/2011
7        7/20/2011        7/23/2011

The report would be in this format. Id #4,5 would be ignored since #4 is still active and #5 was hired before the 90 day period.

Week ending     Terminated employees hired within past 90 days
09/03/2011        2   --(id 3,7)
8/27/2011         2   --(id 6,7)
..
..
  • So the first row for 9/03 is the number of terminated employees hired within the past 90 days of 9/03/2011 (going back to 06/05/2011). This doesn't include id #6 because employee was hired before 6/05.
  • The second row for 8/27 week is the same but from the range of 8/27 to 5/29.

I have a date table but it only contains week_start_date, week_end_date, and week_number. Do I need to create one that contains the 90 day periods?

I'm stuck how I can do this for only employees within the past 90 days and then calculate that for each of the past 4 weeks.

SQL Server 2008

edit: I think I'm close. I'm testing it right now. All_termed_employees is a listing of terminated employees within any date range. The weeks table now contains the ninety_begin_date and ninety_end_date for each week associated with it.

select wk.ninety_end, count(h.id)
FROM @weeks wk
LEFT JOIN all_termed_employees h 
    ON h.hire_date <= wk.ninety_end and h.hire_date >= wk.ninety_begin
          and .termination_date <= wk.ninety_end AND h.termination_date >= wk.ninety_begin
ORDER BY d.id
GROUP BY wk.ninety_end
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted
;WITH n(n) AS 
      -- just 4 rows - makes it easy to extend to 5 weeks, 6 weeks, etc.
      ( SELECT 0 UNION ALL SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 2 UNION ALL SELECT 3 ),

d(dt) AS
      -- single row with the end of the current week
      -- this could be a variable but I get a lot of flack for not inlining
      ( SELECT dt = CONVERT(DATE, DATEADD(DAY, 
          7-DATEPART(WEEKDAY, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP), CURRENT_TIMESTAMP))),

w(dt) AS 
      -- get the end of each week based on the rows in n
      ( SELECT DATEADD(WEEK, -n.n, d.dt) FROM n CROSS JOIN d )

SELECT 
    w.dt, SUM(CASE 
    WHEN e.term_date >= DATEADD(DAY, -90, w.dt) 
    AND e.term_date  <  DATEADD(DAY, 1,   w.dt) 
    AND e.hired_date >= DATEADD(DAY, -90, w.dt) 
    AND e.hired_date <  DATEADD(DAY, 1,   w.dt)  
    THEN 1 ELSE 0 END)
FROM dbo.Employees AS e
CROSS JOIN w
GROUP BY w.dt
ORDER BY w.dt DESC; 
share|improve this answer
    
@Aaron_Bertrand Thank you for those edits. It made it much clearer for me. And yes, this does appear to do what I need. By w.[start], do you mean w.[dt]? – James Sep 1 '11 at 19:46
    
Yes, corrected, sorry. I originally planned to use the [start] of the week, and changed in-flight. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 1 '11 at 19:52
    
Is there a particular reason to use CTEs over temp tables? I generally use temp tables when I need to do some preliminary manipulation/calculation that I want to draw upon...I'm wondering if there's any good reason to use CTEs in their place. Thanks. – Chris Sep 1 '11 at 21:49
    
Just that it makes it one statement rather than a bunch of different steps, and if I don't have to create a #temp table just to write 4 rows, why bother? I often revert to #temp tables if I do have extensive processing to do on the rows first or if I come across issues where the CTE can't be optimized correctly (have sene plenty of those cases). For CTEs with constants, I prefer the above over #temp tables 100:1. Like I said in the comment, I get flack for declaring variables sometimes too, but in production code I would probably do that instead of having the CTE called d... – Aaron Bertrand Sep 1 '11 at 21:57
    
Sorry for continuing off-topic, but why do you get a lot of flak of flak for not inlining? Is it for performance issues? Thank you – James Sep 2 '11 at 18:29

How about something like this?

EMP simulates your employee table. The PAST_FOUR_WEEKS is a simple 4 row in-memory table that identifies the reporting periods. I then calculate the difference between hire and term date and if it's less than or equal to 90, we count it as 1 (threshold met) or 0). I then sum all the threshold's met for the given time period

; WITH EMP (id, hired_date, term_date) AS
(
    select 3, CAST('2011-07-01' AS datetime), CAST('2011-09-01' AS datetime)
    union all select 4, '2011-06-18', null
    union all select 5, '01/20/2009','08/23/2011'
    union all select 6, '05/30/2011','8/22/2011'
    union all select 7, '7/20/2011','7/23/2011'
)
, PAST_FOUR_WEEKS (period, period_rank) AS
(
    -- magic goes here to determine end of week
    SELECT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP, 1
    UNION ALL SELECT dateadd(week, -1, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) , 2
    UNION ALL SELECT dateadd(week, -2, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) , 3
    UNION ALL SELECT dateadd(week, -3, CURRENT_TIMESTAMP) , 4
)
, HIRED_TERMED_DIFF AS
(
    SELECT
        *
    ,   DATEDIFF(d, E.hired_date, coalesce(E.term_date, '9999-12-31T23:59:59.997')) AS duration
    ,   CASE WHEN DATEDIFF(d, E.hired_date, coalesce(E.term_date, '9999-12-31T23:59:59.997')) < 91 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS threshold_met
    FROM
        EMP E 
)
SELECT
    PFW.period
,   SUM(HTD.threshold_met) AS [Terminated employees hired within past 90 days]
FROM 
    PAST_FOUR_WEEKS PFW
    LEFT OUTER JOIN
        HIRED_TERMED_DIFF HTD
        ON HTD.hired_date BETWEEN DATEADD(day, -90, PFW.period) AND PFW.period
GROUP BY
    PFW.period
ORDER BY
    1 DESC
,   2

Sample output

period                    Terminated employees hired within past 90 days
2011-09-01 14:46:29.243   2
2011-08-25 14:46:29.243   3
2011-08-18 14:46:29.243   3
2011-08-11 14:46:29.243   3
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is very helpful. But the termination count should only list those that were hired in the past 90 days and also termed in the past 90 days (hired and terminated within the same date range). So it should not count someone that was hired in 2009 and termed recently. I think your query counts those when it shouldn't? – James Sep 1 '11 at 19:17
1  
@James I think it would help for clarification if you include a few more rows of sample data and indicate why each row should or should not count for each week. I think that my query captures your requirement but only you can tell us for sure because we don't know what's in your table and what you expect the answer to be. – Aaron Bertrand Sep 1 '11 at 19:29

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