Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Usually I feel pretty confident with SQL queries, however this one has me scratching my head. I feel like this -should- be a quick fix, but I'm just not seeing it.

I'm trying to do a count on multiple values on the same table, in one query.

Don't mind the "0000000000000000" it's just representing an empty byte array.

Is there an easy way to combine these queries?

SELECT COUNT(ssn)
FROM patients
WHERE ssn="0000000000000000";

SELECT COUNT(firstname)
FROM patients
WHERE firstname="0000000000000000"

SELECT COUNT(lastname)
FROM patients
WHERE lastname="0000000000000000"

etc...
share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do something like this -

SELECT COUNT(ssn) AS patient_count, 'ssn' AS count_type
FROM patients
WHERE ssn="0000000000000000";
UNION
SELECT COUNT(firstname) AS patient_count, 'firstname' AS count_type
FROM patients
WHERE firstname="0000000000000000"
UNION
SELECT COUNT(lastname) AS patient_count, 'lastname' AS count_type
FROM patients
WHERE lastname="0000000000000000"
share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way I can then pivot the table? I mean it would be nicer to have my tiles as headers, not values. –  theangryhornet Sep 1 '11 at 19:57
2  
You could put UNION ALL instead of UNION, just to save the SQL server a bit of redundant work. –  James Sep 1 '11 at 19:57
add comment
SELECT SUM(CASE WHEN ssn = '0000000000000000' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS ssn_count,
       SUM(CASE WHEN firstname = '0000000000000000' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS first_count,
       SUM(CASE WHEN lastname = '0000000000000000' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS last_count
    FROM patients
    WHERE ssn = '0000000000000000'
        OR firstname = '0000000000000000'
        OR lastname = '0000000000000000'
share|improve this answer
    
That's pretty darned cool. How do you think it compares in performance to the "union" solutions below? –  Marvo Sep 1 '11 at 19:51
3  
@Marvo: My standard answer is try both and compare. I'd assume this would be better as it's 1 select vs. 3. –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 1 '11 at 19:53
    
very interesting approach! –  theangryhornet Sep 1 '11 at 19:54
1  
I guess it depends on how it gets executed; e.g. it might be one full table scan, rather than three index range scans, which could be very different, depending on the table contents. –  James Sep 1 '11 at 20:01
    
Thanks, @Joe. I wonder if you'd be guaranteed a table scan with this solution, or if it could make effective use of indexes. So yeah, performance might be situation dependent. Still, very cool. –  Marvo Sep 1 '11 at 20:01
show 1 more comment

Try with UNION

SELECT COUNT(ssn)
FROM patients
WHERE ssn="0000000000000000";
UNION
SELECT COUNT(firstname)
FROM patients
WHERE firstname="0000000000000000"
UNION    
SELECT COUNT(lastname)
FROM patients
WHERE lastname="0000000000000000"
share|improve this answer
2  
You'd want to use UNION ALL here. If two (or even all three) counts happen to be the same, UNION would eliminate them as duplicates. –  Joe Stefanelli Sep 1 '11 at 19:55
    
Not sure if I like this one, as you can't distinguish which counts are which. –  theangryhornet Sep 1 '11 at 19:55
    
you could put another column with the description to solve this –  Vitor Furlanetti Sep 1 '11 at 19:58
add comment

I guess this would work?

SELECT *
FROM
(SELECT COUNT(ssn) AS ssn_count
 FROM patients
 WHERE ssn="0000000000000000") AS ssn
CROSS JOIN
(SELECT COUNT(firstname) AS firstname_count
 FROM patients
 WHERE firstname="0000000000000000") AS firstname
CROSS JOIN
(SELECT COUNT(lastname) AS lastname_count
 FROM patients
 WHERE lastname="0000000000000000") AS lastname
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.