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I've been trying to sort an i18n translations YAML file with Ruby so I can manage new translations in a better and organized way, but I've been wondering if there is something to ease the task.

I found a YAML file writer so I can write a hash into a file, but my problem is to sort the hash correctly. If I got hash h, h.sort returns an array and I still haven't figured a simple way to do that.

I have YAML files like this:

pt-br:    
  global:
    misc:
      total: "Total"
      all: "Todos"
      close: "Fechar"
      cancel: "Cancelar"

    crud:
      access: "Acessar"
      back: "Voltar"
      edit: "Editar"
      confirm: "Confirmar"
      send: "Enviar"

...

(The files are way larger than this)

But I want to sort them this way:

pt-br:    
  global:
    crud:
      access: "Acessar"
      back: "Voltar"
      confirm: "Confirmar"
      edit: "Editar"
      send: "Enviar"

    misc:
      all: "Todos"
      cancel: "Cancelar"
      close: "Fechar"          
      total: "Total"

I thought that some simple recursive method could help me like this:

def translation_sort(h)
  if h.class == Hash
    h = h.sort
    h.each{|item| translation_sort(item)}
  end
  h
end

require "yaml"
h=YAML.load_file(File.open("~/pt-br.sample.yml"))
translation_sort(h)
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Actually this is a nice question. You want to deep sort hashes. So I don't like to re-invent the wheel and then I searched for a good implementation and I found one I like. Take a look at it https://gist.github.com/1083930. It works fine.

share|improve this answer
    
it worked, thanks lucapette! –  AndreDurao Sep 15 '11 at 20:02
    
This solution has quite a glitch: it also sorts values. –  Ando Nov 13 '12 at 21:04
    
I love this solution but there is no double-quotes in my Yaml file (it looks like this: sub_diagnostics_count: ! '# Sous-diagnostics' which is still interpreted as String but looks bad). Is there any solution to correct that @lucapette ? –  MrYoshiji Apr 29 '13 at 20:01
    
answer to myself and other curious: See my answer below –  MrYoshiji Apr 8 '14 at 14:17

You shouldn't use the YAML library like suggested in the other answers. It will screw up the formatting of long string values, remove your comments and spit unreadable char escapes when you use accents and special characters (which you will, since you are doing i18n). Use this gem I created:

https://github.com/redealumni/i18n_yaml_sorter

It will only sort the lines on the file, so everything will remain the same way it was on the original yaml (your accents, the YAML construct you used to enter the strings, indentation, etc). It will work with deeply nested yamls and results are pretty solid. The gem includes tests and it's good for ruby 1.8 or 1.9.

It comes with a TextMate Bundle (Shift + Command + S) and a Rails rake task so you can sort the files easily and instantly in your editor. It's really fast.

To illustrate the difference:

Original:

  pt-BR:
    # Note how this is a nice way of inputing
    # paragraphs of text in YAML. 
    apples: >
      Maçãs são boas,
      só não coma 
      seus iPods!
    grapes: Não comemos elas.
    bananas: |
      Bananas são "legais":
        - Elas são <b> doces </b>.
        isto: não é chave

      Por isto todos gostam de bananas!

Results by YAML::dump :

  pt-BR: 
    apples: "Ma\xC3\xA7\xC3\xA3s s\xC3\xA3o boas, s\xC3\xB3 n\xC3\xA3o coma  seus iPods!\n"
    bananas: "Bananas s\xC3\xA3o \"legais\":\n  - Elas s\xC3\xA3o <b> doces </b>.\n  isto: n\xC3\xA3o \xC3\xA9 chave\n\n\ Por isto todos gostam de bananas!\n"
    grapes: "N\xC3\xA3o comemos elas."

Results by i18n_yaml_sorter:

  pt-BR:
    # Note how this is a nice way of inputing
    # paragraphs of text in YAML. 
    apples: >
      Maçãs são boas,
      só não coma 
      seus iPods!
    bananas: |
      Bananas são "legais":
        - Elas são <b> doces </b>.
        isto: não é chave

      Por isto todos gostam de bananas!
    grapes: Não comemos elas.
share|improve this answer
    
It seems interesting, I'll try it! Obrigado Bernardo. –  AndreDurao Dec 1 '11 at 16:10
    
I just tried this gem for sorting a config.yml file and it didn't work. The result was sorted BUT also different. –  Ando Nov 13 '12 at 18:31

https://gist.github.com/1083930 is not working as I expected. It deep-sorts NOT ONLY hash keys BUT ALSO hash values. In my use cases where deep sorting a hash is needed, the hash is always a tree where keys are labels and values are (sub)trees (if hashes) or leaves (otherwise). I need to deep-sort only the labels of trees.

I got this

before: {"a":[2,10,{"5":null,"1":null,"3":null}],"x":{"5":null,"1":null,"3":null},"a2":{"5":[2,10,5],"1":null,"3":null}}
after:  {"a":[2,10,{"5":null,"1":null,"3":null}],"a2":{"1":null,"3":null,"5":[2,10,5]},"x":{"1":null,"3":null,"5":null}}

with this

require 'active_support'

def deeply_sort_hash(object)
  return object unless object.is_a?(Hash)
  hash = RUBY_VERSION >= '1.9' ? Hash.new : ActiveSupport::OrderedHash.new
  object.each { |k, v| hash[k] = deeply_sort_hash(v) }
  sorted = hash.sort { |a, b| a[0].to_s <=> b[0].to_s }
  hash.class[sorted]
end
share|improve this answer

UPDATE April 2014:

Using Rails 3.2.13, Ruby 1.9.3p489:

I just used the i18n_yaml_sorter gem ( https://github.com/redealumni/i18n_yaml_sorter ).

Simply add to your Gemfile:

gem 'i18n_yaml_sorter', group: :development

Then run the rake task to sort your locales' files:

rake i18n:sort

Worked perfectly, even though the gem has been last authored 2 years ago. It took 5 minutes max.

share|improve this answer

In Ruby 1.8 hashes don't have a particular order, so you cannot just sort them.

You could monkey-patch/overwrite the to_yaml method of Hash like this:

#!/usr/local/bin/ruby -w

require 'yaml'

class Hash
  def to_yaml(opts = {})
    YAML::quick_emit(self, opts) do |out|
      out.map(taguri, to_yaml_style) do |map|
        keys.sort.each do |k|
          v = self[k]
          map.add(k, v)
        end
      end
    end
  end
end

dict = YAML.load($<.read)

puts dict.to_yaml

Of course, the exact details may depend on your version of YAML/Ruby. The example above is for Ruby 1.8.6.

share|improve this answer

Here's another alternative for anyone else who comes across this..

require 'yaml'

yaml = YAML.load(IO.read(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'example.yml')))

@yml_string = "---\n"

def recursive_hash_to_yml_string(hash, depth=0)
  spacer = ""
  depth.times { spacer += "  "}
  hash.keys.sort.each do |sorted_key|
    @yml_string += spacer + sorted_key + ": "
    if hash[sorted_key].is_a?(Hash)
      @yml_string += "\n"
      recursive_hash_to_yml_string(hash[sorted_key], depth+1)
    else
      @yml_string += "#{hash[sorted_key].to_s}\n"
    end
  end
end

recursive_hash_to_yml_string(yaml)

open(File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'example.yml'), 'w') { |f|
  f.write @yml_string
}
share|improve this answer

This may be another appealing option: https://github.com/redealumni/i18n_yaml_sorter

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Gordon! Thanks for your answer... This git repository is already included on the 2nd answer also. –  AndreDurao Jan 9 '14 at 16:45
    
Whoops, facepalm! –  Gordon Isnor Jan 9 '14 at 20:41

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