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Edit: There was some confusion, but I want to ask a general question about object oriented design in Python.

Consider a class that lets you map data values to counts or frequencies:

class DataMap(dict):
    pass

Now consider a subclass that allows you to construct a histogram from a list of data:

class Histogram(DataMap):
    def __init__(self, list_of_values):
        # 1. Put appropriate super(...) call here if necessary
        # 2. Build the map of values to counts in self
        pass

Now consider a class that lets you make a smoothed probability mass table rather than a Histogram.

class ProbabilityMass(DataMap):
    pass

What is the best way to allow a ProbabilityMass to be constructed from either a Histogram or a list of values?

I "grew up" programming in C++, and in this case I would use an overloaded constructor. In Python I've thought of doing this with:

  • The constructor takes multiple arguments (all but one of these should == None)
  • I define from_Histogram and from_list methods

In the second case (which I believe is better), what is the best way to allow the from_list method to use the shared code from the Histogram constructor? A ProbabilityMass table is nearly identical to a Histogram table, but it is scaled so that the sum of all value is 1.0.

If you have come across a similar problem, please share your expertise!

share|improve this question
    
Oliver, this question has been asked other times, although I'm having a hard time coming up with the right keywords to find them right now. Basically, use a staticmethod which calls the constructor as an alternate constructor. –  agf Sep 13 '11 at 20:00
    
@agf Should I define two static methods (ProbabilityMass.from_list and ProbabilityMass.from_histogram)? Or should one of them use the init method? Or maybe there is some "constructor overloading" machinery or standard I don't know about (perhaps this is what you mean by "alternate constructor")? –  Oliver Oct 2 '11 at 18:31
    
If one is clearly the "Default" / most generic one, use that as __init__. If neither is, you could pick one to be __init__, or you could just factor out the common code into __init__ and have both static methods call that after doing pre-processing. (Make sure to note in the docstring not to call the constructor directly). –  agf Oct 2 '11 at 18:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To start with, if you think you want @staticmethod, you almost always don't. Either the function is not part of the class, in which case it should just be a free function, or it is part of the class, but not tied to an instance, and it should be a @classmethod. Your named constructor is a good candidate for a @classmethod.

Also note that you should invoke A.__init__ from B via super(), otherwise multiple inheritance can bite you bad.

class A:
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.values_to_counts = {}
        for val in data:
            if val in self.values_to_counts:
                self.values_to_counts[val] += 1
            else:
                self.values_to_counts[val] = 1
    @classmethod
    def from_values_to_counts(cls, values_to_counts):
        self = cls([])
        self.values_to_counts = values_to_counts
        return self

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, data, parameter):
        super(B, self).__init__(data)
        self.parameter = parameter
    def print_parameter(self):
        print self.parameter

In this case, you don't need a B.from_values_to_counts, it inherits from A, and it will return an instance of B, since that's how it was called.

If you need to do more complex initialization in B, you can, using super(), which looks very similar to the way it would when you use it with instances. after all, a classmethod really isn't anything more complex than an instancemethod where the im_self attribute is assigned to the class itself.

class A:
    def __init__(self, data):
        self.values_to_counts = {}
        for val in data:
            if val in self.values_to_counts:
                self.values_to_counts[val] += 1
            else:
                self.values_to_counts[val] = 1
    @classmethod
    def from_values_to_counts(cls, values_to_counts):
        self = cls([])
        self.values_to_counts = values_to_counts
        return self

class B(A):
    def __init__(self, data, parameter):
        super(B, self).__init__(data)
        self.parameter = parameter
    def print_parameter(self):
        print self.parameter
    @classmethod
    def from_values_to_counts(cls, values_to_counts):
        self = super(B, cls).from_values_to_counts(values_to_counts)
        do_more_initialization(self)
        return self
share|improve this answer
    
Nice. Might want to add the missing return to from_values_to_counts (I know this is just an example, but don't want to mislead anyone). –  agf Sep 1 '11 at 20:38
    
"In this case, you don't need a B.from_values_to_counts, it inherits from A" I want a from_values_to_counts_and_parameter method. That method does two things (sets the values_to_counts variable and the parameter variable). I am aware of class methods (they're mentioned in the post); I was also hoping to address the problem in general. for a data structure like a probability mass table (which could be defined by a list of values or by a histogram), what is the best way to define constructors or static/class methods? –  Oliver Sep 1 '11 at 20:44
    
@agf: got that in my edit. and some other bits and bots. –  IfLoop Sep 1 '11 at 20:47
    
+1 @tokenmacguy class methods did the trick-- but it was quite tricky to decide what code to put where (init, class method 1, class method 2)! –  Oliver Oct 13 '11 at 1:43

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