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I am using a sql query such as WHERE name REGEXP '[[:<:]]something[[:>:]]'.

Now this all works great but my results are not ordered by number of matches found which is what I am looking for. Any ideas on how to go about doing this or if it is even possible?

Thanks

Full Query is

    SELECT `Item`.`id`, `Item`.`name`, `Item`.`short_bio`
    FROM `items` AS `Item`
    WHERE ((`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]hello[[:>:]]') OR
           (`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]world[[:>:]]')

Now this query is generated based on user input, each space breaks the thing into a different part that is searched for. I would like to order the results based on the number of matches of all parts, this way the most relevant results are on the top.

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You should provide your complete query if you want precise help. –  krtek Sep 1 '11 at 21:06
    
Number of matches to what? –  Nate C-K Sep 1 '11 at 21:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I found an UDF some time ago to do this. I'm really sorry I can't cite the source though.

DELIMITER //

CREATE DEFINER=`root`@`localhost` FUNCTION `substrCount`(s VARCHAR(255), ss VARCHAR(255)) RETURNS tinyint(3) unsigned
    READS SQL DATA
BEGIN
    DECLARE count TINYINT(3) UNSIGNED;
    DECLARE offset TINYINT(3) UNSIGNED;
    DECLARE CONTINUE HANDLER FOR SQLSTATE '02000' SET s = NULL;

    SET count = 0;
    SET offset = 1;

    REPEAT
        IF NOT ISNULL(s) AND offset > 0 THEN
            SET offset = LOCATE(ss, s, offset);
            IF offset > 0 THEN
                SET count = count + 1;
                SET offset = offset + 1;
            END IF;
        END IF;
    UNTIL ISNULL(s) OR offset = 0 END REPEAT;

    RETURN count;
END

DELIMITER ;

There's also a nifty solution found here.

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That nifty solution you posted a link for worked perfectly thanks a bunch. –  Bobbake4 Sep 1 '11 at 23:01
    
Also if your would like to rank them as using that function the replace call is case sensitive. Use this user made function to rank matches without case forge.mysql.com/tools/tool.php?id=132. –  Bobbake4 Sep 1 '11 at 23:55
    
@bobbake4 thanks for the feedback. I noticed the other solution is about 10 times faster than the UDF I posted. –  gilden Sep 9 '11 at 20:59

How about something like this (don't know mysql, so it may need tweaking):

SELECT `Item`.`id`, `Item`.`name`, `Item`.`short_bio`
FROM `items` AS `Item`
WHERE ((`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]hello[[:>:]]') OR
       (`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]world[[:>:]]')
ORDER BY (`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]hello[[:>:]]') +
         (`Item`.`name` REGEXP '[[:<:]]world[[:>:]]') DESC
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Regex matching operators in MySQL return either 1 or 0 depending on whether the match was found or not respectively (or null if either a pattern or string is null). No information about number of matches is available, so sorting is not possible either.

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