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I'm trying to create some structures in C# to mimic ones from some C++ Microsoft header files. My code is as follows:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
unsafe public struct _NotifyData
{
    fixed uint adwData[2];
    public struct Data
    {
        uint cbBuf;
        IntPtr pBuff;
    }
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA
{
    public ushort Type;
    public ushort Field;
    public uint Reserved;
    public uint Id;
    public _NotifyData NotifyData;
}

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
unsafe public struct PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO
{
    public uint Version;
    public uint Flags;
    public uint Count;
    fixed PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA aData[1];  //Compiler complains here!!!
}

The compiler complains about my aData[1] variable in my declaration of struct PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO. I've encountered a handfull of these and adding fixed to the variable in question and unsafe to the structure declaration seemed to work. Except for this structure that is. The error I get is this:

Fixed size buffer type must be one of the following: bool, byte, short, int, long, char, sbyte, ushort, uint, ulong, float or double

Now I can see that the type I'm using is not one of the listed types, but according to this, putting unsafe in front of the struct declaration should allow me to use types other than the ones listed. For some reason it is not letting me.

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3  
The page you link doesn't say anything about using unsafe to get rid of error. On the contrary, they give an example that would cause the error, and it uses unsafe. –  vhallac Sep 1 '11 at 21:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You just can't declare fixed-size array of custom structs in C#, as the error message and the page you linked to (I suggest you reread it) say.

EDIT: Removed incorrect info. See David Heffernan's answer for a way to solve this.

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I'm not your downvoter, but it is reasonably well deserved I am afraid. The problem is that aData is a variable length array and in fact there is no way other than manual marshalling to handle that. –  David Heffernan Sep 1 '11 at 22:19
    
@Ultratrunks I don't understand why you accepted this answer. What will you do when Count>1? Removing compiler errors is not enough, you also need the code to do the right thing at runtime. –  David Heffernan Sep 1 '11 at 22:33
    
Then the documentation is really confusing, because it is declared as an array of length 1. –  svick Sep 1 '11 at 22:34
    
I did re-read that Microsoft link msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2f5zx2bz%28v=vs.90%29.aspx. And right above the example it says "The following sample generates CS1663." And then gives a chunk of code where they try create an unsafe structure with a fixed array of type 'string'. The example was giving an example of something that DOES NOT work. Little confused there is all, thanks. –  Ultratrunks Sep 1 '11 at 22:34
    
@svick That's just how variable length arrays are declared in C structs. –  David Heffernan Sep 1 '11 at 22:35

I have a couple of suggestions.

First of all _NotifyData is a union and should look like this:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Explicit)]
public struct _NotifyData
{
    [FieldOffset(0), MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValArray, SizeConst=2)]
    public uint[] adwData;
    [FieldOffset(0)]
    public struct Data
    {
        uint cbBuf;
        IntPtr pBuff;
    }
}

Secondly, PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO simply can't be handled by the P/invoke marshaller. You will have to use manual marshalling, i.e. Marshal.PtrToStructure() to get anywhere. The documentation for the ppPrinterNotifyInfo parameter of FindNextPrinterChangeNotification() states:

A pointer to a pointer variable that receives a pointer to a system-allocated, read-only buffer. Call the FreePrinterNotifyInfo function to free the buffer when you are finished with it. This parameter can be NULL if no information is required.

You should pass an IntPtr as an out parameter and then use Marshal.PtrToStructure() to read out the contents into your own data structures. Something like this:

IntPtr PrinterNotifyInfo;
FindNextPrinterChangeNotification(..., out PrinterNotifyInfo);
IntPtr pCount = PrinterNotifyInfo + 2*Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(uint));
uint Count = (uint)Marshal.ReadInt32(pCount);
IntPtr pData = pCount + Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(uint));
for (int i=0; i<Count; i++)
{
    PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA Data = (PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA)Marshal.PtrToStructure(pData, typeof(PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA));
    pData += Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(PRINTER_NOTIFY_INFO_DATA));
}

I've not attempted to compile this but hopefully it gets the idea across.

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I'm working in legacy code for a product I didn't develop, and later in the code this exact marshaling that you show here is going on. I was just trying to go against the grain, and in my mind more correctly defining the structures. I should have just left it alone though. –  Ultratrunks Sep 1 '11 at 22:39
    
Variable length C arrays in structs have to be marshalled the way I demonstrate here. The only potential candidate is UnmanagedType.ByValArray but that doesn't work because it has to be used with SizeConst and you don't know that at compile time. –  David Heffernan Sep 1 '11 at 22:40

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