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I'm trying to figure out how to detect the type of credit card based purely on its number. Does anyone know of a definitive, reliable way to find this?

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1  
Using a regular expression. Check out this link for more information. –  senfo Sep 16 '08 at 14:18
    
This wikipedia article may be helpful in your search: Credit Card Numbers It looks like there are some standard prefixes that are used which could determine what the card type is. –  Craig Sep 16 '08 at 14:19
2  
The details are all on Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Credit_card_numbers –  Sten Vesterli Sep 16 '08 at 14:20
1  
There's a good summary table in Wikipedia, at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Credit_card_numbers. It's the first one to six digits that tell the type and issuer of the card. –  Alex Sep 16 '08 at 14:20
2  
I wouldn't use a regex other than to pull out the first numeric group, you can generally tell just from the first 4 numbers (in the US). Also before bothering to pay for clearing a charge run a Mod 10 checksum on the card number to make sure it could be legitimate. Luhn algorithm –  Dan Blair Sep 16 '08 at 14:25

16 Answers 16

The credit/debit card number is referred to as a PAN, or Primary Account Number. The first six digits of the PAN are taken from the IIN, or Issuer Identification Number, belonging to the issuing bank (IINs were previously known as BIN — Bank Identification Numbers — so you may see references to that terminology in some documents). These six digits are subject to an international standard, ISO/IEC 7812, and can be used to determine the type of card from the number.

Unfortunately the actual ISO/IEC 7812 database is not publicly available, however there are unofficial lists, both commercial and free, including on Wikipedia.

Anyway, to detect the type from the number, you can use a regular expression like the ones below: Credit for original expressions

Visa: ^4[0-9]{6,}$ Visa card numbers start with a 4.

MasterCard: ^5[1-5][0-9]{5,}$ MasterCard numbers start with the numbers 51 through 55, but this will only detect MasterCard credit cards; there are other cards issued using the MasterCard system that do not fall into this IIN range.

American Express: ^3[47][0-9]{5,}$ American Express card numbers start with 34 or 37.

Diners Club: ^3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{4,}$ Diners Club card numbers begin with 300 through 305, 36 or 38. There are Diners Club cards that begin with 5 and have 16 digits. These are a joint venture between Diners Club and MasterCard, and should be processed like a MasterCard.

Discover: ^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{3,}$ Discover card numbers begin with 6011 or 65.

JCB: ^(?:2131|1800|35[0-9]{3})[0-9]{3,}$ JCB cards begin with 2131, 1800 or 35.

Unfortunately there are a number of card types processed with the MasterCard system that do not live in MasterCard’s IIN range (numbers starting 51...55); the most important case is that of Maestro cards, many of which have been issued from other banks’ IIN ranges and so are located all over the number space. As a result, it may be best to assume that any card that is not of some other type you accept must be a MasterCard.

Important: card numbers do vary in length; for instance, Visa has in the past issued cards with 13 digit PANs and cards with 16 digit PANs. Visa’s documentation currently indicates that it may issue or may have issued numbers with between 12 and 19 digits. Therefore, you should not check the length of the card number, other than to verify that it has at least 7 digits (for a complete IIN plus one check digit, which should match the value predicted by the Luhn algorithm).

One further hint: before processing a cardholder PAN, strip any whitespace and punctuation characters from the input. Why? Because it’s typically much easier to enter the digits in groups, similar to how they’re displayed on the front of an actual credit card, i.e.

4444 4444 4444 4444

is much easier to enter correctly than

4444444444444444

There’s really no benefit in chastising the user because they’ve entered characters you don't expect here.

This also implies making sure that your entry fields have room for at least 24 characters, otherwise users who enter spaces will run out of room. I’d recommend that you make the field wide enough to display 32 characters and allow up to 64; that gives plenty of headroom for expansion.

Here's an image that gives a little more insight:

Credit Card Verification

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3  
great example. do you have the regular expression for maestro cards? –  Manikandan May 6 '13 at 10:26
    
NO, no, no. You cannot rely on the lengths of card numbers; they can change at any time. The only part of the card number you can rely on is the IIN (which used to be called a BIN) and which is a prefix of the number. Additionally, you cannot detect Mastercard cards in the manner you suggest; that will only pick up a subset of the cards that are processed via the Mastercard system (the main problem being Maestro cards, which have a variety of IIN prefixes). –  alastair Feb 4 at 8:03
    
@alastair did you read the expressions before commenting? They were written specifically to use the IIN, so I don't understand what you're trying to say. Furthermore, the IIN can be used to identify the card issuer, but not validate. 5412, for example, does not represent a complete MasterCard, but your suggestion would imply that it does. I have found no proof that MasterCards are anything but 16 digits. Please feel free to provide a source for your claim. You are correct in mentioning an update needs to be made for Maestro cards, however. –  senfo Feb 4 at 22:49
    
@alastair as I understand it, the 10-digit number printed on Maestro cards is not the actual Maestro card number. From my understanding (correct me if I'm wrong), the 19 digit Maestro card number isn't anywhere on the card (for security reasons). –  senfo Feb 4 at 22:56
    
@senfo You’re right, 5412 would not be a complete Mastercard number. IINs are six digits long, so a complete card number must be 7 digits (minimum) and must pass the Luhn check. There’s no need for “proof” that Mastercard numbers have anything other than 16 digits; the point is that, regardless of the situation today, in future they might issue cards with 17 or 18 digits, or for that matter some with 15. Relying on them being 16 digits long is unnecessary and creates a long-term maintenance risk. –  alastair Feb 5 at 7:51

Check this out:

http://www.breakingpar.com/bkp/home.nsf/0/87256B280015193F87256CC70060A01B

function isValidCreditCard(type, ccnum) {
/* Visa: length 16, prefix 4, dashes optional.
Mastercard: length 16, prefix 51-55, dashes optional.
Discover: length 16, prefix 6011, dashes optional.
American Express: length 15, prefix 34 or 37.
Diners: length 14, prefix 30, 36, or 38. */

  var re = new Regex({ "visa": "/^4\d{3}-?\d{4}-?\d{4}-?\d",
                       "mc": "/^5[1-5]\d{2}-?\d{4}-?\d{4}-?\d{4}$/",
                       "disc": "/^6011-?\d{4}-?\d{4}-?\d{4}$/",
                       "amex": "/^3[47]\d{13}$/",
                       "diners": "/^3[068]\d{12}$/"}[type.toLowerCase()])

   if (!re.test(ccnum)) return false;
   // Remove all dashes for the checksum checks to eliminate negative numbers
   ccnum = ccnum.split("-").join("");
   // Checksum ("Mod 10")
   // Add even digits in even length strings or odd digits in odd length strings.
   var checksum = 0;
   for (var i=(2-(ccnum.length % 2)); i<=ccnum.length; i+=2) {
      checksum += parseInt(ccnum.charAt(i-1));
   }
   // Analyze odd digits in even length strings or even digits in odd length strings.
   for (var i=(ccnum.length % 2) + 1; i<ccnum.length; i+=2) {
      var digit = parseInt(ccnum.charAt(i-1)) * 2;
      if (digit < 10) { checksum += digit; } else { checksum += (digit-9); }
   }
   if ((checksum % 10) == 0) return true; else return false;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
The character classes ([4,7], [0,6,8]) shouldn't have commas in them. That means commas match too! –  matthewwithanm Oct 19 '11 at 20:25
4  
@matthew I'm from the future, but I fixed it –  Hubro Jul 17 '12 at 19:22

In javascript:

function detectCardType(number) {
    var re = {
        electron: /^(4026|417500|4405|4508|4844|4913|4917)\d+$/,
        maestro: /^(5018|5020|5038|5612|5893|6304|6759|6761|6762|6763|0604|6390)\d+$/,
        dankort: /^(5019)\d+$/,
        interpayment: /^(636)\d+$/,
        unionpay: /^(62|88)\d+$/,
        visa: /^4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?$/,
        mastercard: /^5[1-5][0-9]{14}$/,
        amex: /^3[47][0-9]{13}$/,
        diners: /^3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}$/,
        discover: /^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}$/,
        jcb: /^(?:2131|1800|35\d{3})\d{11}$/
    };
    if (re.electron.test(number)) {
        return 'ELECTRON';
    } else if (re.maestro.test(number)) {
        return 'MAESTRO';
    } else if (re.dankort.test(number)) {
        return 'DANKORT';
    } else if (re.interpayment.test(number)) {
        return 'INTERPAYMENT';
    } else if (re.unionpay.test(number)) {
        return 'UNIONPAY';
    } else if (re.visa.test(number)) {
        return 'VISA';
    } else if (re.mastercard.test(number)) {
        return 'MASTERCARD';
    } else if (re.amex.test(number)) {
        return 'AMEX';
    } else if (re.diners.test(number)) {
        return 'DINERS';
    } else if (re.discover.test(number)) {
        return 'DISCOVER';
    } else if (re.jcb.test(number)) {
        return 'JCB';
    } else {
        return undefined;
    }
}

Unit test:

describe('CreditCard', function() {
    describe('#detectCardType', function() {

        var cards = {
            '8800000000000000': 'UNIONPAY',

            '4026000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4175000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4405000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4508000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4844000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4913000000000000': 'ELECTRON',
            '4917000000000000': 'ELECTRON',

            '5019000000000000': 'DANKORT',

            '5018000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '5020000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '5038000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '5612000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '5893000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6304000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6759000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6761000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6762000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6763000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '0604000000000000': 'MAESTRO',
            '6390000000000000': 'MAESTRO',

            '3528000000000000': 'JCB',
            '3589000000000000': 'JCB',
            '3529000000000000': 'JCB',

            '6360000000000000': 'INTERPAYMENT',

            '4916338506082832': 'VISA',
            '4556015886206505': 'VISA',
            '4539048040151731': 'VISA',
            '4024007198964305': 'VISA',
            '4716175187624512': 'VISA',

            '5280934283171080': 'MASTERCARD',
            '5456060454627409': 'MASTERCARD',
            '5331113404316994': 'MASTERCARD',
            '5259474113320034': 'MASTERCARD',
            '5442179619690834': 'MASTERCARD',

            '6011894492395579': 'DISCOVER',
            '6011388644154687': 'DISCOVER',
            '6011880085013612': 'DISCOVER',
            '6011652795433988': 'DISCOVER',
            '6011375973328347': 'DISCOVER',

            '345936346788903': 'AMEX',
            '377669501013152': 'AMEX',
            '373083634595479': 'AMEX',
            '370710819865268': 'AMEX',
            '371095063560404': 'AMEX'
        };

        Object.keys(cards).forEach(function(number) {
            it('should detect card ' + number + ' as ' + cards[number], function() {
                Basket.detectCardType(number).should.equal(cards[number]);
            });
        });
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Test fiddle created here jsfiddle.net/ipsjolly/9whmL9u0 –  jolly.exe Aug 12 at 9:43

recently I needed such functionality, I was porting Zend Framework Credit Card Validator to ruby. ruby gem: https://github.com/Fivell/credit_card_validations zend framework: https://github.com/zendframework/zf2/blob/master/library/Zend/Validator/CreditCard.php

They both use INN ranges for detecting type. Here you can read about INN

According to this you can detect credit card alternatively (without regexps,but declaring some rules about prefixes and possible length)

So we have next rules for most used cards

   VISA = [
        {length: [16], prefixes: ['4']}
    ]
    MASTERCARD = [
        {length: [16], prefixes: ['51', '52', '53', '54', '55']}
    ]
    ######## other brands ########
    AMEX = [
        {length: [15], prefixes: ['34', '37']}
    ]

    DINERS = [
        {length: [14], prefixes: ['300', '301', '302', '303', '304', '305', '36']},
    ]

    #There are Diners Club (North America) cards that begin with 5. These are a joint venture between Diners Club and MasterCard, and are processed like a MasterCard
    DINERS_US = [
        {length: [16], prefixes: ['54', '55']}
    ]

    DISCOVER = [
        {length: [16], prefixes: ['6011', '622126', '622127', '622128', '622129', '62213',
                                '62214', '62215', '62216', '62217', '62218', '62219',
                                '6222', '6223', '6224', '6225', '6226', '6227', '6228',
                                '62290', '62291', '622920', '622921', '622922', '622923',
                                '622924', '622925', '644', '645', '646', '647', '648',
                                '649', '65']}
    ]

    JCB = [
        {length: [16], prefixes: ['3528', '3529', '353', '354', '355', '356', '357', '358']}
    ]


    LASER = [
        {length: [16, 17, 18, 19], prefixes: ['6304', '6706', '6771', '6709']}
    ]

    MAESTRO = [
        {length: [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19], prefixes: ['5018', '5020', '5038', '6304', '6759', '6761', '6763']}
    ]

    SOLO = [
        {length: [16, 18, 19], prefixes: ['6334', '6767']}
    ]

    UNIONPAY = [
        {length: [16, 17, 18, 19], prefixes: ['620', '621', '623', '625', '626']}
    ]

Then by searching prefix and comparing length you can detect credit card brand. Also don't forget about luhn algoritm (it is descibed here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luhn).

share|improve this answer
1  
Very illustrative. VISA cards may be 13 digits long. –  Herman Kan Jun 11 at 6:02
    
@HermanKan, no VISA website says it should be 16 length, I think long time ago it could be 13, but not nowadays –  Fivell Jul 7 at 21:28
    
Well, at least PayPal accepts VISA 4222222222222 in test mode (developer.paypal.com/docs/classic/payflow/integration-guide/…), so this depends on whether your code is to work in both live and test modes. –  Herman Kan Jul 8 at 7:45
    
I think it is legacy support –  Fivell Jul 8 at 10:11
    
@HermanKan, there is one more thing, VISA has VPay cards and accroding to wikipedia Visa's VPay brand can specify PAN lengths from 13 to 19 digits an so card number of more than 16 digits are now being seen. –  Fivell Jul 8 at 10:14

Here's Complete C# or VB code for all kinds of CC related things on codeproject.

  • IsValidNumber
  • GetCardTypeFromNumber
  • GetCardTestNumber
  • PassesLuhnTest

This article has been up for a couple years with no negative comments.

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1  
@barett - fixed it. looks like they moved it from 'aspnet' category to 'validation' category which changed the link –  Simon_Weaver Aug 20 '10 at 19:56
2  
Link is broken. Maybe this is the same utility? codeproject.com/Articles/20271/… –  Josh Noe Feb 15 '13 at 20:45
  public string GetCreditCardType(string CreditCardNumber)
    {
        Regex regVisa = new Regex("^4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?$");
        Regex regMaster = new Regex("^5[1-5][0-9]{14}$");
        Regex regExpress = new Regex("^3[47][0-9]{13}$");
        Regex regDiners = new Regex("^3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}$");
        Regex regDiscover = new Regex("^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}$");
        Regex regJSB= new Regex("^(?:2131|1800|35\\d{3})\\d{11}$");


        if(regVisa.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "VISA";
       else if (regMaster.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "MASTER";
      else  if (regExpress.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "AEXPRESS";
       else if (regDiners.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "DINERS";
       else if (regDiscover.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "DISCOVERS";
       else   if (regJSB.IsMatch(CreditCardNumber))
            return "JSB";
       else
        return "invalid";
    }

Here is the function to check Credit card type using Regex

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2  
This approaches forces a recompilation of each regular expression for each card type each time the method is called, even if the first card type is matched. –  Edward Brey May 12 at 22:26
    
@Edward Thx, i have updated my answer . –  Usman Y Aug 28 at 13:31

Here is a php class function returns CCtype by CCnumber.
This code not validates the card or not runs Luhn algorithm only try to find credit card type based on table in this page. basicly uses CCnumber length and CCcard prefix to determine CCcard type.

    <?php class CreditcardType
    {
   public static $creditcardTypes = array(
            array('Name'=>'American Express','cardLength'=>array(15),'cardPrefix'=>array('34', '37'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Maestro','cardLength'=>array(12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19),'cardPrefix'=>array('5018', '5020', '5038', '6304', '6759', '6761', '6763'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Mastercard','cardLength'=>array(16),'cardPrefix'=>array('51', '52', '53', '54', '55'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Visa','cardLength'=>array(13,16),'cardPrefix'=>array('4'))
            ,array('Name'=>'JCB','cardLength'=>array(16),'cardPrefix'=>array('3528', '3529', '353', '354', '355', '356', '357', '358'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Discover','cardLength'=>array(16),'cardPrefix'=>array('6011', '622126', '622127', '622128', '622129', '62213',
                                        '62214', '62215', '62216', '62217', '62218', '62219',
                                        '6222', '6223', '6224', '6225', '6226', '6227', '6228',
                                        '62290', '62291', '622920', '622921', '622922', '622923',
                                        '622924', '622925', '644', '645', '646', '647', '648',
                                        '649', '65'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Solo','cardLength'=>array(16, 18, 19),'cardPrefix'=>array('6334', '6767'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Unionpay','cardLength'=>array(16, 17, 18, 19),'cardPrefix'=>array('622126', '622127', '622128', '622129', '62213', '62214',
                                        '62215', '62216', '62217', '62218', '62219', '6222', '6223',
                                        '6224', '6225', '6226', '6227', '6228', '62290', '62291',
                                        '622920', '622921', '622922', '622923', '622924', '622925'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Diners Club','cardLength'=>array(14),'cardPrefix'=>array('300', '301', '302', '303', '304', '305', '36'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Diners Club US','cardLength'=>array(16),'cardPrefix'=>array('54', '55'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Diners Club Carte Blanche','cardLength'=>array(14),'cardPrefix'=>array('300','305'))
            ,array('Name'=>'Laser','cardLength'=>array(16, 17, 18, 19),'cardPrefix'=>array('6304', '6706', '6771', '6709'))
    );     
        private function __construct() {}    
        public static function getType($CCNumber)
        {
            $CCNumber= trim($CCNumber);
            $type='Unknown';
            foreach (CreditcardType::$creditcardTypes as $card){
                if (! in_array(strlen($CCNumber),$card['cardLength'])) {
                    continue;
                }
                $prefixes = '/^('.implode('|',$card['cardPrefix']).')/';            
                if(preg_match($prefixes,$CCNumber) == 1 ){
                    $type= $card['Name'];
                    break;
                }
            }
            return $type;
        }
    } ?>
share|improve this answer

Compact javascript version

    var getCardType = function (number) {
        var cards = {
            visa: /^4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?$/,
            mastercard: /^5[1-5][0-9]{14}$/,
            amex: /^3[47][0-9]{13}$/,
            diners: /^3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}$/,
            discover: /^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}$/,
            jcb: /^(?:2131|1800|35\d{3})\d{11}$/
        };
        for (var card in cards) {
            if (cards[card].test(number)) {
                return card;
            }
        }
    };
share|improve this answer

The first numbers of the credit card can be used to approximate the vendor:

  • Visa: 49,44 or 47
  • Visa electron: 42, 45, 48, 49
  • MasterCard: 51
  • Amex:34
  • Diners: 30, 36, 38
  • JCB: 35
share|improve this answer

Do not try to detect credit card type as part of processing a payment. You are risking of declining valid transactions.

If you need to provide information to your payment processor (e.g. PayPal credit card object requires to name the card type), then guess it from the least information available, e.g.

$credit_card['pan'] = preg_replace('/[^0-9]/', '', $credit_card['pan']);
$inn = (int) mb_substr($credit_card['pan'], 0, 2);

// @see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Bank_Identification_Numbers#Overview
if ($inn >= 40 && $inn <= 49) {
    $type = 'visa';
} else if ($inn >= 51 && $inn <= 55) {
    $type = 'mastercard';
} else if ($inn >= 60 && $inn <= 65) {
    $type = 'discover';
} else if ($inn >= 34 && $inn <= 37) {
    $type = 'amex';
} else {
    throw new \UnexpectedValueException('Unsupported card type.');
}

This implementation (using only the first two digits) is enough to identify all of the major (and in PayPal's case all of the supported) card schemes. In fact, you might want to skip the exception altogether and default to the most popular card type. Let the payment gateway/processor tell you if there is a validation error in response to your request.

The reality is that your payment gateway does not care about the value you provide.

share|improve this answer
    
This is simply untrue. I know of 3 different providers that DO require card types to be passed in, and if you do not pass it in, the transaction will fail. –  Ed DeGagne Apr 15 at 12:52
1  
@EdDeGagne - "does not care what value" is not the same as "does not care if passed in". –  kkhugs Aug 6 at 19:56
    
Where did I specify either? I simply mentioned that there are providers in use that require YOU to pass in the CC type, nothing more. –  Ed DeGagne Aug 18 at 19:28

My solution with jQuery:

function detectCreditCardType() {
    var type = new Array;
    type[1] = '^4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?$';      // visa
    type[2] = '^5[1-5][0-9]{14}$';              // mastercard
    type[3] = '^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}$';  // discover
    type[4] = '^3[47][0-9]{13}$';               // amex

    var ccnum = $('.creditcard').val().replace(/[^\d.]/g, '');
    var returntype = 0;

    $.each(type, function(idx, re) {
        var regex = new RegExp(re);
        if(regex.test(ccnum) && idx>0) {
            returntype = idx;
        }
    });

    return returntype;
}

In case 0 is returned, credit card type is undetected.

"creditcard" class should be added to the credit card input field.

share|improve this answer
    
Variation of existing answers. –  Gajus Kuizinas Aug 6 at 21:58
    
Yes, I used the code from the above answers, IMPROVED it and posted it here. Thanks for the downvote... –  Piero Aug 7 at 15:09
    
You should have (a) suggested this as an improvement to the existing code, (b) written the appropriate contributions, or (c) reference the sources that you have used to write the regular expressions. –  Gajus Kuizinas Aug 8 at 9:29
    
Gajus, I believe I helped the community the way I could at that moment, please stop telling me I should've done something for someone. I did what I though could've been helpful. –  Piero Aug 8 at 15:00
// abobjects.com, parvez ahmad ab bulk mailer
use below script

function isValidCreditCard2(type, ccnum) {
       if (type == "Visa") {
          // Visa: length 16, prefix 4, dashes optional.
          var re = /^4\d{3}?\d{4}?\d{4}?\d{4}$/;
       } else if (type == "MasterCard") {
          // Mastercard: length 16, prefix 51-55, dashes optional.
          var re = /^5[1-5]\d{2}?\d{4}?\d{4}?\d{4}$/;
       } else if (type == "Discover") {
          // Discover: length 16, prefix 6011, dashes optional.
          var re = /^6011?\d{4}?\d{4}?\d{4}$/;
       } else if (type == "AmEx") {
          // American Express: length 15, prefix 34 or 37.
          var re = /^3[4,7]\d{13}$/;
       } else if (type == "Diners") {
          // Diners: length 14, prefix 30, 36, or 38.
          var re = /^3[0,6,8]\d{12}$/;
       }
       if (!re.test(ccnum)) return false;
       return true;
       /*
       // Remove all dashes for the checksum checks to eliminate negative numbers
       ccnum = ccnum.split("-").join("");
       // Checksum ("Mod 10")
       // Add even digits in even length strings or odd digits in odd length strings.
       var checksum = 0;
       for (var i=(2-(ccnum.length % 2)); i<=ccnum.length; i+=2) {
          checksum += parseInt(ccnum.charAt(i-1));
       }
       // Analyze odd digits in even length strings or even digits in odd length strings.
       for (var i=(ccnum.length % 2) + 1; i<ccnum.length; i+=2) {
          var digit = parseInt(ccnum.charAt(i-1)) * 2;
          if (digit < 10) { checksum += digit; } else { checksum += (digit-9); }
       }
       if ((checksum % 10) == 0) return true; else return false;
       */

    }
jQuery.validator.addMethod("isValidCreditCard", function(postalcode, element) { 
    return isValidCreditCard2($("#cardType").val(), $("#cardNum").val()); 

}, "<br>credit card is invalid");


     Type</td>
                                          <td class="text">&nbsp; <form:select path="cardType" cssclass="fields" style="border: 1px solid #D5D5D5;padding: 0px 0px 0px 0px;width: 130px;height: 22px;">
                                              <option value="SELECT">SELECT</option>
                                              <option value="MasterCard">Mastercard</option>
                                              <option value="Visa">Visa</option>
                                               <option value="AmEx">American Express</option>
                                              <option value="Discover">Discover</option>
                                            </form:select> <font color="#FF0000">*</font> 

$("#signupForm").validate({

    rules:{
       companyName:{required: true},
       address1:{required: true},
       city:{required: true},
       state:{required: true},
       zip:{required: true},
       country:{required: true},
       chkAgree:{required: true},
       confPassword:{required: true},
       lastName:{required: true},
       firstName:{required: true},
       ccAddress1:{required: true},
       ccZip:{         
           postalcode : true
       },
       phone:{required: true},
       email:{
           required: true,
           email: true
           },
       userName:{
           required: true,
           minlength: 6
           },
       password:{
           required: true,
           minlength: 6
           },          
       cardNum:{           
            isValidCreditCard : true
       },
share|improve this answer
    
The question is about the algorithm to check a credit card, not a specific implementation. What does this code do? –  Emil Vikström Oct 11 '12 at 4:35

Just a little spoon feeding:

$("#CreditCardNumber").focusout(function () {


        var regVisa = /^4[0-9]{12}(?:[0-9]{3})?$/;
        var regMasterCard = /^5[1-5][0-9]{14}$/;
        var regAmex = /^3[47][0-9]{13}$/;
        var regDiscover = /^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}$/;

        if (regVisa.test($(this).val())) {
            $("#CCImage").html("<img height='40px' src='@Url.Content("~/images/visa.png")'>");          

        }

        else if (regMasterCard.test($(this).val())) {
        $("#CCImage").html("<img height='40px' src='@Url.Content("~/images/mastercard.png")'>");

        }

        else if (regAmex.test($(this).val())) {

           $("#CCImage").html("<img height='40px' src='@Url.Content("~/images/amex.png")'>");

        }
         else if (regDiscover.test($(this).val())) {

           $("#CCImage").html("<img height='40px' src='@Url.Content("~/images/discover.png")'>");

        }
        else {
        $("#CCImage").html("NA");

        }

    });
share|improve this answer

In javascript I use this function. This is good when u assign it to an onkeyup event and it give result as soon as possible.

function cc_brand_id(cur_val) {
    var sel_brand;

    // the regular expressions check for possible matches as you type, hence the OR operators based on the number of chars
    // Visa
    visa_regex = new RegExp('^4[0-9]{0,15}$');
    // MasterCard
    mastercard_regex = new RegExp('^5[1-5][0-9]{0,17}$');
    // Maestro
    maestro_regex = new RegExp('^6[7-9][0-9]{0,17}$');
    // American Express
    amex_regex = new RegExp('^3$|^3[47][0-9]{0,13}$');
    // Diners Club
    diners_regex = new RegExp('^3$|^3[068]$|^3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{0,11}$');
    //Discover
    discover_regex = new RegExp('^6$|^6[05]$|^601[1]?$|^65[0-9][0-9]?$|^6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{0,12}$');
    //JCB
    jcb_regex = new RegExp('^2[1]?$|^21[3]?$|^1[8]?$|^18[0]?$|^(?:2131|1800)[0-9]{0,11}$|^3[5]?$|^35[0-9]{0,14}$');

    // get rid of spaces and dashes before using the regular expression
    cur_val = cur_val.replace(/ /g, '').replace(/-/g, '');

    // checks per each, as their could be multiple hits
    if (cur_val.match(visa_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "visa";
    } else if (cur_val.match(mastercard_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "mastercard";
    } else if (cur_val.match(maestro_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "maestro";
    } else if (cur_val.match(amex_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "amex";
    } else if (cur_val.match(diners_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "diners_club";
    } else if (cur_val.match(discover_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "discover";
    } else if (cur_val.match(jcb_regex)) {
        sel_brand = "jcb";
    } else {
        sel_brand = "unknown";
    }

    return sel_brand;
}

Here you can play with it:

http://jsfiddle.net/upN3L/

share|improve this answer

The regular expression rules that match the respective card vendors:

  • (4\d{12}(?:\d{3})?) for VISA.
  • (5[1-5]\d{14}) for MasterCard.
  • (3[47]\d{13}) for AMEX.
  • ((?:5020|5038|6304|6579|6761)\d{12}(?:\d\d)?) for Maestro.
  • (3(?:0[0-5]|[68][0-9])[0-9]{11}) for Diners Club.
  • (6(?:011|5[0-9]{2})[0-9]{12}) for Discover.
  • (35[2-8][89]\d\d\d{10}) for JCB.
share|improve this answer

You can even check if your card number is invalid by doing some simple calculations using the numbers printed across the front of your card. There's two handy infographics here that really help http://redshed.co.uk/blog/how-do-credit-card-numbers-work/ to find out how you can verify your card number using the famous Luhn algorithm!

share|improve this answer

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