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I use the database name in several places in my script and I want to be able to quickly change it, so I'm looking for something like this:

DECLARE @DBNAME VARCHAR(50)
SET @DBNAME = 'TEST'

CREATE DATABASE @DBNAME
GO
ALTER DATABASE @DBNAME SET COMPATIBILITY_LEVEL = 90
GO
ALTER DATABASE @DBNAME SET RECOVERY SIMPLE 
GO

But it doesn't work. So what's the correct way to write this code?

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Dynamic SQL..... –  mr_eclair Feb 5 '13 at 9:18
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4 Answers

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Put the entire script into a template string, with {SERVERNAME} placeholders. Then edit the string using:

SET @SQL_SCRIPT = REPLACE(@TEMPLATE, '{SERVERNAME}', @DBNAME)

and then run it with

EXECUTE (@SQL_SCRIPT)

It's hard to believe that, in the course of three years, nobody noticed that my code doesn't work!

You can't EXEC multiple batches. GO is a batch separator, not a T-SQL statement. It's necessary to build three separate strings, and then to EXEC each one after substitution.

I suppose one could do something "clever" by breaking the single template string into multiple rows by splitting on GO; I've done that in ADO.NET code.

And where did I get the word "SERVERNAME" from?

Here's some code that I just tested (and which works):

DECLARE @DBNAME VARCHAR(255)
SET @DBNAME = 'TestDB'

DECLARE @CREATE_TEMPLATE VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @COMPAT_TEMPLATE VARCHAR(MAX)
DECLARE @RECOVERY_TEMPLATE VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @CREATE_TEMPLATE = 'CREATE DATABASE {DBNAME}'
SET @COMPAT_TEMPLATE='ALTER DATABASE {DBNAME} SET COMPATIBILITY_LEVEL = 90'
SET @RECOVERY_TEMPLATE='ALTER DATABASE {DBNAME} SET RECOVERY SIMPLE'

DECLARE @SQL_SCRIPT VARCHAR(MAX)

SET @SQL_SCRIPT = REPLACE(@CREATE_TEMPLATE, '{DBNAME}', @DBNAME)
EXECUTE (@SQL_SCRIPT)

SET @SQL_SCRIPT = REPLACE(@COMPAT_TEMPLATE, '{DBNAME}', @DBNAME)
EXECUTE (@SQL_SCRIPT)

SET @SQL_SCRIPT = REPLACE(@RECOVERY_TEMPLATE, '{DBNAME}', @DBNAME)
EXECUTE (@SQL_SCRIPT)
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2  
+1 Nice use of "replace". –  Andrew Hare Apr 7 '09 at 23:52
2  
+1 Very nice approach... You just saved me from a ton of work, thx... Though it should be EXECUTE(@SQL_SCRIPT), or at least that is what worked for me. –  reSPAWNed Sep 14 '11 at 18:17
1  
Need to be careful with escaping, though. –  usr May 29 '13 at 11:57
3  
SYSNAME would be a more appropriate datatype than VARCHAR(255) also should use QUOTENAME to deal with all possible database names (and possibly to prevent SQL injection depending on source of the name) –  Martin Smith Nov 14 '13 at 11:03
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You can also use sqlcmd mode for this (enable this on the "Query" menu in Management Studio).

:setvar dbname "TEST" 

CREATE DATABASE $(dbname)
GO
ALTER DATABASE $(dbname) SET COMPATIBILITY_LEVEL = 90
GO
ALTER DATABASE $(dbname) SET RECOVERY SIMPLE 
GO
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Unfortunately you can't declare database names with a variable in that format.

For what you're trying to accomplish, you're going to need to wrap your statements within an EXEC() statement. So you'd have something like:

SELECT @Sql ='CREATE DATABASE ' + @DBNAME

Then call

EXECUTE(@Sql) or sp_executesql(@Sql)

to execute the sql string.

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EXEC looks for a stored procedure. In this case EXECUTE is needed. –  Bob Blogge Jul 18 '13 at 18:42
    
Thanks @BobBlogge - I've updated it. –  Dillie-O Jul 19 '13 at 0:20
    
Actually I need to apologize. It turns out EXEC and EXECUTE are the same. I made the statement after failing with EXEC and succeeding with EXECUTE. Though obviously my real problem was unrelated to either. –  Bob Blogge Jul 19 '13 at 13:36
    
works perfectly.should be upvoted. thanks –  NBrowne Nov 28 '13 at 9:54
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You cannot use a variable in a create table statement. The best thing I can suggest is to write the entire query as a string and exec that.

Try something like this:

declare @query varchar(max);
set @query = 'create database TEST...';

exec (@query);
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