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I'm a little confused by the ~ operator. Code goes below:

a = 1
~a  #-2
b = 15
~b  #-16

How does ~ do work?

I thought, ~a would be something like:

0001 = a
1110 = ~a 

why not?

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2  
This question has been answered many times.... – JBernardo Sep 2 '11 at 2:50
1  
For example: stackoverflow.com/questions/3027394/…. – S.Lott Sep 2 '11 at 2:53
up vote 22 down vote accepted

You are exactly right. It's an artifact of two's complement integer representation.

In 16 bits, 1 is represented as 0000 0000 0000 0001. Inverted, you get 1111 1111 1111 1110, which is -2. Similarly, 15 is 0000 0000 0000 1111. Inverted, you get 1111 1111 1111 0000, which is -16.

In general, ~n = -n - 1

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how do I get that bit representation string in python 3? – Janus Troelsen Oct 22 '12 at 13:00
    
In python interactive shell, try it as print(int('0001', 2)) reference:wiki.python.org/moin/BitManipulation – Praneeth Jun 24 '15 at 15:58

The '~' operator is defined as: "The bit-wise inversion of x is defined as -(x+1). It only applies to integral numbers."Python Doc - 5.5

The important part of this sentence is that this is related to 'integral numbers' (also called integers). Your example represents a 4 bit number.

'0001' = 1 

The integer range of a 4 bit number is '-8..0..7'. On the other hand you could use 'unsigned integers', that do not include negative number and the range for your 4 bit number would be '0..15'.

Since Python operates on integers the behavior you described is expected. Integers are represented using two's complement. In case of a 4 bit number this looks like the following.

 7 = '0111'
 0 = '0000'
-1 = '1111'
-8 = '1000'

Python uses 32bit for integer representation in case you have a 32-bit OS. You can check the largest integer with:

sys.maxint # (2^31)-1 for my system

In case you would like an unsigned integer returned for you 4 bit number you have to mask.

'0001' = a   # unsigned '1' / integer '1'
'1110' = ~a  # unsigned '14' / integer -2

(~a & 0xF) # returns 14

If you want to get an unsigned 8 bit number range (0..255) instead just use:

(~a & 0xFF) # returns 254
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