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Is there any ternary operator or the like in PHP that acts like ?? of C#? ?? in C# is clean and shorter, in PHP you have to do something like:

//This is absolutely okay except that $_REQUEST['someres'] is kinda redundant (when typing) for me.
 echo isset($_REQUEST['test'])? $_REQUEST['test'] : 'hi';

 //This is perfect! shorter and cleaner but only in this situation. 
 echo null? : 'replacement if empty';

//This line gives error when $_REQUEST['test'] is NOT set.
echo $_REQUEST['someres']?: 'hi';
share|improve this question
    
?: is very close to ??. In fact, ?: actually catches more null-like cases than ??; ?? is specifically for null and !Nullabe<T>.HasValue. You sound like you're looking for something more like JavaScript's || operator. It's like ?:, but JavaScript doesn't complain about referencing undefined keys/members--though it does throw an error if you try to reference a key/member of undefined/null, so you can only go one level. –  Zenexer Jul 14 '13 at 13:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There is no any operator that behaves in exactly same way, but you could look at short way of writing php's ternary operator ?: (php 5.3 only)

And your comparison to C# is not fair enough "in C# is clean and shorter, in PHP you have to do something like" --- in C# you also will have runtime error if you try to access a non existent array/dictionary item

share|improve this answer
2  
Really? So if I'm accessing a non-existent array element? I will get error too, yes, that makes sense. –  dpp Sep 2 '11 at 3:04
    
@NullUserException: thanks, I always get in stuck with such sort of phrases :-( –  zerkms Sep 2 '11 at 3:06
1  
It's a perfectly fair statement. The System.Linq namespace provides extension method TSource Enumerable.ElementAtOrDefault<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int index) for arrays and such. IDictionary<TKey, TValue> itself provides a method for this: bool IDictionary<TKey, TValue>.TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value). This method returns two values, as C# differentiates more explicitly between null and unset. If you'd rather treat null and unset equally, you could easily write an extension method. –  Zenexer Jul 13 '13 at 22:53
    
@Zenexer: the question was not about methods, but about operators. Thanks for downvoting without any reason. –  zerkms Jul 13 '13 at 23:19
    
@zerkms Look at it from the point of view of the person asking the question. They want a solution, not strictly an operator. An answer is not the place for you to get defensive. –  Zenexer Jul 14 '13 at 0:32

I use function. Obviously it is not operator, but seems cleaner than your approach:

function isset_or(&$check, $alternate = NULL)
{
    return (isset($check)) ? $check : $alternate;
}

Usage:

isset_or($_REQUEST['test'],'hi');
share|improve this answer
    
Why pass the $check var as reference? –  Axel A. Grazx Dec 27 '13 at 19:27
    
@AxelA.Grazx: I am passing as reference, because if it is not sent as reference, $_REQUEST['test'] value will be calculated before function call and then passed to function. It will throw Undefined index: test error if $REQUEST array doesn't have this element. I wanted to avoid that. –  LukLed Jan 7 at 22:36
    
Ohhh... Now I see... Nice approach. –  Axel A. Grazx Jan 8 at 0:13
/**
 * Returns the first entry that passes an isset() test.
 *
 * Each entry can either be a single value: $value, or an array-key pair:
 * $array, $key.  If all entries fail isset(), or no entries are passed,
 * then first() will return null.
 *
 * $array must be an array that passes isset() on its own, or it will be
 * treated as a standalone $value.  $key must be a valid array key, or
 * both $array and $key will be treated as standalone $value entries. To
 * be considered a valid key, $key must pass:
 *
 *     is_null($key) || is_string($key) || is_int($key) || is_float($key)
 *         || is_bool($key)
 *
 * If $value is an array, it must be the last entry, the following entry
 * must be a valid array-key pair, or the following entry's $value must
 * not be a valid $key.  Otherwise, $value and the immediately following
 * $value will be treated as an array-key pair's $array and $key,
 * respectfully.  See above for $key validity tests.
 */
function first(/* [(array $array, $key) | $value]... */)
{
    $count = func_num_args();

    for ($i = 0; $i < $count - 1; $i++)
    {
        $arg = func_get_arg($i);

        if (!isset($arg))
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (is_array($arg))
        {
            $key = func_get_arg($i + 1);

            if (is_null($key) || is_string($key) || is_int($key) || is_float($key) || is_bool($key))
            {
                if (isset($arg[$key]))
                {
                    return $arg[$key];
                }

                $i++;
                continue;
            }
        }

        return $arg;
    }

    if ($i < $count)
    {
        return func_get_arg($i);
    }

    return null;
}

Usage:

$option = first($option_override, $_REQUEST, 'option', $_SESSION, 'option', false);

This would try each variable until it finds one that satisfies isset():

  1. $option_override
  2. $_REQUEST['option']
  3. $_SESSION['option']
  4. false

If 4 weren't there, it would default to null.

share|improve this answer

No, there isn't. If you need to involve isset, the pattern to use is isset($var) ? $var : null. There's no ?: operator that includes the characteristics of isset.

share|improve this answer
2  
And this basically makes it useless for most cases. :/ –  ThiefMaster Dec 29 '11 at 14:42
1  
I still find a lot of use cases for it; it's basically PHP's equivalent to Javascript's || operator, which is very handy. :) –  deceze Dec 30 '11 at 0:48

?? is binary in c#, not ternary. And it has no equivalence in php.

share|improve this answer
1  
The equivalent is ?: in PHP 5.3. E.g. test ?: ifNull === test ? test : ifNull. In other words, ?: can be either binary or ternary in PHP as the middle operand is optional. –  chaiguy Jun 4 '13 at 19:21
    
Actually, ?? in C# is ternary. It's syntactic sugar for a ternary operation. It's just written in binary form. –  Zenexer Jul 13 '13 at 22:55
2  
@Zenexer: It's a binary operator, and it's not just syntactic sugar - func() ?? otherfunc() only calls func once, whereas func()!=null ? func() : otherfunc() calls it twice, so if func has side effects the results are completely different. –  aboveyou00 Jul 29 '13 at 18:42
    
@aboveyou00 Interesting; I didn't know that. –  Zenexer Jul 30 '13 at 19:56

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