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I want to create proxies for member functions and operators. They must have the same return type and parameters, and must be good for several classes, which are given as template parameters. Even if the class does not have the particular member function or operator, I want it to compile instead of failing with an error, essentially SFINAE. If X has a method f() and Y does not have any method named f, I need Proxy<X> to have an f() as well that calls X::f(), and I need Proxy<Y> to compile and instantiate without any problems.

Extracting the return type from a known function is no longer a problem, after a previous question of mine. However it fails with an error if there is no such function.

I already know several template metaprogramming tricks to determine whether a given function exists, and enable a certain feature if they do, however, they all work only on hardwired function names instead of arbitrary ones, which severely limits their use in this case since I need the same construct for several functions.

I only need to check whether any function with the given name exists, if there are overloaded variants I do not need to check if a specific one exists, automatic template deduction solves that (or so I hope)

My current code looks like this:

template <class T>
class Proxy
{

    //  using my resultof solution
    template <class... Args>
    resultof(T::f, Args...) f (Args... x)
    {
        return x.f(x...);
    }

    //  using another return type extraction solution
    template <class... Args>
    typeof(T::f(std::declval<Args>()...)) f (Args... x)
    {
        return x.f(x...);
    }

    T x;

};

Which should compile even if T does not have any function named f. Unfortunately both version fail with an error.

The implementation of resultof being

#define resultof(f, ...) typeof(Param<__VA_ARGS__>::Func(f))

template <class... Args>
class Param
{

    public:

        template <class R>
        static R Func (R (*) (Args...));

        template <class R, class C>
        static R Func (R (C::*) (Args...));

        template <class R, class C>
        static R Func (R (C::*) (Args...) const);

};
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I suspect that

template<typename... Args>
decltype( std::declval<T&>().f(std::declval<Args>()...) )
f(Args&&... args)
{
    return x.f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

should trigger SFINAE and discard any instantiation of f for which the return type is ill-formed (e.g. ambiguous or non-existant overload) instead of a hard error. I'm not quite sure though because T is a parameter of proxy, not f and I simply can't parse the relevant parts of the Standard (around 14.8.2 I believe). None of the examples provided in the non normative notes seems to apply.

Failing that, it's possible to use

template<typename U = T&, typename... Args>
decltype( std::declval<U>().f(std::declval<Args>()...) )
f(Args&&... args)
{
    return x.f(std::forward<Args>(args)...);
}

for which my compiler happily accepts proxy<int> p;, unlike with the first option. p.f(); results in a 'No matching function found' error, as is usual with SFINAE.


I recommend using the freestanding form of the operators where possible:

template<typename T, typename U>
auto operator+(Proxy<T> const& lhs, Proxy<U> const& rhs)
-> decltype( std::declval<T const&>() + std::declval<U const&>() )
{
    return lhs.x + rhs.x;
}

is a possibility.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this solution seems to be working nicely, but strange for operators; needs decltype(std::declval<T&>()(std::declval<Args>()...)) instead of decltype(std::declval<T&>().operator () (std::declval<Args>()...)) –  Frigo Sep 2 '11 at 16:05
1  
@Frigo Perhaps that warrants its own question, I don't see anything special about what you're doing. What happens if you use #define DEFINE_FORWARDING_MEMBER(member_name) \ and paste the above as a multi-line macro, substituting f with member_name? –  Luc Danton Sep 2 '11 at 21:08
1  
@Frigo Using lval(arg0, ...) should be preferred to lval.operator()(arg0, ...) anyway because a legitimate functor may expose its functionality through e.g. a conversion operator, not operator(). Generic code should be specified in terms of valid expressions, not whether a parameter type has an operator() -- those are implementation details. –  Luc Danton Sep 2 '11 at 22:01
1  
@Frigo Added an example for operator+. I'm afraid you can't have one macro to do it all -- at best you can have a macro for each arity. A separate macro (or do it by hand) for each arity for those operators that must be members, too. –  Luc Danton Sep 2 '11 at 22:06
1  
@Frigo SFINAE only ever applies to templates and member functions are not templates, even if they're members of a template. In-class declaration could look like template<typename U = T> decltype( -std::declval<U>() ) operator-() const; for unary operator-. –  Luc Danton Sep 4 '11 at 22:41

At first glance, this seems trivial:

template <typename T> class Proxy : public T { };

Nothing else in C++ will give Proxy<T> all the members of T, for any T. The only bit missing is the ctors, but from your question I infer that you already know how to forward those.

Background: Practically speaking, the set of possible member names of T is infinite. Therefore, you can't find .f() by name lookup in Proxy<T>, and the only other scope in which a member name is looked up is the base class scope.

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Well technically Proxy has a pointer to T instead of a member variable and makes additional checks to ensure it is not NULL for some operations, throwing exceptions if it is. I just didn't want to complicate the question further. Thank you for the input nonetheless, I really appreciate it. –  Frigo Sep 2 '11 at 16:21
    
C++0x brings inherited constructors: using T::T; to make your solution complete. –  Luc Danton Sep 2 '11 at 17:13

You need to isolate the checking of the existence of f in the template parameter of proxy by an extra level. The following will allow you to call proxy<X>::f() in any way that you can call X::f():

template<typename T,typename ... Args>
struct f_result
{
    typedef decltype(std::declval<T&>().f(std::declval<Args&&>()...)) type;
};

template<typename T>
struct proxy
{
    T val;

    template<typename ... Args>
    typename f_result<T,Args...>::type
    f(Args&& ... args)
    {
        return val.f(static_cast<Args&&>(args)...);
    }
};

Quick test:

#include <iostream>

struct X
{
    void f()
    {
        std::cout<<"X::f()"<<std::endl;
    }

    int f(int i)
    {
        std::cout<<"X::f("<<i<<")"<<std::endl;
        return i;
    }
};

struct Y
{};

struct Z
{
    int f()
    {
        std::cout<<"Z::f()"<<std::endl;
        return 42;
    }
};

int main(int, char**)
{
    proxy<X> px;
    px.f();
    int i=px.f(3);
    std::cout<<"i="<<i<<std::endl;

    proxy<Y> py;
    proxy<Z> pz;
    int j=pz.f();
    std::cout<<"j="<<j<<std::endl;
}

This works OK with g++ 4.5 and g++ 4.6 in -std=c++0x mode.

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