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Can I get a reference to the 'owner' class during the init method of a descriptor?

Code is worth a thousand words:

>>> class ShortRib(object):
>>>     def __init__(self, owner):
>>>         self.owner = owner
>>> 
>>>     ... some more methods and stuff ...
>>> 
>>> 
>>> class Cow(object):
>>>     shortRib = ShortRib(self)
>>> 
>>> 
>>> class BrownCow(Cow):
>>>     pass
>>> 
>>> BrownCow.shortRib.owner
<class '__main__.BrownCow'>

This doesn't work, though i wish it would. Basically, I want each class to have some static/class variables (i'm not sure which it is in this case?) but need each of those guys to know who (which class) it belongs to. Unfortunately, I can't "get" at the class in the body of the class declaration. Of course, I could always do this using a decorator:

>>> def vars(**kwargs):
>>>     def wrap(cls):    
>>>         for k, w in kwargs.items():
>>>             setattr(cls, k, w(cls))
>>>         return cls
>>>     return wrap
>>> 
>>> @vars(shortRib=lambda cls: ShortRib(cls)
>>> class BrownCow(Cow):
>>>     ...
>>>
>>> BrownCow.shortRib.owner

which would work. Another way would to have a class decorator that goes through all the shortRibs and similar static variables and sets their owner after the class declaration is complete. However, this seems like an incredibly roundabout and unintuitive way of doing what should be a pretty simple operation: having the static/class members of a class know who they belong to.

Is there a "proper" way of doing this?

Clarification:

I want these members to belong to the class, not to the instances. I'm trying to go for a almost-purely-functional style, using classes only for inheritance of shared behavior, and not creating instances of them at all. Instances would tend to give my functions access to arbitrary instance data shared across all functions, which would break the pure-functioness I am trying for. I could just use empty instances which I don't touch, but I think using pure classes would be cleaner.

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marked as duplicate by Cat Plus Plus, Wooble, robert, HappyLeapSecond, yoda Sep 3 '11 at 16:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Should owner be the class of the owner, or the owner object? –  tauran Sep 2 '11 at 11:41
    
@Cat - Not a duplicate. Maybe he needs the ShortRib bound before an instances are created -- __init__ might not be early enough. –  agf Sep 2 '11 at 11:52
1  
@Li Haoyi: If the coding is simpler with instances of classes, I'd still go with instances. It's easier to change one's mental paradigms than it is to fight a language's paradigms. –  HappyLeapSecond Sep 2 '11 at 15:14
1  
@unutbu (Li will get autopinnged) He's essentially describing singletons. These are much maligned, but in Python, if you really want to implement them, the best way is either the borg / monostate pattern, or using a metaclass. A search for "Python Singleton" on SO will turn up many examples of how to do this. –  agf Sep 2 '11 at 23:24
1  
@unutbu: Just for more context, I am using these singletons to represent web pages, in that each Class represents one page. Since only one page is ever created for one request, and anyway the web scripts should be completely stateless (all the data should be in the DB), it seemed to make sense to use classes purely for inheritance (since many of the pages have huge chunks of view and controller logic in common) and not for instantiation. I still have not decided on the final code structure, so may (or may not) end up switching back to plain instances. Thanks for the help =) –  Li Haoyi Sep 3 '11 at 1:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can easily do this in __new__:

class ShortRib(object):
    def __init__(self, owner):
        self.owner = owner

class Cow(object):
    shortRib = None
    def __new__(cls, *args, **kwargs):
        if cls.shortRib == None:
            cls.shortRib = ShortRib(cls)
        return super(Cow, cls).__new__(cls, *args, **kwargs)

Cow()
Cow.shortRib.owner

Or even __init__, if you don't mind referencing self.__class___.

You can also do it with a metaclass:

class ShortRib(object):
    def __init__(self, owner):
        self.owner = owner

class MetaCow(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, base, attrs):
        attrs['shortRib'] = ShortRib(cls)
        return super(MetaCow, cls).__new__(cls, name, base, attrs)

class Cow(object):
    __metaclass__ = MetaCow

Cow.shortRib.owner
share|improve this answer

Why not let the instances of the Cow class have shortRibs, instead of the class itself?:

class ShortRib(object):
    def __init__(self,owner):
        self.owner=owner

class Cow(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.shortRib=ShortRib(self)

class BrownCow(Cow):
    pass

print(BrownCow().shortRib.owner)
# <__main__.BrownCow object at 0xb76a8d6c>

(Otherwise, you'll need a class decorator or metaclass -- as you've already mentioned. But simple is better than complex, so why not choose simple?)


By the way, if you really do want to use classes instead of instances:

class ShortRib(object):
    def __init__(self, owner):
        self.owner = owner

class MetaCow(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, base, attrs):
        super(MetaCow, cls).__init__(name, base, attrs)
        cls.shortRib = ShortRib(cls)

class Cow(object):
    __metaclass__ = MetaCow

class BrownCow(Cow):
    pass

print(Cow.shortRib.owner)
# <class '__main__.Cow'>

print(BrownCow.shortRib.owner)
# <class '__main__.BrownCow'>

Using

class MetaCow(type):
    def __new__(cls, name, base, attrs):

is incorrect. The signature for type.__new__ is

class MetaCow(type):
    def __new__(meta, name, base, attrs):

Since you want to modify the attributes of cls, not meta, use the MetaCow.__init__ not MetaCow__new__.

share|improve this answer
    
This isn't what he asked at all, he obviously already knows how to do this. You can also do it in __init__ or __new__ without a decorator or metaclass. –  agf Sep 2 '11 at 11:55
    
Please reread the OP's question carefully. –  HappyLeapSecond Sep 2 '11 at 12:21
    
His clarification re-emphasizes he doesn't want to do this (even though it sounds like he's making a design error) –  agf Sep 2 '11 at 12:22
    
I'm hoping we can arrive at a better design by encouring the OP to explain why simple does not work. Btw, both your answers also rely on the creation of an instance which is what the OP said he did not want. –  HappyLeapSecond Sep 2 '11 at 12:28
    
no, the metaclass one actually works without creating an instance -- the metaclass' __new__ is when the class is created, not the instance is created. I just didn't show that. Edited for clarity –  agf Sep 2 '11 at 12:30

Two methods to to do what you want:

  • You can override the __getattr__ method in any class to return anything you desire when you ask for the value of an attribute.
  • You can use a property, which has a getter that returns the object you want it to return.

Both __getattr__ methods and properties are inherited.

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