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I have 5 text field in 5 rows like this..

<div class="dt_distance_slab">
     <g:textField class ="number distanceSlab1" name="distanceSlabCost1" id = "distanceSlabCost1"  value=""/> 
  </div>
<div class="dt_distance_slab">
     <g:textField class ="number distanceSlab2" name="distanceSlabCost2" id = "distanceSlabCost2"  value=""/> 
  </div>
  <div class="dt_distance_slab">
     <g:textField class ="number distanceSlab3" name="distanceSlabCost3" id = "distanceSlabCost3"  value=""/> 
  </div>
   <div class="dt_distance_slab">
     <g:textField class ="number distanceSlab4" name="distanceSlabCost4" id = "distanceSlabCost4"  value=""/> 
  </div>
    <div class="dt_distance_slab">
     <g:textField class ="number distanceSlab5" name="distanceSlabCost5" id = "distanceSlabCost5"  value=""/> 
  </div>

here all fields are optional.. i want to put validation like if user wants to enter the value.. he cannot skip a row in between ... if he want to enter value for a text field ,previous text field must have value..

validation will be done on submitting the form

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Is this actually the generated HTML code? Looks like you are using GWT or something in which the textField will later be replaced by a standard HTML <input>. –  Sebastian Wramba Sep 2 '11 at 12:10
    
yes.. its Gsp(groovy server pages) –  maaz Sep 2 '11 at 12:12
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try with this code:

$(document).ready(function(){
    //assuming the validation fires on the click of a button
    $("#btnSubmit").click(function(){ 
        //set valid variable to true
        var blnIsValid = true;
        //loop through each of the text boxes
        $(":text[class^='number']").each(function(i){
            //start validating from the second text box
            if(i > 0) {
                var curTxtBox = $(this);
                var prevTxtBox =  $(":text[class^='number']:eq("+ (i-1) +")");
                if($.trim(curTxtBox.val()) != "" && $.trim(prevTxtBox.val()) == "") {
                    alert("Enter value for previous distance");
                    //set focus on the text box
                    prevTxtBox.focus();
                    //set valid variable to false
                    blnIsValid = false;
                    //exit the loop
                    return false;
                }
            }
        });
        return blnIsValid;
    });
});

Here's a working example in jsFiddle

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1  
It's more robust and flexible to fire validation on the submit event of the form, rather than the click event of the submit button - it will handle the validation, no matter how the form is submitted. –  Beejamin Sep 2 '11 at 12:37
    
@Beejamin, i've never worked with the submit event before so i can't say much on the subject. Could you point me towards an article/page which explains these? Would help me in understanding the differences between click and submit in terms of validation. –  jSang Sep 2 '11 at 12:41
1  
Basically, submit works at the level of the form - so, however the form is submitted, whether by clicking a button, with a key-press, or programmatically (by another piece of javascript), the event will fire, and you get an opportunity to do your validation. If you attach validation to click events, you need to make sure you always attach to all buttons, and don't ever submit the form in any other way. You can still use all the same code, just fire it with the submit event instead. –  Beejamin Sep 6 '11 at 16:20
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Would you get a better user experience by preventing input in the fields that doesn't have a preceeding value? If all the fields except the first one is disabled by default, you could enable the next one on the blur event.

$('input:gt(1)').attr('disabled','disabled');
var fields = $('input');
$('input').blur(function(){
  var $this = $(this);
  if($this.val() != ''){
    fields.eq($this.index()+1).attr('disabled','');
  }
});
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I would actually hide the others (except the very next one which would contain descriptive text that would disappear as soon as the user started typing (and then the next box would appear). –  j3frea Sep 12 '11 at 12:03
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Borrowing heavily from jSang's answer and I'd do it like this:

$(document).ready(function(){
    //assuming the validation fires on the click of a button
    $("#btnSubmit").click(function(){
        var haveEmpty = false;
        var blnIsValid = true;
        $(":text[class^='number']").each(function(i){
            if( $(this).val() != "" )
            {
                if( haveEmpty )
                {
                   blnIsValid = false;
                   //need to do something to let the user know validation failed here
                }
            }
            else
                haveEmpty = true;
        });
        return blnIsValid;
    });
});
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