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I am updating and adding items from a feed(which can have about 40000 items) to the datastore 200 items at a time, the problem is that the feed can change and some items might be deleted from the feed. I have this code:

class FeedEntry(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty(required=True)

def updateFeed(offset, number=200):
    response = fetchFeed(offset, number)
    feedItems = parseFeed(response)
    feedEntriesToAdd = []
    for item in feedItems:
        feedEntriesToAdd.append(
            FeedEntry(key_name=item.id, name=item.name)
        )
    db.put(feedEntriesToAdd)

How do I find out which items were not in the feed and delete them from the datastore? I thought about creating a list of items(in datastore) and just remove from there all the items that I updated and the ones left will be the ones to delete. - but that seems rather slow.

PS: All item.id are unique for that feed item and are consistent.

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1  
Easiest is probably anything older than the datetime at which you started, isn't it? Or provided that you aren't updating constantly, actually a time a little before that might be prudent, to avoid any clock skew errors or similar. Use a DateTimeProperty with auto_now=True. –  Steve Jessop Sep 2 '11 at 12:36
    
And delete all entities updated before I started? –  Shedokan Sep 2 '11 at 12:42
1  
Yes. Or maybe set an "I don't care about anything before datetime X" value somewhere, and use that as a filter in all your queries for that entity kind. Might make it easier to deal with something going wrong in future, if you haven't just emptied your database due to failing to extract any items from the feed. –  Steve Jessop Sep 2 '11 at 12:50
    
But that's just a waste of datastore space(which is costly) don't you think? –  Shedokan Sep 2 '11 at 12:53
1  
Well, you can delete them eventually of course, it's just that I've written code that updates a database from a feed before, and it's a bit annoying when the feed provider glitches and serves you an empty feed temporarily. Entirely up to you whether the cost of a "backup" is worth it, and whether it even makes sense to consider that a glitch rather than a genuine update to say that there are no longer any items. –  Steve Jessop Sep 2 '11 at 13:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you add a DateTimeProperty with auto_now=True, it will record the last modified time of each entity. Since you update every item in the feed, by the time you've finished they will all have times after the moment you started, so anything with a date before then isn't in the feed any more.

Xavier's generation counter is just as good - all we need is something guaranteed to increase between refreshes, and never decrease during a refresh.

Not sure from the docs, but I expect a DateTimeProperty is bigger than an IntegerProperty. The latter is a 64 bit integer, so they might be the same size, or it may be that DateTimeProperty stores several integers. A group post suggests maybe it's 10 bytes as opposed to 8.

But remember that by adding an extra property that you do queries on, you're adding another index anyway, so the difference in size of the field is diluted as a proportion of the overhead. Further, 40k times a few bytes isn't much even at $0.24/G/month.

With either a generation or a datetime, you don't necessarily have to delete the data immediately. Your other queries could filter on date/generation of the most recent refresh, meaning that you don't have to delete data immediately. If the feed (or your parsing of it) goes funny and fails to produce any items, or only produces a few, it might be useful to have the last refresh lying around as a backup. Depends entirely on the app whether it's worth having.

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I would add a generation counter

class FeedEntry(db.Model):
    name = db.StringProperty(required=True)
    generation = db.IntegerProperty(required=True)
def updateFeed(offset, generation, number=200):
    response = fetchFeed(offset, number)
    feedItems = parseFeed(response)
    feedEntriesToAdd = []
    for item in feedItems:
        feedEntriesToAdd.append(
            FeedEntry(key_name=item.id, name=item.name,generation=generation)
        )
    db.put(feedEntriesToAdd)
def deleteOld(generation):
    q = db.GqlQuery("SELECT * FROM FeedEntry " +
            "WHERE generation != :1" ,generation )
    db.delete(generation)
share|improve this answer
    
What is a "generation tag"? and you forgot a comma at the def updateFeed –  Shedokan Sep 2 '11 at 15:31
1  
a generation tag is just an int you increase between two parsing it helps to distinct which parsing is the current and which is older. In fact you could use only two int but I thing increasing is better –  Xavier Combelle Sep 2 '11 at 15:49
    
this is almost as good as Steve Jessop's idea, but your relies on the feeds not giving me the same item on the same update cycle. which sometimes does happen in my case –  Shedokan Sep 2 '11 at 17:33
    
I don't understand what you means by the feeds not giving me the same item on the same update cycle. –  Xavier Combelle Sep 2 '11 at 18:12
    
I fetch 100 items at offset 0, then the feed is updated and one item is added in that offset so the 100th item would also show up when I fetch 100 items at offset 100 because it has moved up. –  Shedokan Sep 2 '11 at 18:16

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