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I have a big file and the lines pattern is given below:

MDQ[11:15],IO,MDQ[10:14],,,,MDQ[12:16],TPR_AAWD[11:15]

I want to modify this file like given below:

MDQ[11],IO,MDQ[10],,,,MDQ[12],TPR_AAWD[11]
MDQ[12],IO,MDQ[11],,,,MDQ[13],TPR_AAWD[12]
MDQ[13],IO,MDQ[12],,,,MDQ[14],TPR_AAWD[13]
MDQ[14],IO,MDQ[13],,,,MDQ[15],TPR_AAWD[14]

How i can implement this in sed/awk/perl/csh/vim? Please help

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2  
What have you tried? –  eugene y Sep 2 '11 at 12:36
    
This would appear to be five questions. –  Prince Goulash Sep 2 '11 at 12:42
1  
Do you mean that you want to expand 1 line into 4 new lines, based on ranges inside the []? –  TLP Sep 2 '11 at 14:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk -F '[][]' '{
    split($2, a, /:/)
    split($4, b, /:/)
    split($6, c, /:/)
    split($8, d, /:/)
    for (i=0; i < a[2]-a[1]; i++) {
        printf("%s[%d]%s[%d]%s[%d]%s[%d]\n",
            $1, a[1]+i,
            $3, b[1]+i,
            $5, c[1]+i,
            $7, d[1]+i)
    }
}'
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Thanks for your quick answer... It works fine.... –  joshy Sep 2 '11 at 13:06
    
hi glenn jackman, can you please explain the meaning of '[][]' (field seperator ) in the first line of script? –  joshy Sep 5 '11 at 5:26
    
In awk, the field separator can be a regular expression. I want to use either [ or ] as the field separator, so I want to put them into a character list ([...]). If you want to put a right bracket into a character list, it has to be the first character, so you get [][], meaning "open character list, right bracket character, left bracket character, close character list". –  glenn jackman Sep 6 '11 at 1:58

Hope the below helps:

sed -e 's/:[0-9]*//g'
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