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I am trying to create a new MyClass instance in MyClass's definition.

Why does this code fail and how can achieve it?

class MyClass:
        def __init__(self):
                self.child=MyClass()

mc=MyClass()
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1  
You can't. What are you actually trying to do? –  Winston Ewert Sep 2 '11 at 12:47
    
I am creating a tree, which can have children. And they are of the same class. –  xiaohan2012 Sep 2 '11 at 12:51
1  
This approach would loop endlessly (if it would work). –  rplnt Sep 2 '11 at 13:03
1  
They can have children. If you create it in a constructor like that it they will always have children. You should assign self.child = None and only assign self.child to something when they should have children. –  Winston Ewert Sep 2 '11 at 13:45
1  
As a side note, it is best always to create new classes inheriting from object rather than nothing (class MyClass(object):...) so that you're using new-style classes. –  Mike Graham Sep 2 '11 at 13:55

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Well, it fails because it has infinite recursion. Think about it, if every MyClass has a child which is a MyClass, it will go on for infinity!

You can resolve this a couple of ways. First, you can have a parameter to the constructor:

class MyClass:
   def __init__(self, create = True):
      if create:
         self.child = MyClass(False)

mc = MyClass()

Or, you can have another, external method:

class MyClass:
    def set_child(self,child = None):
        # I prefer to make child optional for ease of use.
        child = MyClass() if child is None else child
        self.child=child

mc=MyClass()
mc.set_child()

I personally prefer the first solution as it means that outside objects don't need to know anything about the class. Of course, you could combine the two:

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self, create):
        if create:
            self.set_child(create=False)

    def set_child(self,child = None, create = True):
        child = MyClass(create) if child is None else child
        self.child=child

mc=MyClass()

This way mc has a child by default and you have the option of setting the child whenever you like.

Then there is also the "let's create a certain number" approach:

class MyClass:
    def __init__(self, count = 10):
        count -= 1
        if count:
           # the first child gets the value 9.
           # the second gets 8.
           # when the count gets to 0, stop!
           self.child = MyClass(count)

Aside: If you want to get an object's class, you can use the value obj.__class__. That will output MyClass in all of the examples above.

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Quite comprehensive and illustrative. –  xiaohan2012 Sep 2 '11 at 14:33

You're making an infinitely recursing call — MyClass is creating another MyClass during initialization, and thus it recurses infinitely.

You may want to do something like:

class MyClass:
    def create_child(self):
        self.child=MyClass()

mc=MyClass()
mc.create_child()

If you're feeling particularly naughty, you could try:

class MyClass(object):
    @property
    def child(self):
        if self._child is None: self._child = MyClass()
        return self._child

    def __init__(self):
        self._child=None

mc=MyClass()
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MyClass is creating another MyClass. I do not quite understand it. Can you explain it more? The code you provide is useful, thanks.:-) –  xiaohan2012 Sep 2 '11 at 12:47
    
Oh, it makes sense to me now. :-) –  xiaohan2012 Sep 2 '11 at 12:48
    
Asides, can you tell what the usage of @property is called? Thanks. It is new to me. –  xiaohan2012 Sep 2 '11 at 12:58
    
It is a 'decorator': ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-cpdecor/index.html –  Don Sep 2 '11 at 15:21

What you did there is actualy recursive, the new isntance of MyClass will create a new instance that will in turn create a new one, etc ... Soo I supose that is why your code fails, I can't tell for sure since you didn't post the error message.

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I suggest to define two classes:

class MyClass(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.child = MyChildClass()
    ...many other methods...

class MyChildClass(MyClass):
    def __init__(self):
        pass

I think that if two classes must behave in two different ways, they must be different (although one can subclass the other)

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This seems precarious and unnecessary to me. –  Mike Graham Sep 2 '11 at 14:45

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