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I have an object x. I'd like to copy it as object y, such that changes to y do not modify x.

What's the most elegant way of doing this in JavaScript?

Edit: I realize that copying objects derived from built-in JavaScript objects will result in extra, unwanted properties. This isn't a problem, since I'm copying one of my own, literal-constructed objects.

share|improve this question
21  
See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/122102/… –  Niyaz Jun 21 '11 at 10:13
26  
For JSON, I use mObj=JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(jsonObject)); –  Lord Loh. Feb 2 '13 at 10:09
3  
lol i never knew objects were not copied but passed by reference. –  Muhammad Umer Aug 5 '13 at 3:37
9  
@MuhammadUmer - I guess it's lucky you found out now before it bit you on the tucchus! –  EmacsFodder Aug 6 '13 at 6:59

31 Answers 31

up vote 489 down vote accepted

To do this for any object in JavaScript will not be simple or straightforward. You will run into the problem of erroneously picking up attributes from the object's prototype that should be left in the prototype and not copied to the new instance. If, for instance, you are adding a clone method to Object.prototype, as some answers depict, you will need to explicitly skip that attribute. But what if there are other additional methods added to Object.prototype, or other intermediate prototypes, that you don't know about? In that case, you will copy attributes you shouldn't, so you need to detect unforeseen, non-local attributes with the hasOwnProperty method.

In addition to non-enumerable attributes, you'll encounter a tougher problem when you try to copy objects that have hidden properties. For example, prototype is a hidden property of a function. Also, an object's prototype is referenced with the attribute __proto__, which is also hidden, and will not be copied by a for/in loop iterating over the source object's attributes. I think __proto__ might be specific to Firefox's JavaScript interpreter and it may be something different in other browsers, but you get the picture. Not everything is enumerable. You can copy a hidden attribute if you know its name, but I don't know of any way to discover it automatically.

Yet another snag in the quest for an elegant solution is the problem of setting up the prototype inheritance correctly. If your source object's prototype is Object, then simply creating a new general object with {} will work, but if the source's prototype is some descendant of Object, then you are going to be missing the additional members from that prototype which you skipped using the hasOwnProperty filter, or which were in the prototype, but weren't enumerable in the first place. One solution might be to call the source object's constructor property to get the initial copy object and then copy over the attributes, but then you still will not get non-enumerable attributes. For example, a Date object stores its data as a hidden member:

function clone(obj) {
    if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;
    var copy = obj.constructor();
    for (var attr in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = obj[attr];
    }
    return copy;
}

var d1 = new Date();

/* Wait for 5 seconds. */
var start = (new Date()).getTime();
while ((new Date()).getTime() - start < 5000);


var d2 = clone(d1);
alert("d1 = " + d1.toString() + "\nd2 = " + d2.toString());

The date string for d1 will be 5 seconds behind that of d2. A way to make one Date the same as another is by calling the setTime method, but that is specific to the Date class. I don't think there is a bullet-proof general solution to this problem, though I would be happy to be wrong!

When I had to implement general deep copying I ended up compromising by assuming that I would only need to copy a plain Object, Array, Date, String, Number, or Boolean. The last 3 types are immutable, so I could perform a shallow copy and not worry about it changing. I further assumed that any elements contained in Object or Array would also be one of the 6 simple types in that list. This can be accomplished with code like the following:

function clone(obj) {
    var copy;

    // Handle the 3 simple types, and null or undefined
    if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;

    // Handle Date
    if (obj instanceof Date) {
        copy = new Date();
        copy.setTime(obj.getTime());
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Array
    if (obj instanceof Array) {
        copy = [];
        for (var i = 0, len = obj.length; i < len; i++) {
            copy[i] = clone(obj[i]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Object
    if (obj instanceof Object) {
        copy = {};
        for (var attr in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = clone(obj[attr]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    throw new Error("Unable to copy obj! Its type isn't supported.");
}

The above function will work adequately for the 6 simple types I mentioned, as long as the data in the objects and arrays form a tree structure. That is, there isn't more than one reference to the same data in the object. For example:

// This would be cloneable:
var tree = {
    "left"  : { "left" : null, "right" : null, "data" : 3 },
    "right" : null,
    "data"  : 8
};

// This would kind-of work, but you would get 2 copies of the 
// inner node instead of 2 references to the same copy
var directedAcylicGraph = {
    "left"  : { "left" : null, "right" : null, "data" : 3 },
    "data"  : 8
};
directedAcyclicGraph["right"] = directedAcyclicGraph["left"];

// Cloning this would cause a stack overflow due to infinite recursion:
var cylicGraph = {
    "left"  : { "left" : null, "right" : null, "data" : 3 },
    "data"  : 8
};
cylicGraph["right"] = cylicGraph;

It will not be able to handle any JavaScript object, but it may be sufficient for many purposes as long as you don't assume that it will just work for anything you throw at it.

share|improve this answer
60  
+1 Best answer I've seen. –  cwallenpoole May 20 '10 at 18:39
2  
@javierfp: I think it is reachable. The instanceof operator works by checking the objects prototype chain (according to the Mozilla Javascript reference: developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/Special/…). I suppose that someone could modify the prototype chain to no longer include Object. That would be unusual, but would cause the error to be thrown. –  A. Levy Jan 21 '11 at 21:44
35  
This is a fantastic answer, and it highlights just why Javascript it so broken. Immutability is a desirable property in programming and if you have to go to these lengths to achieve it, something is seriously wrong. –  Sean Seefried Feb 24 '12 at 5:42
4  
almost worked fine in a nodejs - just had to change the line for (var i = 0, var len = obj.length; i < len; ++i) { to for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; ++i) { –  Trindaz Mar 28 '12 at 0:08
4  
For future googlers: same deep copy, passing references recursively instead of using 'return' statements at gist.github.com/2234277 –  Trindaz Mar 29 '12 at 6:48

I believe if you're using jQuery, you can do this:

var copiedObject = {};
jQuery.extend(copiedObject,originalObject);

subsequent changes to the copiedObject will not affect the originalObject, and vice versa.

share|improve this answer
105  
or even: var copiedObject = jQuery.extend({},originalObject); –  Grant McLean May 8 '11 at 2:11
46  
Also useful to specify true as the first param for deep copy: jQuery.extend(true, {}, originalObject); –  Will Shaver Jun 21 '11 at 0:19
5  
Yes, I found this link helpful (same solution as Pascal) stackoverflow.com/questions/122102/… –  Garry English Nov 16 '11 at 16:31

If you do not use functions within your object, a very simple one liner can be the following:

var clone_of_a = JSON.parse( JSON.stringify( a ) );

This works for all kind of objects containing objects, arrays, strings, booleans and numbers.

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9  
Note that this can only be used for testing. Firstly, it's far from optimal in terms of time and memory consumption. Secondly, not all browsers have this methods. –  Nux Aug 12 '13 at 18:56
2  
You could always include JSON2.js or JSON3.js. You would need them for your app anyway. But I do agree this might not be the best solution, since JSON.stringify does not include inherited properties. –  Tim Hong Feb 13 at 6:44
3  
works, easy, nice. –  OneSolitaryNoob Apr 22 at 7:15
2  
@Nux, Why not optimal in terms of time and memory? MiJyn says: "The reason why this method is slower than shallow copying (on a deep object) is that this method, by definition, deep copies. But since JSON is implemented in native code (in most browsers), this will be considerably faster than using any other javascript-based deep copying solution, and may sometimes be faster than a javascript-based shallow copying technique (see: jsperf.com/cloning-an-object/79)." stackoverflow.com/questions/122102/… –  BeauCielBleu May 14 at 15:27

There are many answers, but none that mentions Object.create from ECMAScript 5, which admittedly does not give you an exact copy, but sets the source as the prototype of the new object.

Thus, this is not an exact answer to the question, but it is a one-line solution and thus elegant. And it works best for 2 cases:

  1. Where such inheritance is useful (duh!)
  2. Where the source object won't be modified, thus making the relation between the 2 objects a non issue.

Example:

var foo = { a : 1 };
var bar = Object.create(foo);
foo.a; // 1
bar.a; // 1
foo.a = 2;
bar.a; // 2 - prototype changed
bar.a = 3;
foo.a; // Still 2, since setting bar.a makes it an "own" property

Why do I consider this solution to be superior? It's native, thus no looping, no recursion. However, older browsers will need a polyfill.

share|improve this answer
9  
This is prototypal inheritance, not cloning. These are completely different things. The new object doesn't have any of it's own properties, it just points to the prototype's properties. The point of cloning is to create a fresh new object that doesn't reference any properties in another object. –  d13 Jan 16 at 16:18

If you're okay with a shallow copy, the underscore.js library has a clone method.

y = _.clone(x);
share|improve this answer
3  
And lodash has a cloneDeep –  dule Jun 4 '13 at 0:11

One particular "un-elegant" solution is to use JSON encoding to make deep copies of objects that do not have member methods. The methodology is to JSON encode your target object, then by decoding it, you get the copy you are looking for. You can decode as many times as you want to make as many copies as you need.

Of course, functions do not belong in JSON, so this only works for objects without member methods.

This methodology was perfect for my use case, since I'm storing JSON blobs in a key-value store, and when they are exposed as objects in a JavaScript API, each object actually contains a copy of the original state of the object so we can calculate the delta after the caller has mutated the exposed object.

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2  
Functions are not part of the JSON spec becuase they are not a secure (or smart) way to transfer data, which is what JSON was made for. I know the native JSON encoder in Firefox simply ignores functions passed to it, but I'm not sure about the behavior of others. –  Kris Walker Oct 30 '09 at 10:27
17  
There's nothing more inelegant than the use of the word unelegant. –  Kevin Laity Jan 26 '12 at 20:18
1  
@mark: { 'foo': function() { return 1; } } is a literal-constructed object. –  abarnert Aug 14 '12 at 1:58

A.Levy's answer is almost complete, here is my little contribution: there is a way how to handle recursive references, see this line

if(this[attr]==this) copy[attr] = copy;

If the object is XML DOM element, we must use cloneNode instead

if(this.cloneNode) return this.cloneNode(true);

Inspired by A.Levy's exhaustive study and Calvin's prototyping approach, I offer this solution:

Object.prototype.clone = function() {
  if(this.cloneNode) return this.cloneNode(true);
  var copy = this instanceof Array ? [] : {};
  for(var attr in this) {
    if(typeof this[attr] == "function" || this[attr]==null || !this[attr].clone)
      copy[attr] = this[attr];
    else if(this[attr]==this) copy[attr] = copy;
    else copy[attr] = this[attr].clone();
  }
  return copy;
}

Date.prototype.clone = function() {
  var copy = new Date();
  copy.setTime(this.getTime());
  return copy;
}

Number.prototype.clone = 
Boolean.prototype.clone =
String.prototype.clone = function() {
  return this;
}

See also Andy Burke's note in the answers.

share|improve this answer

You can clone an object and remove any reference from the previous one using a single line of code. Simply do:

var obj1 = { text: 'moo1' };
var obj2 = Object.create(obj1); // Creates a new clone without references

obj2.text = 'moo2'; // Only updates obj2's text property

console.log(obj1, obj2); // Outputs: obj1: {text:'moo1'}, obj2: {text:'moo2'}

For browsers / engines that do not currently support Object.create you can use this polyfill:

// Polyfill Object.create if it does not exist
if (!Object.create) {
    Object.create = function (o) {
        var F = function () {};
        F.prototype = o;
        return new F();
    };
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Object.create(...) seems definitely the way to go. –  René Nyffenegger Jun 30 at 14:49

From this article: How to copy arrays and objects in Javascript by Brian Huisman:

Object.prototype.clone = function() {
  var newObj = (this instanceof Array) ? [] : {};
  for (var i in this) {
    if (i == 'clone') continue;
    if (this[i] && typeof this[i] == "object") {
      newObj[i] = this[i].clone();
    } else newObj[i] = this[i]
  } return newObj;
};
share|improve this answer
2  
This is close, but doesn't work for any object. Try cloning a Date object with this. Not all properties are enumerable, so they will not all show up in the for/in loop. –  A. Levy Apr 8 '09 at 4:17
2  
@iPadDeveloper2011 The code above had a bug in it where it created a global variable called 'i' '(for i in this)', rather than '(for var i in this)'. I have enough karma to edit and it and fix it so I did. –  mikemaccana Sep 22 '12 at 22:09
1  
@Calvin: this should be created an a non-enumerable property, otherwise 'clone' will appear in 'for' loops. –  mikemaccana Oct 1 '12 at 10:54

Here is a function you can use.

function clone(obj) {
    if(obj == null || typeof(obj) != 'object')
        return obj;    
    var temp = new obj.constructor(); 
    for(var key in obj)
        temp[key] = clone(obj[key]);    
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This answer is pretty close, but not quite correct. If you try cloning a Date object, you will not get the same date because the call to the Date constructor function initializes the new Date with the current date/time. That value isn't enumerable and won't be copied by the for/in loop. –  A. Levy Apr 8 '09 at 4:21

Jan Turoň's answer above is very close, and may be the best to use in a browser due to compatibility issues, but it will potentially cause some strange enumeration issues. For instance, executing:

for ( var i in someArray ) { ... }

Will assign the clone() method to i after iterating through the elements of the array. Here's an adaptation that avoids the enumeration and works with node.js:

Object.defineProperty( Object.prototype, "clone", {
    value: function() {
        if ( this.cloneNode )
        {
            return this.cloneNode( true );
        }

        var copy = this instanceof Array ? [] : {};
        for( var attr in this )
        {
            if ( typeof this[ attr ] == "function" || this[ attr ] == null || !this[ attr ].clone )
            {
                copy[ attr ] = this[ attr ];
            }
            else if ( this[ attr ] == this )
            {
                copy[ attr ] = copy;
            }
            else
            {
                copy[ attr ] = this[ attr ].clone();
            }
        }
        return copy;
    }
});

Object.defineProperty( Date.prototype, "clone", {
    value: function() {
        var copy = new Date();
        copy.setTime( this.getTime() );
        return copy;
    }
});

Object.defineProperty( Number.prototype, "clone", { value: function() { return this; } } );
Object.defineProperty( Boolean.prototype, "clone", { value: function() { return this; } } );
Object.defineProperty( String.prototype, "clone", { value: function() { return this; } } );

This avoids making the clone() method enumerable because defineProperty() defaults enumerable to false.

share|improve this answer

If there are no circular dependencies in your object, I suggest using one of the other answers or jQuery's copy methods, as they all seem quite effective.

If there are circular dependencies (i.e., two sub-objects link to each other), you are kind of screwed as there is (from a theoretical perspective) no way to solve this issue elegantly.

share|improve this answer
2  
Actually, Python's object serialization handles circular references by keeping track of nodes in the object graph that it has already processed. You could use that approach to implement a robust copy routine. It would be a little more work though! –  A. Levy May 20 '10 at 18:21

Using Prototype framework:

var y = Object.clone(x);

Considering clone implementation:

...
Object.extend = function(destination, source) {
  for (var property in source)
    destination[property] = source[property];
  return destination;
};
...
clone: function(object) {
    return Object.extend({ }, object);
  }
...
share|improve this answer
12  
this Date object is killing all answers! –  Sepehr Lajevardi Apr 10 '09 at 22:37

Since mindeavor stated that the object to be cloned is a 'literal-constructed' object, a solution might be to simply generate the object multiple times rather than cloning an instance of the object:

function createMyObject()
{
    var myObject =
    {
        ...
    };
    return myObject;
}

var myObjectInstance1 = createMyObject();
var myObjectInstance2 = createMyObject();
share|improve this answer

Using Lodash:

var y = _.clone(x, true);
share|improve this answer

I just wanted to add to all the Object.create solutions in this post, that this does not work in the desired way with nodejs.

In Firefox the result of

var a = {"test":"test"};
var b = Object.create(a);
console.log(b);´

is

{test:"test"}.

In nodejs it is

{}
share|improve this answer

This is an adaptation of A. Levy's code to also handle the cloning of functions and multiple/cyclic references - what this means is that if two properties in the tree which is cloned are references of the same object, the cloned object tree will have these properties point to one and the same clone of the referenced object. This also solves the case of cyclic dependencies which, if left unhandled, leads to an infinite loop. The complexity of the algorithm is O(n)

function clone(obj){
    var clonedObjectsArray = [];
    var originalObjectsArray = []; //used to remove the unique ids when finished
    var next_objid = 0;

    function objectId(obj) {
        if (obj == null) return null;
        if (obj.__obj_id == undefined){
            obj.__obj_id = next_objid++;
            originalObjectsArray[obj.__obj_id] = obj;
        }
        return obj.__obj_id;
    }

    function cloneRecursive(obj) {
        if (null == obj || typeof obj == "string" || typeof obj == "number" || typeof obj == "boolean") return obj;

        // Handle Date
        if (obj instanceof Date) {
            var copy = new Date();
            copy.setTime(obj.getTime());
            return copy;
        }

        // Handle Array
        if (obj instanceof Array) {
            var copy = [];
            for (var i = 0; i < obj.length; ++i) {
                copy[i] = cloneRecursive(obj[i]);
            }
            return copy;
        }

        // Handle Object
        if (obj instanceof Object) {
            if (clonedObjectsArray[objectId(obj)] != undefined)
                return clonedObjectsArray[objectId(obj)];

            var copy;
            if (obj instanceof Function)//Handle Function
                copy = function(){return obj.apply(this, arguments);};
            else
                copy = {};

            clonedObjectsArray[objectId(obj)] = copy;

            for (var attr in obj)
                if (attr != "__obj_id" && obj.hasOwnProperty(attr))
                    copy[attr] = cloneRecursive(obj[attr]);                 

            return copy;
        }       


        throw new Error("Unable to copy obj! Its type isn't supported.");
    }
    var cloneObj = cloneRecursive(obj);



    //remove the unique ids
    for (var i = 0; i < originalObjectsArray.length; i++)
    {
        delete originalObjectsArray[i].__obj_id;
    };

    return cloneObj;
}

Some quick tests

var auxobj = {
    prop1 : "prop1 aux val", 
    prop2 : ["prop2 item1", "prop2 item2"]
    };

var obj = new Object();
obj.prop1 = "prop1_value";
obj.prop2 = [auxobj, auxobj, "some extra val", undefined];
obj.nr = 3465;
obj.bool = true;

obj.f1 = function (){
    this.prop1 = "prop1 val changed by f1";
};

objclone = clone(obj);

//some tests i've made
console.log("test number, boolean and string cloning: " + (objclone.prop1 == obj.prop1 && objclone.nr == obj.nr && objclone.bool == obj.bool));

objclone.f1();
console.log("test function cloning 1: " + (objclone.prop1 == 'prop1 val changed by f1'));
objclone.f1.prop = 'some prop';
console.log("test function cloning 2: " + (obj.f1.prop == undefined));

objclone.prop2[0].prop1 = "prop1 aux val NEW";
console.log("test multiple references cloning 1: " + (objclone.prop2[1].prop1 == objclone.prop2[0].prop1));
console.log("test multiple references cloning 2: " + (objclone.prop2[1].prop1 != obj.prop2[0].prop1));
share|improve this answer

One thing is certain... there is no elegant way. My contribution here is this link http://oranlooney.com/deep-copy-javascript/

I think this library is the most comprehensive and elegant solution. It is particularly focused on the prototype chain of the cloned objects. It includes a mechanism to easy describe custom cloning behavior for particular classes. The author explains that most of the time the default cloning mechanism which is provided works fine.

It also clones functions and handles cycles or multiple references.

I have recently suggested the author a solution to optimize the mechanism which handles cycles, from O(n^2) to O(n).

share|improve this answer
function clone(src, deep) {

    var toString = Object.prototype.toString;
    if(!src && typeof src != "object"){
        //any non-object ( Boolean, String, Number ), null, undefined, NaN
        return src;
    }

    //Honor native/custom clone methods
    if(src.clone && toString.call(src.clone) == "[object Function]"){
        return src.clone(deep);
    }

    //DOM Elements
    if(src.nodeType && toString.call(src.cloneNode) == "[object Function]"){
        return src.cloneNode(deep);
    }

    //Date
    if(toString.call(src) == "[object Date]"){
        return new Date(src.getTime());
    }

    //RegExp
    if(toString.call(src) == "[object RegExp]"){
        return new RegExp(src);
    }

    //Function
    if(toString.call(src) == "[object Function]"){
        //Wrap in another method to make sure == is not true;
        //Note: Huge performance issue due to closures, comment this :)
        return (function(){
            src.apply(this, arguments);
        });

    }

    var ret, index;
    //Array
    if(toString.call(src) == "[object Array]"){
        //[].slice(0) would soft clone
        ret = src.slice();
        if(deep){
            index = ret.length;
            while(index--){
                ret[index] = clone(ret[index], true);
            }
        }
    }
    //Object
    else {
        ret = src.constructor ? new src.constructor() : {};
        for (var prop in src) {
            ret[prop] = deep
                ? clone(src[prop], true)
                : src[prop];
        }
    }

    return ret;
};
share|improve this answer

Consult http://www.w3.org/html/wg/drafts/html/master/infrastructure.html#safe-passing-of-structured-data for the W3C's "Safe passing of structured data" algorithm, intended to be implemented by browsers for passing data to eg web workers. However, it has some limitations, in that it does not handle functions. See https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/DOM/The_structured_clone_algorithm for more information, including an alternative algorithm in JS which gets you part of the way there.

share|improve this answer

You can use functional closure to gain all the benefits of a deep copy, without a deep copy. It's a very different paradigm, but works well. Instead of trying to copy an existing object, just use a function to instantiate a new object when you need one.

First, create an function that returns an object

function template() {
  return {
    values: [1, 2, 3],
    nest: {x: {a: "a", b: "b"}, y: 100}
  };
}

Then create a simple shallow copy function

function copy(a, b) {
  Object.keys(b).forEach(function(key) {
    a[key] = b[key];
  });
}

Create a new object, and copy the template's properties onto it

var newObject = {}; 
copy(newObject, template());

But the above copy step is not necessary. All you need to do is this:

var newObject = template();

Now that you have a new object, test to see what its properties are:

console.log(Object.keys(newObject));

This displays:

["values", "nest"]

Yes, those are the newObject's own properties, not references to properties on another object. Let's just check:

console.log(newObject.nest.x.b);

This displays:

"b"

The newObject has acquired all of the template object's properties, but is free of any dependency chain.

http://jsbin.com/ISUTIpoC/1/edit?js,console

I added this example to encourage some debate, so please add some comments :)

share|improve this answer

I came to this page due to the same question but I'm neither using JQuery and none of the clone-Methods worked for my own objects.

I'm aware my answer isn't related too strong to this question because it's a different approach. Instead of using clone-functions I use a create function. It worked for me for the following (unfortunately restricting) purposes:

  1. I use mostly JSP-generated Javascript
  2. I know in the beginning which Object must be generated (In my case it's Information from a Database which gets fetched once and needs to be deployed more often in the JS.

First I defined my Objects like this:

var obj= new Object();
obj.Type='Row';
obj.ID=1;
obj.Value='Blah blah';

Now I moved everything like:

function getObjSelektor(id_nummer,selected){
var obj = document.createElement("select");
obj.setAttribute("id","Selektor_"+id_nummer);
obj.setAttribute("name","Selektor");
obj.setAttribute("size","1");

var obj_opt_1 = document.createElement("option");
obj_opt_1.setAttribute("value","1");
if(1==selected)
    posopval_opt_1.setAttribute("selected","selected");
obj_opt_1.innerHTML="Blah blah";
obj.appendChild(obj_opt_1);

var obj_opt_2 = document.createElement("option");
obj_opt_2.setAttribute("value","2");
if(2==selected)
    obj_opt_2.setAttribute("selected","selected");
obj_opt_2.innerHTML="2nd Row";
obj.appendChild(obj_opt_2);

...

return obj;
}

And call the function in the regular code:

myDiv.getObjSelektor(getObjSelektor(anotherObject.ID));

As said this is a different approach which solved my issue for my purposes.

share|improve this answer

If you got an Object with Functions you can do it with JSONfn, see http://www.eslinstructor.net/jsonfn/.

var obj= {
    name:'Marvin',
    getName :  function(){
      return this.name;
    }
}
var cobj = JSONfn.parse(JSONfn.stringify(obj));
share|improve this answer
//
// creates 'clone' method on context object
//
//  var 
//     clon = Object.clone( anyValue );
//
!((function (propertyName, definition) {
    this[propertyName] = definition();
}).call(
    Object,
    "clone",
    function () {
        function isfn(fn) {
            return typeof fn === "function";
        }

        function isobj(o) {
            return o === Object(o);
        }

        function isarray(o) {
            return Object.prototype.toString.call(o) === "[object Array]";
        }

        function fnclon(fn) {
            return function () {
                fn.apply(this, arguments);
            };
        }

        function owns(obj, p) {
            return obj.hasOwnProperty(p);
        }

        function isemptyobj(obj) {
            for (var p in obj) {
                return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

        function isObject(o) {
            return Object.prototype.toString.call(o) === "[object Object]";
        }
        return function (input) {
            if (isfn(input)) {
                return fnclon(input);
            } else if (isobj(input)) {
                var cloned = {};
                for (var p in input) {
                    owns(Object.prototype, p)
                    || (
                        isfn(input[p])
                        && ( cloned[p] = function () { return input[p].apply(input, arguments); } )
                        || ( cloned[p] = input[p] )
                    );
                }
                if (isarray(input)) {
                    cloned.length = input.length;
                    "concat every filter forEach indexOf join lastIndexOf map pop push reduce reduceRight reverse shift slice some sort splice toLocaleString toString unshift"
                    .split(" ")
                    .forEach(
                      function (methodName) {
                        isfn( Array.prototype[methodName] )
                        && (
                            cloned[methodName] =
                            function () {
                                return Array.prototype[methodName].apply(cloned, arguments);
                            }
                        );
                      }
                    );
                }
                return isemptyobj(cloned)
                       ? (
                          isObject(input)
                          ? cloned
                          : input
                        )
                       : cloned;
            } else {
                return input;
            }
        };
    }
));
//
share|improve this answer
1  
Why would this answer be better than any of the other ones? –  BLaZuRE Jul 27 '13 at 20:51

The problem with copying an object that, eventually, may point at itself, can be solved with a simple check. Add this check, every time there is a copy action. It may be slow, but it should work.

I use a toType() function to return the object type, explicitly. I also have my own copyObj() function, which is rather similar in logic, which answers all three Object(), Array(), and Date() cases.

I run it in NodeJS.

NOT TESTED, YET.

// Returns true, if one of the parent's children is the target.
// This is useful, for avoiding copyObj() through an infinite loop!
function isChild(target, parent) {
  if (toType(parent) == '[object Object]') {
    for (var name in parent) {
      var curProperty = parent[name];

      // Direct child.
      if (curProperty = target) return true;

      // Check if target is a child of this property, and so on, recursively.
      if (toType(curProperty) == '[object Object]' || toType(curProperty) == '[object Array]') {
        if (isChild(target, curProperty)) return true;
      }
    }
  } else if (toType(parent) == '[object Array]') {
    for (var i=0; i < parent.length; i++) {
      var curItem = parent[i];

      // Direct child.
      if (curItem = target) return true;

      // Check if target is a child of this property, and so on, recursively.
      if (toType(curItem) == '[object Object]' || toType(curItem) == '[object Array]') {
        if (isChild(target, curItem)) return true;
      }
    }
  }

  return false;     // Not the target.
}
share|improve this answer

There are several issues with most solutions on the internet. So I decided to make a follow-up, which includes, why the accepted answer shouldn't be accepted.

starting situation

I want to deep-copy a Javascript Object with all of its children and their children and so on. But since I'm not kind of a normal developer, my Object has normal properties, circular structures and even nested objects.

So let's create a circular structure and a nested object first.

function Circ() {
    this.me = this;
}

function Nested(y) {
    this.y = y;
}

Let's bring everything together in an Object named a.

var a = {
    x: 'a',
    circ: new Circ(),
    nested: new Nested('a')
};

Next we want to copy a into a variable named b and mutate it.

var b = a;

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

You know what happened here, because if not you wouldn't even landed on this great question.

console.log(a, b);

a --> Object {
    x: "b",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

b --> Object {
    x: "b",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

Now let's find a solution.

JSON

The first attempt I tried was using JSON.

var b = JSON.parse( JSON.stringify( a ) );

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

Don't waste too much time on it, you'll get TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON.

Recursive copy (the accepted "answer")

Let's have a look at the accepted answer.

function cloneSO(obj) {
    // Handle the 3 simple types, and null or undefined
    if (null == obj || "object" != typeof obj) return obj;

    // Handle Date
    if (obj instanceof Date) {
        var copy = new Date();
        copy.setTime(obj.getTime());
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Array
    if (obj instanceof Array) {
        var copy = [];
        for (var i = 0, len = obj.length; i < len; i++) {
            copy[i] = cloneSO(obj[i]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    // Handle Object
    if (obj instanceof Object) {
        var copy = {};
        for (var attr in obj) {
            if (obj.hasOwnProperty(attr)) copy[attr] = cloneSO(obj[attr]);
        }
        return copy;
    }

    throw new Error("Unable to copy obj! Its type isn't supported.");
}

Looks good, heh? It's a recursive copy of the object and handles other types as well, like Date, but that wasn't a requirement.

var b = cloneSO(a);

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

Recursion and circular structures doesn't work well together... RangeError: Maximum call stack size exceeded

native solution

After arguing with my co-worker, my boss asked us what happend, and he found a simple solution after some googling. It's called Object.create.

var b = Object.create(a);

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

This solution was added to Javascript some time ago and even handles circular structure.

console.log(a, b);

a --> Object {
    x: "a",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

b --> Object {
    x: "b",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

... and you see, it didn't work with the nested structure inside.

polyfill for the native solution

There's a polyfill for Object.create in older browser just like the IE 8. It's something like recommended by Mozilla, and of course it's not perfect and results in the same problem as the native solution.

function F() {};
function clonePF(o) {
    F.prototype = o;
    return new F();
}

var b = clonePF(a);

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

I've put F outside the scope so we can have a look at what instanceof tells us.

console.log(a, b);

a --> Object {
    x: "a",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

b --> F {
    x: "b",
    circ: Circ {
        me: Circ { ... }
    },
    nested: Nested {
        y: "b"
    }
}

console.log(typeof a, typeof b);

a --> object
b --> object

console.log(a instanceof Object, b instanceof Object);

a --> true
b --> true

console.log(a instanceof F, b instanceof F);

a --> false
b --> true

Same problem as the native solution, but a little bit worse output.

the better (but not perfect) solution

When digging around, I found a similiar question (In Javascript, when performing a deep copy, how do I avoid a cycle, due to a property being "this"?) to this one, but with a way better solution.

function cloneDR(o) {
    const gdcc = "__getDeepCircularCopy__";
    if (o !== Object(o)) {
        return o; // primitive value
    }

    var set = gdcc in o,
        cache = o[gdcc],
        result;
    if (set && typeof cache == "function") {
        return cache();
    }
    // else
    o[gdcc] = function() { return result; }; // overwrite
    if (o instanceof Array) {
        result = [];
        for (var i=0; i<o.length; i++) {
            result[i] = cloneDR(o[i]);
        }
    } else {
        result = {};
        for (var prop in o)
            if (prop != gdcc)
                result[prop] = cloneDR(o[prop]);
            else if (set)
                result[prop] = cloneDR(cache);
    }
    if (set) {
        o[gdcc] = cache; // reset
    } else {
        delete o[gdcc]; // unset again
    }
    return result;
}

var b = cloneDR(a);

b.x = 'b';
b.nested.y = 'b';

And let's have a look at the output...

console.log(a, b);

a --> Object {
    x: "a",
    circ: Object {
        me: Object { ... }
    },
    nested: Object {
        y: "a"
    }
}

b --> Object {
    x: "b",
    circ: Object {
        me: Object { ... }
    },
    nested: Object {
        y: "b"
    }
}

console.log(typeof a, typeof b);

a --> object
b --> object

console.log(a instanceof Object, b instanceof Object);

a --> true
b --> true

console.log(a instanceof F, b instanceof F);

a --> false
b --> false

The requirements are matched, but there are still some smaller issues, including changing the instance of nested andcirc to Object.

The structure of trees that share a leaf won't be copied, they will become two independent leafes:

        [Object]                     [Object]
         /    \                       /    \
        /      \                     /      \
      |/_      _\|                 |/_      _\|  
  [Object]    [Object]   ===>  [Object]    [Object]
       \        /                 |           |
        \      /                  |           |
        _\|  |/_                 \|/         \|/
        [Object]               [Object]    [Object]

conclusion

The last solution using recursion and a cache, may not be the best, but it's a real deep-copy of the object. It handles simple properties, circular structures and nested object, but it will mess up the instance of them while cloning.

http://jsfiddle.net/einfallstoll/N4mr2/

share|improve this answer

From the Apple JavaScript Coding Guidelines:

// Create an inner object with a variable x whose default
// value is 3.
function innerObj()
{
        this.x = 3;
}
innerObj.prototype.clone = function() {
    var temp = new innerObj();
    for (myvar in this) {
        // this object does not contain any objects, so
        // use the lightweight copy code.
        temp[myvar] = this[myvar];
    }
    return temp;
}

// Create an outer object with a variable y whose default
// value is 77.
function outerObj()
{
        // The outer object contains an inner object.  Allocate it here.
        this.inner = new innerObj();
        this.y = 77;
}
outerObj.prototype.clone = function() {
    var temp = new outerObj();
    for (myvar in this) {
        if (this[myvar].clone) {
            // This variable contains an object with a
            // clone operator.  Call it to create a copy.
            temp[myvar] = this[myvar].clone();
        } else {
            // This variable contains a scalar value,
            // a string value, or an object with no
            // clone function.  Assign it directly.
            temp[myvar] = this[myvar];
        }
    }
    return temp;
}

// Allocate an outer object and assign non-default values to variables in
// both the outer and inner objects.
outer = new outerObj;
outer.inner.x = 4;
outer.y = 16;

// Clone the outer object (which, in turn, clones the inner object).
newouter = outer.clone();

// Verify that both values were copied.
alert('inner x is '+newouter.inner.x); // prints 4
alert('y is '+newouter.y); // prints 16

Steve

share|improve this answer
2  
Object attributes which did not have a clone method would be shallow-copied by this code. Thus, changes to the original can affect the copy. So this will not solve the problem. –  A. Levy Apr 8 '09 at 4:26

In my code I frequently define a function (_) to handle copies so that I can pass "by value" to functions. This code creates a deep copy but maintains inheritance. It also keeps track of sub-copies so that self-referential objects can be copied without an infinite loop. Feel free to use it.

It might not be the most elegant, but it hasn't failed me yet.

_ = function(oReferance) {
  var aReferances = new Array();
  var getPrototypeOf = function(oObject) {
    if(typeof(Object.getPrototypeOf)!=="undefined") return Object.getPrototypeOf(oObject);
    var oTest = new Object();
    if(typeof(oObject.__proto__)!=="undefined"&&typeof(oTest.__proto__)!=="undefined"&&oTest.__proto__===Object.prototype) return oObject.__proto__;
    if(typeof(oObject.constructor)!=="undefined"&&typeof(oTest.constructor)!=="undefined"&&oTest.constructor===Object&&typeof(oObject.constructor.prototype)!=="undefined") return oObject.constructor.prototype;
    return Object.prototype;
  };
  var recursiveCopy = function(oSource) {
    if(typeof(oSource)!=="object") return oSource;
    if(oSource===null) return null;
    for(var i=0;i<aReferances.length;i++) if(aReferances[i][0]===oSource) return aReferances[i][1];
    var Copy = new Function();
    Copy.prototype = getPrototypeOf(oSource);
    var oCopy = new Copy();
    aReferances.push([oSource,oCopy]);
    for(sPropertyName in oSource) if(oSource.hasOwnProperty(sPropertyName)) oCopy[sPropertyName] = recursiveCopy(oSource[sPropertyName]);
    return oCopy;
  };
  return recursiveCopy(oReferance);
};

// Examples:
Wigit = function(){};
Wigit.prototype.bInThePrototype = true;
A = new Wigit();
A.nCoolNumber = 7;
B = _(A);
B.nCoolNumber = 8; // A.nCoolNumber is still 7
B.bInThePrototype // true
B instanceof Wigit // true
share|improve this answer

You don't get much more elegant than this in pure JS:

function copy(variable)
{
    var newVariable= {};
    for (var i in variable)
        newVariable[i] = variable[i];

    return newVariable;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
This is a shallow copy. –  Roy Tinker Jul 22 '13 at 23:58

My favorite & elegant JS objects clone solution is

function CloneObject() {}
function cloneObject(o) {
   CloneObject.prototype = o;
   return new CloneObject();
}

Use cloneObject(object) to get a clone of JS object.

Unlike many copy solutions this clone keeps prototype relationship in cloned object.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think this not answer the question posted by the op. code var o1 = {a: 1} var o2 = cloneObject(o1) o2.b = 2 console.log(o1) // will be {a:1, b:2} code –  Jaime Jun 7 '13 at 16:41

protected by acdcjunior Apr 5 at 12:41

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