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Im looking for a way to replace the following:

public class NonTypeSafe
{
    private List<object> contents = new List<object>();
    public List<object> Contents {get { return contents; }};

    public NonTypeSafe(params object[] arguments)
    {
        foreach(object arg in arguments)
        {
            contents.Add(arg);
        }
    }
}

with something that is typesafe. The aim is to have an object into which i can add numerous objects of varying types. At present, checks have to be made when retrieving the objects to determine whether or not they are of the correct type / in the correct order.

At present i have the following:

public class TypeSafe<T1>
  {
    protected List<object> ArgList = new List<object>();

    private readonly T1 arg1;

    public TypeSafe(T1 arg1)
    {
      ArgList.Add(arg1);
      this.arg1 = arg1;
    }

    public T1 Arg1
    {
      get { return (T1) ArgList[ArgList.IndexOf(arg1)]; }
    }
  }



  public class TypeSafe<T1, T2> : TypeSafe<T1>
  {

    private readonly T2 arg2;

    public TypeSafe(T1 arg1, T2 arg2) : base(arg1)
    {
      ArgList.Add(arg2);
      this.arg2 = arg2;
    }

    public T2 Arg2
    {
      get { return (T2) ArgList[ArgList.IndexOf(arg2)]; }
    }
  }

And so on, adding new classes up to largest number parameters i would reasonably expect. Is there a better way to achieve this?

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Complex Ids, man? :) –  Michael Sagalovich Sep 2 '11 at 13:12
    
ArgList appears to be redundant, given the same information is available in the arg1 and arg2 fields (and doesn't require a cast on retrieval). –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 2 '11 at 13:13
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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Are you re-inventing System.Tuple?

A tuple is a data structure that has a specific number and sequence of elements. An example of a tuple is a data structure with three elements (known as a 3-tuple or triple) that is used to store an identifier such as a person's name in the first element, a year in the second element, and the person's income for that year in the third element.

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Wow, thanks! Never knew of that type. Had written the same several times. :) –  Michael Sagalovich Sep 2 '11 at 13:19
    
it would appear so.... damn. Thanks for the help. –  richzilla Sep 2 '11 at 13:20
1  
@Michael - it was new in .NET 4, so if you were writing it before that was released, there wasn't anything better to do. I've had to backport it to projects not ready to move to .NET 4 a few times. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Sep 2 '11 at 13:24
    
@Damien I wrote it in .NET 4, shame on me :) –  Michael Sagalovich Sep 2 '11 at 13:37
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No, there is no better way in general, because you can't add multiple types into a generic list, if they don't derive from a common base class or implement the same interface.
However, your classes can be written a bit simpler, because you don't need the array, it doesn't add any value. On the contrary, it adds runtime and code complexity.

public class TypeSafe<T1>
{
    private readonly T1 arg1;

    public TypeSafe(T1 arg1)
    {
        this.arg1 = arg1;
    }

    public T1 Arg1
    {
        get { return arg1; }
    }
}

public class TypeSafe<T1, T2> : TypeSafe<T1>
{
    private readonly T2 arg2;

    public TypeSafe(T1 arg1, T2 arg2) : base(arg1)
    {
        this.arg2 = arg2;
    }

    public T2 Arg2
    {
        get { return arg2; }
    }
}
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The way you do it is quite correct, I think. You can trick it a bit, however, not to have to define a lot of classes. Just if you need TypeSafe<T1, T2, T3>, use TypeSafe<TypeSafe<T1, T2>, T3>. You will lose in readability, though. As you'll have constructions like typeSafe.Arg1.Arg1 in your code. Also, you'll need to override Equals method.

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