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I am creating a service and an app. App can call a method on a service. The method is calling an API and based on API, giving the result. Since the app is targetting android 3.0, I am getting "NetworkOnMainThreadException".

My requirement is such a way that I cannot call the method in background thread from app. Also the method on service should return a boolean based on API call.

is there a way where I can call an network API call on main thread in android honeycomb?

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1  
call it on a separate thread. –  binnyb Sep 2 '11 at 13:08
1  
Exactly - the constraint of not being able to use an additional thread is a false one. If it's a "rule of practice" it's coming from someone unaware that an android process already requires a number of background threads to communicate with the android runtime. –  Chris Stratton Sep 2 '11 at 13:30

3 Answers 3

import android.os.StrictMode;

StrictMode.ThreadPolicy policy = new StrictMode.ThreadPolicy.Builder().permitAll().build();
StrictMode.setThreadPolicy(policy);
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Finally someone who doesn't argue about crap and just gives the answer. . i like your style +1 from me :) –  Prince Champappilly Apr 11 '14 at 11:46
    
the same here no arguing about crap a +1 and even a kiss –  Driss Bounouar Aug 5 '14 at 13:06

I am creating a service and an app.

A service is a part of an "app". I am going to assume that you meant "activity" where you wrote "app".

My requirement is such a way that I cannot call the method in background thread from app.

Then whoever created this "requirement" is an idiot and should be fired. Then, remove this requirement. Always perform network operations on a background thread.

Since the app is targetting android 3.0, I am getting "NetworkOnMainThreadException".

That is because StrictMode is on to warn you about these things by default. While the warning is new, the problem exists on all versions of Android your code is running on.

is there a way where I can call an network API call on main thread in android honeycomb?

This should never be done in production code. Rework your application to do the network I/O on a background thread (e.g., AsyncTask).

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There is such a thing as a Service in the Android framework...android.app.Service, not to mention if he's using AIDLs he could in fact be calling one of the Service's methods. –  Austin Hanson Sep 2 '11 at 13:23
    
@Berdon: " not to mention if he's using AIDLs he could in fact be calling one of the Service's methods" -- eminently possible, which is why I used the word "assume". If my assumption is incorrect, perhaps the OP will clarify. –  CommonsWare Sep 2 '11 at 13:29
    
"A service is a part of an "app"" I am fairly certain he knows that Service exists. You are coming off somewhat childish in your berating of @commonsware. He speaks the truth network stuff should always be in the background. –  FoamyGuy Sep 2 '11 at 13:32
    
No kidding; my berating is in response to his hasty down voting of my post stating exactly that. –  Austin Hanson Sep 2 '11 at 13:33

Just a note: making synchronous calls on the UI thread is horrible programming practice for production code - you should always make asynchronous call in a background thread and never have to force a psuedo-synchronous call in the manner shown below.

In fact, I'm only posting this because I'm miffed that the API throws an exception when I make a network call using the AndroidHttpClient on the UI thread for brief functional testing before complete implementation. Ie. Testing an operation meant for a background thread without adding frivolous code to make it a background thread when you don't yet need it.

final Object lock = new Object();
new Thread(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        synchronized(lock) {
            // Perform call
            // lock.notify();
        }
    }
}).start();
synchronized(lock) {
    try {
        lock.wait();
    }
    catch{}
}
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All this does is get rid of a warning. This code is still broken on all versions of Android, as it will result in slow UI code at best and an ANR dialog at worst, depending on what is done in the background thread. –  CommonsWare Sep 2 '11 at 13:13
    
Did you READ my note? I specifically state you shouldn't do this - not only that, "This code is still broken..." - orly? Works fine for me on all versions of Android. –  Austin Hanson Sep 2 '11 at 13:13
    
Yes, I read your note. Whatever makes you think that "for testing purposes" somehow makes bad code good? If by "for testing purposes" you mean a JUnit test case, all this means is that your test case will be unreliable (though the degree of unreliability will depend on what you're doing in the thread). –  CommonsWare Sep 2 '11 at 13:17
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@Berden - if your complaint is that the "idiot-proofing" of the API is making quick tests unnecessarily difficult, you could edit your answer to more clearly state that. Right now, it's not clear who "this is horrible programming practice" applies to - devs who put lengthy operation on the UI thread, or API designers who limit your ability to do risky things for legitimate (as well as illegitimate) reasons. –  Chris Stratton Sep 2 '11 at 13:28
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I am complaining the Android team feels the need to hold my hand during development ;) –  Austin Hanson Sep 2 '11 at 13:40

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