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From the greasemonkey wiki page, there is an example using jQuery with greasemonkey. The code is listed below and the location of the page is http://wiki.greasespot.net/Third-Party_Libraries#jQuery

// ==UserScript==
// @name          jQuery Example
// @require       http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js
// ==/UserScript==

// Append some text to the element with id someText using the jQuery library.
$("#someText").append(" more text.");

This example script modify the DOM directly. Do I need to surround the code with a jQuery function like this:

// ==UserScript==
// @name          jQuery Example
// @require       http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js
// ==/UserScript==

// Append some text to the element with id someText using the jQuery library.
jQuery(function(){
    $("#someText").append(" more text.");   
})

I ask this question is because my greasemonkey code is not executed every time the page is refreshed. Any ideas on this issue? Thanks.

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Sometimes to access the DOM from Greasemonkey scripts you may need to use unsafeWindow.jQuery –  Some Guy Sep 2 '11 at 19:36
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, there is no point in wrapping your script code in a jQuery() call, nor in using $(document).ready ().

Greasemonkey automatically fires after both the DOMContentLoaded event (same as the jQuery wrapper or ready event), and after GM's version of jQuery is loaded.

Also note that that wiki page is outdated. GM works fine with jQuery 1.6.2 now.

You didn't show the relevant code, nor link to the target page, but the most-likely reasons the "Greasemonkey code is not executed every time the page is refreshed" are:

  1. There is an error in the GM script.

  2. The target content is loaded separately, via AJAX.
    You can use code in this pattern, to get around that:

    //--- This handles both page-load delays, and AJAX changes.
    setInterval (function() { checkForTweetbox (); }, 500);
    
    function checkForTweetbox () {
        var tweetbox = document.querySelector ('div.tweet-box textarea');
        if (tweetbox) {
            if (! tweetbox.weHaveProcessed) {
                tweetbox.weHaveProcessed    = true;
                alert ('New tweet-box found!');
            }
        }
    }
    
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Yousui, surrounding the code in a jquery function is a great idea, because it will run only when the DOM has loaded, so when it tries to change something it can find the element. so yes.

Cheers!

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