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My task is to filter some data from perl script with external utility (the addr2line). The data size is quite large. I need to print a lot of data to stdin of program and read a lot of data back (from stdout of program into my script).

Now I do this with IPC::Open2, but I don't mix reading and writing. Is this legal? Will Open2 buffer any size of data in pipe?

My code:

my $cmd="addr2line -e $prog_name ";
use IPC::Open2;
local (*Reader, *Writer);
my $pid = open2(\*Reader, \*Writer, $cmd);
for(@requests) {  # this array is HUGE, 100s of thousands of entries
    print Writer "$_\n";
}
close Writer;  
for(@requests) {
    $function_name = <Reader>;
    $filesource = <Reader>;
   #... store ..
}
close Reader;
waitpid($pid,0);
share|improve this question
    
Good news. You can mix writing a line and reading of two lines because addr2line does "fgets(stdin)" and "fprintf;fprintf;fflush(stdout);" – osgx Sep 3 '11 at 0:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you will run into buffer capacity constraints the way your program is written. Your input buffer (Reader) will fill up and block execution of your external program.

Mixing reading and writing would help, as you would be emptying the input buffer at about the same rate that the external program is filling it.

Another thing that would help is using files for interprocess communication instead of pipes or sockets (as IPC::Open2 does). Then you would be limited only by the amount of free disk space. You could do it yourself, though Forks::Super uses files for IPC by default.

use Forks::Super 'open2';

...
my ($Reader,$Writer,$pid) = open2(@command);
for (@requests) { print $Writer "$_\n" }
close $Writer;
for (@requests) { ... read ... }
close $Reader;
waitpid $pid,0;
share|improve this answer
    
Is Fork::Super standard or it is CPAN? The program is addr2line from binutils – osgx Sep 2 '11 at 17:21
    
Mixing reading and writing helps, because addr2line is designed to works with pipes. It flushes its output for every input line. And it does fgets in loop to read the input. – osgx Sep 3 '11 at 18:02

Pipes have limited sizes. Your approach will deadlock

  Parent                 Child
  ------                 -----
  ...                    ...
                         Wait for data in Writer
  Put data in Writer
                         Read data from Writer
                         Put data in Reader
                         Wait for data in Writer
  Put data in Writer
                         Read data from Writer
                         Put data in Reader
                           => Blocks cause Reader is full
  Put data in Writer
  Put data in Writer
  ...
  Put data in Writer
  Put data in Writer
    => Blocks cause Writer is full

One possible solution:

use strict;
use warnings;
use threads;
use IPC::Open2 qw( open2 );

my @cmd = ("addr2line", "-e", $prog_name);

local (*Reader, *Writer);
my $pid = open2(\*Reader, \*Writer, @cmd);

my $thread = async {
   for (;;) {
       $function_name = <Reader>;
       last if !defined($function_name);
       $filesource = <Reader>;
       #... store ..
   }

   close Reader;
};

{
   my @requests = ...;

   for(@requests) {  # this array is HUGE, 100s of thousands of entries
      print Writer "$_\n";
   }

   close Writer;
}

$thread->join();
waitpid($pid, 0);

Alternatively, IPC::Run has tools that will make this easy too.

The unixy way would be to use IO::Select, but that's a real pain.

share|improve this answer
    
$thread = async - what minimal perl version is needed to do this? – osgx Sep 2 '11 at 20:20
1  
@osgx, 5.6, I think? You need a threaded build of Perl, though. – ikegami Sep 2 '11 at 20:22
    
Looks right. How can I test if my perl build is threaded or not? – osgx Sep 2 '11 at 20:25
1  
@osgx, perl -v will tell you, e.g. i686-linux-thread-multi – ikegami Sep 2 '11 at 20:56
    
When I try "perl -e 'use threads; $thr = async {print "123";};'" - it says: "(The 'useithreads' configuration option hasn't been used.)" – osgx Sep 3 '11 at 0:01

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