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I do not find a way to sort the values included in the columns of the following matrix of tuples :

Matrix<float * float> =
  matrix [[(1.0, 145.0); (1.0, 45.0); (1.0, 130.0); (1.0, 30.0); (1.0, 130.0)]
          [(2.0, 45.0); (2.0, 45.0); (2.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0)]
          [(3.0, 130.0); (3.0, 30.0); (3.0, 145.0); (3.0, 45.0); (3.0, 130.0)]
          [(4.0, 30.0); (4.0, 30.0); (4.0, 45.0); (4.0, 45.0); (4.0, 30.0)]
          [(5.0, 130.0); (5.0, 30.0); (5.0, 130.0); (5.0, 30.0); (5.0, 145.0)]]

I would like to sort each column depending on the second element of the tuple. For example here the answer would be :

   matrix [[(1.0, 145.0); (1.0, 45.0); (3.0, 145.0); (3.0, 45.0); (5.0, 145.0)]
          [(3.0, 130.0); (2.0, 45.0); (1.0, 130.0); (4.0, 45.0); (1.0, 130.0)]
          [(5.0, 130.0); (3.0, 30.0); (5.0, 130.0); (1.0, 30.0); (3.0, 130.0)]
          [(2.0, 45.0); (4.0, 30.0); (4.0, 45.0); (2.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0)]
          [(4.0, 30.0); (5.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0); (5.0, 30.0); (4.0, 30.0)]]

Thank you in advance !

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1  
What did you try? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Sep 2 '11 at 14:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my experience, when working with arrays (2D and/or matrix) I found that working with arrays internally is often the fastest way to go.

For example, combining Daniel's and Ankur's approaches in a mutable way:

let mutableSortByCol f (m:Matrix<'T>) =
    let columns = [| for c in 0 .. m.NumCols - 1 -> 
                         m.Column c |> Vector.Generic.toArray |]

    for c in 0 .. m.NumCols - 1 do 
        columns.[c] |> Array.sortInPlaceBy f

    Matrix.Generic.init (m.NumRows) (m.NumCols) (fun r c -> columns.[c].[r])

I converted the matrix to an array of columns ('a[][], not 'a[,]), and performed an in-place sort on each column. After that, I filled a new matrix with the sorted result. Note that the original matrix remains unmodified: the columns array is populated with copies of the column vectors (Vector.toArray creates a new array).

This approach is faster because it needs no transposes, sorts columns in place, and needs no conversion to and from intermediate list structures by keeping everything array-oriented. I suspect it could be made even faster if the Matrix module supported conversion to/from 'a[][] as well, although it's perhaps not really suited for matrices.

Also, in case you didn't know: you can make use of F#'s structural comparison of tuples to sort by second element descending, first element ascending:

Example:

> mutableSortByCol (fun (a,b) -> (-b,a)) M;;
val it : Matrix<float * float> =
  matrix [[(1.0, 145.0); (1.0, 45.0); (3.0, 145.0); (3.0, 45.0); (5.0, 145.0)]
          [(3.0, 130.0); (2.0, 45.0); (1.0, 130.0); (4.0, 45.0); (1.0, 130.0)]
          [(5.0, 130.0); (3.0, 30.0); (5.0, 130.0); (1.0, 30.0); (3.0, 130.0)]
          [(2.0, 45.0); (4.0, 30.0); (4.0, 45.0); (2.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0)]
          [(4.0, 30.0); (5.0, 30.0); (2.0, 30.0); (5.0, 30.0); (4.0, 30.0)]]
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You're right it's faster ! Thank you ! –  katter75 Sep 5 '11 at 10:43

Below is such a function:

let sortByCol f (m:Matrix<'T>) = 
    let n = m.Transpose
    [for i = 0 to n.NumRows-1 do 
        yield [for j in n.Row(i) -> j] 
              |> List.sortBy f ]
    |> Matrix.Generic.ofList
    |> Matrix.Generic.transpose

Usage as particular to this question:

matrix |> sortByCol (fun (_,b) -> -b)

UPDATED: To make the sort by col function generic.

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Excellent ! Effectively it seems to be much faster ! thanks a lot –  katter75 Sep 2 '11 at 16:15

I've never used Matrix before so there might be a better way, but this seems to work:

let sortMatrix (m:Matrix<_>) =
  seq {
    for c in 0 .. (m.NumCols - 1) do
      let arr = [| for r in 0 .. (m.NumRows - 1) -> m.[r, c] |]
      arr |> Array.sortInPlaceBy (fun (_, b) -> -b : float) //(snd >> (~-))
      yield arr
  }
  |> Matrix.Generic.ofSeq 
  |> Matrix.Generic.transpose
share|improve this answer
    
My experience is that computation expressions (seq {...}) are slow so I would not recommend it for intensive computations. But I did not test the speed for this case so I may be wrong. –  Oldrich Svec Sep 2 '11 at 15:28
1  
I think that may be an oversimplification. Often other parts of the computation dwarf seq in terms of overhead. I've seen huge speed increases switching to sequences from list or array-based approaches. It really depends on what you're doing. For this case, I can't say if it's efficient. I cobbled it together quickly and due to my inexperience with Matrix don't have another method to compare it with. –  Daniel Sep 2 '11 at 15:37
    
Thank you, it works perfectly ! I don't know if there are other approaches, if one day I find another one I will let you know ! Thanks a lot –  katter75 Sep 2 '11 at 16:08
    
@katter75: Thanks. I'd be glad to know if there's a better way. –  Daniel Sep 2 '11 at 16:43
    
@Daniel : Just to let you know that the approach proposed by cfern here is faster ... good to know ;) –  katter75 Sep 5 '11 at 12:38

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