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I have a Python library design that I'm trying to clean up, but I noticed that one piece isn't auto-completing in Eclipse/PyDev. I'm familiar enough for this not to be a problem for me, but its a library that others will end up using and auto-complete that doesn't work for a feature chunk won't do.

I'll just explain quickly what its trying to do, I re-created the design below. It all works, but auto-complete isn't useful. Maybe someone can just set me straight.

In module test_module2.py

import Main from test_module.py

from test_module import Main

class Second(object):
    _main = Main
    def set_main_variable(self, var):
        self._main.variable = var

In module test_module.py

import sys

class Main(object):
    variable = 0
    second = None
    def __init__(self):
        for x in sys.modules.keys():
            if x.endswith("test_module2"):
                y = sys.modules[x]
            self.second = y.Second()
                self.second._main = self

    def print_variable(self):
        print self.variable

In application test.py

import test_module
import test_module2

if __name__ == "__main__":
    m = test_module.Main()
    m.second.set_main_variable(10)
    m.print_variable() # prints 10

With this, if the test_module2.py module is imported, you can access it via a separate namespace member variable Main.second. Keeps things separate, and if the module isn't available, then you don't have access to Second's features.

In test_module2.py, Main is imported (you can't use Second without Main anyways) and _main is default to Main. This allows auto-complete in Second when you're working on the parent _main reference that's setup when Main is constructed and Second was imported. (this is good)

In Main, Second is optional and is never directly calls from Main methods. So auto-complete isn't necessary. (this is fine)

In __main__, auto-complete naturally works for Main member variables and methods, but doesn't work with m.second. I can't default m.second to anything because I'd end up having to import test_module2.py from test_module.py. It's optional and is defined by __main__'s import of test_module2.py. e.g. if __main__ imports test_module2.py, then Second is automatically available to the application.

Anyone have a better way to have an optionally imported module/class construct to a member variable, that will work with IDE auto-completion?

Thanks in advance for any ideas.

I'm going to come to the conclusion that auto-completion with PyDev will only see a variable set to a class's members if the parent class inherits from it, or defaults the variable to the class itself. For example:

class Main(object):
    second = Second

Then in __main__ you can auto-complete: main.second...

That or Main has to inherit from Second.

Ok, I need to go back and complain that this library design isn't going to work with IDE auto-completion. See if I can use an wrapper class to inherit if the import test_module2 is present and clean things up.

My solution: Here's what I came up with:

In module test_module2.py

import test_module
class Second(object):
    _variable = 0 # overrided by Main's _variable
    def set_main_variable(self, var):
        self._variable = var

class Main(test_module.Main, Second):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Main, self).__init__()

In module test_module.py

class Main(object):
    _variable = 0
    second = None
    def __init__(self):
        super(Main, self).__init__()

    def print_variable(self):
        print self._variable

Now! In test.py if you import test_module or test_module2 (not both), you can construct Main with or without Second's added functionality. Second will have access to everything in Main, and because Main is inheriting Second, auto-complete works.

In application test.py

#import test_module
import test_module2

if __name__ == "__main__":
    m = test_module.Main()
    m.set_main_variable(10)
    m.print_variable() # prints 10

I don't know if I can easily move Second's methods into a sub-namespace, like Main.second.set_variable(). I would have to explicitly set a Main reference within Second after Main constructs it as a variable, (in Main init, self.second = Second()) and not have Second inherited by Main. Then you could call m.second.set_main_variable(10), and keep all Second methods accesible from Main under the .second namespace.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First, Simple is better than complex -- your design appears to be complicated for no good reason. Maybe you should provide some details about your actual library.

Second, with Python as a dynamically typed language, it's just natural that there are cases when your IDE fails to auto-complete because your IDE has a static perspective. And you definitely shouldn't programm to suite the capabilites of your IDE.

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Completely agree that I shouldn't be too focused on IDE compatibility, but it would make the library use much easier for the user. Not all of our users will be super productive programmers (researchers, etc...) so I've been asked to make sure it's IDE friendly. The Main class is some base functionality. The Second class is some "add-on" functionality that appends its features to Main. We have to distribute these modules separate due to licensing reasons. (not protecting IP so much as legal reasons I've been told) –  garlicman Sep 2 '11 at 16:06
    
Okay, I got your use case. Still, I do not see a way how PyDev could auto-complete a module imported by it's name at runtime. While PyDev could inspect sys.modules to guess what type y is of, it probably won't find your referenced module in its sys.modules because its runtime environment differs from the runtime environment of your library/application. –  Oben Sonne Sep 2 '11 at 16:23
    
But, if you know the name of the module to import, you could import it regularly (ie. import test_package2) within Main.__init__(). In that case I'd guess PyDev could auto-complete. –  Oben Sonne Sep 2 '11 at 16:24
    
Ya that doesn't do the trick either. "from test import Second" in Main __init__() won't auto-complete from __main__. The problem is "Main.second = None" is all the IDE sees. If you swap it out later, no matter how, the IDE won't interpret it that deep. The only way I see auto-complete working is if Second is inherited, or defaulted to the class, then IDE will notice the type its supposed to be. –  garlicman Sep 2 '11 at 16:43

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