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i have function with return type as (NSArray/NSData/NSString/NSDictionary and so on). i can return and use as well ,but my problem arise @ release the object. Please guide me which one is best way to manage memory for returned object.if anything is wrong please ignore and give your best solution

i have refereed apple Memory management guide

A)

-(NSData *)somefunction2
{  
   NSData *data=[[[NSData alloc]init]autorelease];  
    // fill stuff for nsdata
   return data;
}

-(void)somefunction
{    
NSData *data=[self somefunction2];    
// use data    
}

but most of the blogs advice to avoid autorelease so i was using following type

B)

-(NSData *)somefunction2
{  
   NSData *data=[[NSData alloc]init];  
    // fill stuff for nsdata
   return data;
}

-(void)somefunction
{

NSData *data=[[self somefunction2] retain];

// use data

[data release];

}

C)

-(NSData *)somefunction2
{  
   NSData *data=[[[NSData alloc]init]autorelease];  
    // fill stuff for nsdata
   return data;
}

-(void)somefunction
{

NSData *data=[[self somefunction2] retain];

// use data

[data release];

}

Edit: One more thing. if i try to pass Same allocted object to Some function call Argument or custom Delegate object ,Where i have to Release ????Whether below the function call or get retain in function def and then release.

NSData *data=[[NSData alloc]init];

[self somfunctioncall:data];

or

NSData *data=[[NSData alloc]init];

[delegate mydelegatefunction:data];


-(void)somfunctioncall:(NSdata *)data
{
NSData *newdata =[data retain];
//data use
[data release];}

Thanks in advance

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1  
N.B. the prefix "get" is used only for methods that return values or objects indirectly. –  albertamg Sep 2 '11 at 15:45
    
thanks albertamg –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 3 '11 at 4:17
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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The best practice is that if the method contains either alloc, init, new or retain, the method returns a retained object, and if it doesn't it is returning an autoreleased object. I would suggest this:

-(NSString *)newData
{  
   NSData *data=[[NSData alloc]init];  
    // fill stuff for nsdata
   return data;
}

So that later you can just do this:

-(void)somefunction
{

NSData *data=[self newData];

// use data

[data release];

}
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:Thanks for your reply . how below line data NSData *data=[self getData]; will get ownership??. i thought we need to retain for ownership. –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 2 '11 at 15:19
    
@Asta ni enohpi, you do need to retain it for ownership, however the method is doing that for you –  Oscar Gomez Sep 2 '11 at 15:24
    
Memory management rules state that methods that return retained objects begin with “alloc”, “new”, “copy”, or “mutableCopy”, not that they contain them. Also, method names are camel case, which means "copyRightNotice" returns a retained object while "copyrightNotice" does not (the later begins with the word "copyright" while the former begins with the word "copy"). –  albertamg Sep 2 '11 at 15:38
    
@OScar .I understand now, what that function will do while this type of cases.one more doubt .Plz see my edited Question –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 3 '11 at 4:07
1  
NO You're breaking the guidelines that you're talking about. You are supposed to return autoreleased objects from methods. In this case you are returning an owned object from a method that doesn't start with NARC, and in someFunction you are releasing an object that you have not taken ownership of. It works because you know that you are returning an object that needs to be released - but you are explicitly breaking the guidelines. –  Abizern Sep 3 '11 at 4:10
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iOS memory management can be befuddling at times! First I suggest you always run the analyzer in XCode which will point out possible memory leaks, this can be extremely helpful!

Since data is a local variable, I believe that it is by default an autorelease in both functions.

I see that Oscar has just given you some improved code, that is the one I would vote for as well.

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thanks Alan Moore.. if i Doesn't use Autorelease ,Analyser show some leaks. –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 2 '11 at 15:22
    
In that case I would go ahead and do a [data release]. Personally I don't use autorelease at all, I'm agreeing with the other blogs you've read on that. –  Alan Moore Sep 2 '11 at 15:48
    
thanks Alan Moore.+1 for ur analyzer tool tips –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 3 '11 at 4:03
    
You seriously think Oscar's code is improved? –  Abizern Sep 3 '11 at 4:18
    
Thanks for the +1 Asta! Abizem -- I like Oscar's better than A, B, or C. Personally, prefer to let XCode do the memory management whenever possible and leave out the explicit retains and autoreleases. Then I run the analyzer to check for anything I may have missed. Finally I run a good long session with the Leak Detector tool on a device (the simulator picks up weird leaks) just in case there is anything else that I've overlooked. I find that gets 99.99% of the leaks (the assumption being you can never get everything fixed!). –  Alan Moore Sep 3 '11 at 13:30
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I personally prefer the third(C) way. But, there is no need to retain and release data in someFunction.

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Shouldn't you retain it if you are going to use it?, is there the possibility that the pool will get drained before you use it in someFunction? –  Oscar Gomez Sep 2 '11 at 15:29
1  
No need to retain it unless he has to access the object outside the method. And, as for as I know, there is no chance that autorelease pool gets drained before that method's execution is over. –  EmptyStack Sep 2 '11 at 15:43
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A is fine. You return create an object and return an autoreleased object. Another function uses this object, and since it doesn't need to hold on to it past the method, it doesn't need to retain or release it.

There is nothing wrong with using autorelease in the correct place. Methods that do not have new, alloc, in the name, return autoreleased objects, so it is okay to return an autoreleased object in getData (which is badly named, but let's leave that for now).

autorelease is discouraged in other places because it increases the memory high-water mark. And it is used incorrectly when it is used lazily - by programmers who aren't sure when it is safe to release on owned object so they just autorelease them instead.

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Thanks for clear answer and locate my errors.Sorry to name as getdata and now i have edited the name.am going to use above concept frequently .so whether autorelease will affect my code performance. plz guide me . seriously i read lot of blogs . all ppl using different different style . –  Asta ni enohpi Sep 3 '11 at 4:29
    
Your last sentence suddenly makes clear to me why so many people suggest avoiding autorelease. Ew. But thanks. :) –  Steven Fisher Sep 15 '11 at 4:06
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"A" is correct. The advice to avoid autorelease in iOS is a performance enhancement about managing an object's lifetime within a single method, not across methods.

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Don't avoid autorelease.

If a blog is telling you to avoid autorelease they are giving you bad advice. It's premature performance optimization. Using autorelease results in simpler code and almost never hurts performance. And the few times it does hurt performance, it's easily fixed.

"A" is correct.

"B" is incorrect, in that it does not follow Objective-C naming conventions. That matters. A lot. As you learn Objective-C conventions, you'll find it difficult to integrate this code. The compiler will probably give you bad warnings. And the next version of llvm will have automatic reference counting, which means you can rely on the compiler to write the memory management code for your Objective-C objects. It does that based on conventions, so it'll fail.

"C" is also correct, but unnecessarily complicated in this case. If there was a chance of drain of the autorelease pool while you were working with the data, this would be the right code.

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Also - don't depend on ARC to make all memory management issues go away. It only works on Objective-C objects, so you still need to manage objects returned from C APIs (CoreGraphics, CoreFoundation, GCD, etc) yourself. –  Abizern Sep 3 '11 at 4:31
    
Good point. Tweaked my answer a bit for it. I don't explain the C APIs, but now I properly limit ARC to Objective-C objects. –  Steven Fisher Sep 3 '11 at 19:52
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