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Briefly dismiss the fact that normal function overloading will serve this example better. It is meant only as a way to learn about template programming. Having said that, you are welcome to comment on the benefits/differences you'll get from using function overload, compared to function template specialization (although that might deserve a question of its own).


Consider the following example:

template <typename T>
inline void ToString(T value, char* target, size_t max_size );

template <>
inline void ToString<float>(float value, char* target, size_t max_size)
{
   snprintf( target , max_size , "%f" , value);
}

template <>
inline void ToString<double>(double value, char* target, size_t max_size)
{
    snprintf( target , max_size , "%f" , value);
}

Is there a way to write only one of these specializations that match both float and double types?

Basically I envision writing a template specialization for a template type that will match both float and double (as sort of 'float or double' type matcher) but I'm not sure whether that is possible at all with C++. That said, I've seen unexpected template magic happen in front of my eyes before, so I think it's a good question to ask here.

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1  
If you want something that matches more than one concrete type, then that's partial specialization, which isn't allowed for functions. –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '11 at 15:52
    
hi @Kerrek, my understanding of partial specialization is that is about specializing a subset of the template parameters. I only have one template parameter in here. I don't follow how partial specialization is relevant here –  lurscher Sep 2 '11 at 15:54
2  
Partial specialization means that the result is still a template, rather than a type. Consider for example template <typename> struct X; template <typename T> struct X<T*>; That's partial. –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '11 at 15:57
    
@Kerrek, how would you do it using a function object template? –  lurscher Sep 2 '11 at 16:06
    
Wrap the thing into a class, and specialize to heart's content. –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '11 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a standard solution idiom:

#include <type_traits>
#include <cstdio>


// Helper class

template <typename T>
struct Printer
{
  static typename std::enable_if<std::is_floating_point<T>::value, int>::type
  print(T x, char * out, std::size_t n)
  {
    return std::snprintf(out, n, "%f", x);
  }
};

// Convenience function wrapper

template <typename T> int print(T x, char * out, std::size_t n)
{
  return Printer<T>::print(x, out, n);
}

void f()
{
  char a[10];

  Printer<double>::print(1.2, a, 10);  // use helper class
  print(1.4f, a, 10);                  // wrapper deduces type for you
}

You'll get a compile-time error if you call either construction with a non-floating type. Beware though that this might erroneously work for long doubles, which require the %Lf format specifier; and also recall that floats get promoted to doubles when passed through variadic function arguments.

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ah didn't knew about std::type_traits, thanks! –  lurscher Sep 2 '11 at 16:15

You can add an additional parameter to indicate categories of classes using type_traits. For example,

#include <type_traits>
template <typename T, bool = std::is_floating_point<T> >
inline void ToString(T value, char* target, size_t max_size );

// partially specialize the template function
template <typename T, true>
inline void ToString<T>(T value, char* target, size_t max_size)
{
    snprintf( target , max_size , "%f" , value);
}

(Code was written in the browser and not tested.)

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4  
No, you cannot partially specialize functions. –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '11 at 16:00
    
Ah, good point. Would have to wrap it in a class, like your solution. –  Richard Sep 2 '11 at 16:51

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