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i have a program in which i have implemented main function as below and finally i getting a unexpected value of i.

 int main()
    {
        int fun (int);
        int i=3;
        fun(i=fun(fun(i)));
        printf("%d",i);
        return 0;
    }

and my function implementation is

int fun(int i)
{
    i++;
    return(i);

}

my output is:

5

what i expected was:

6
share|improve this question
7  
Why would you expect it to be 6? – user168715 Sep 2 '11 at 15:55
    
@awoodland: Why did you remove the C++ tag? – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 2 '11 at 16:00
    
@david - There's nothing C++ about it and it's using printf which is decidedly C – Flexo Sep 2 '11 at 16:02
    
@awoodland: While it is not idimatic C++, that code with the appropriate includes will compile in any C++ compiler. I think it is better to ask the person (@teacher in this case) to decide on what is the actual language of the question, noting that if it is C++ he will probably get also comments on how to make it more idiomatic – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 2 '11 at 16:24
    
@David - agreed. My concern was that the answers would be notably different depending on which of C or C++ this was and I (inappropriately) took an educated guess on the issue. – Flexo Sep 2 '11 at 16:26
i = fun(i=fun(fun(i)));

This would give you 6

fun(i=fun(fun(i)));

This gives 5 because the last call does not assign the value to i.

Also as mentioned by Tom below i is being passed by value not reference, if you did pass by reference then it would be 6 if you did fun(fun(fun(&i)));(depending on what parameter type the function takes/returns).

share|improve this answer
    
and because i is being passed by value. – Tom Sep 2 '11 at 15:58

You are passing the argument by value, and returning that value. The variable i is only modified during initialization (set to 3) and in the call to the outer fun where it takes the value 5 returned from fun(fun(3))

EDIT C++ only (before @awoodland removed that tag from the question):

If you want to modify the external variable in the function you can do so by using references:

int& fun( int & x ) {
  return ++x;
}
int main() {
   int i = 3;
   fun( fun( fun( i ) ) );
// fun( i = fun( fun( i ) ) ); // alternatively
}
share|improve this answer
    
Fair point about the c++ tag, but doesn't that make the C tag inappropriate then? – Flexo Sep 2 '11 at 16:04
    
@awoodland: The issue is that I don't know which of the two languages is the one that the teacher is interested in, and the decision of removing one or the other is arbitrary. The answer, on the other hand, is explicitly tackling one language C++, but that does not mean that teacher is interested in C++, only that if it is C++, this would be another alternative. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 2 '11 at 16:26
i = 3;

fun(i=fun(fun(i)));
        +
        |
        V
fun(i=fun(fun(3)));
        +
        |
        V
fun(i=fun(4));       /* fun (3) returns 4 */
        +
        |
        V
   fun(i=5);         /* fun (4) returns 5 and it is stored in i */
        +
        |
        V
    fun(5);         /* fun (5) returns 6, but it is NOWHERE stored, i is still 5 */

print i results in 5 .
share|improve this answer

My guess is that your expectation comes from the i++ being convention for i = i + 1 and while that is true your issue here is scope. When you call a function in C like this add:

int add( int a, int b ) {
     a = a + b;
     return a;
}

you are passing by value. Which is to say that C is generating a duplicate of the values, thus you have a difference scope and thus things that happen inside of add only affect the things inside of add.

The other method you can pass data around in C is by reference like this

int * add( int * a, int b ) {
   (*a) = (*a) + b;
   return a;
}

that function will mutate the memory pointed to by a* and thus is "violating" it's scope. Using pass by reference you could have your function act in the manner you expected.

share|improve this answer

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