Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am parsing XML returned from a website but sadly it is slightly malformed. I am getting XML like:

<tag attrib="Buy two for &pound;1" />

Which, I am informed, is invalid because &pound; is an HTML character, not an XML character and definitely cannot appear in an attribute.

What can I do to fix this, assuming I cannot tell the website to obey the rules? I am considering using a FilterInputStream to filter the arriving data before it gets to the SAX parser but this seems over the top.

share|improve this question
    
In the end I failed to do this with the parser. My solution was to write a FilterInputStream that converted all &xxxx; references into their &#nnnn; form. Thanks all for the assistance. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 28 '11 at 11:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the end I failed to do this with the parser. My solution was to write a FilterInputStream that converted all &xxxx; references into their &#nnnn; form.

/* Cleans up often very bad xml. 
 * 
 * 1. Strips leading white space.
 * 2. Recodes &pound; etc to &#...;.
 * 3. Recodes lone & as &amp.
 * 
 */
public class XMLInputStream extends FilterInputStream {

  private static final int MIN_LENGTH = 2;
  // Everything we've read.
  StringBuilder red = new StringBuilder();
  // Data I have pushed back.
  StringBuilder pushBack = new StringBuilder();
  // How much we've given them.
  int given = 0;
  // How much we've read.
  int pulled = 0;

  public XMLInputStream(InputStream in) {
    super(in);
  }

  public int length() {
    // NB: This is a Troll length (i.e. it goes 1, 2, many) so 2 actually means "at least 2"

    try {
      StringBuilder s = read(MIN_LENGTH);
      pushBack.append(s);
      return s.length();
    } catch (IOException ex) {
      log.warning("Oops ", ex);
    }
    return 0;
  }

  private StringBuilder read(int n) throws IOException {
    // Input stream finished?
    boolean eof = false;
    // Read that many.
    StringBuilder s = new StringBuilder(n);
    while (s.length() < n && !eof) {
      // Always get from the pushBack buffer.
      if (pushBack.length() == 0) {
        // Read something from the stream into pushBack.
        eof = readIntoPushBack();
      }

      // Pushback only contains deliverable codes.
      if (pushBack.length() > 0) {
        // Grab one character
        s.append(pushBack.charAt(0));
        // Remove it from pushBack
        pushBack.deleteCharAt(0);
      }

    }
    return s;
  }

  // Returns true at eof.
  // Might not actually push back anything but usually will.
  private boolean readIntoPushBack() throws IOException {
    // File finished?
    boolean eof = false;
    // Next char.
    int ch = in.read();
    if (ch >= 0) {
      // Discard whitespace at start?
      if (!(pulled == 0 && isWhiteSpace(ch))) {
        // Good code.
        pulled += 1;
        // Parse out the &stuff;
        if (ch == '&') {
          // Process the &
          readAmpersand();
        } else {
          // Not an '&', just append.
          pushBack.append((char) ch);
        }
      }
    } else {
      // Hit end of file.
      eof = true;
    }
    return eof;
  }

  // Deal with an ampersand in the stream.
  private void readAmpersand() throws IOException {
    // Read the whole word, up to and including the ;
    StringBuilder reference = new StringBuilder();
    int ch;
    // Should end in a ';'
    for (ch = in.read(); isAlphaNumeric(ch); ch = in.read()) {
      reference.append((char) ch);
    }
    // Did we tidily finish?
    if (ch == ';') {
      // Yes! Translate it into a &#nnn; code.
      String code = hash(reference);
      if (code != null) {
        // Keep it.
        pushBack.append(code);
      } else {
        throw new IOException("Invalid/Unknown reference '&" + reference + ";'");
      }
    } else {
      // Did not terminate properly! 
      // Perhaps an & on its own or a malformed reference.
      // Either way, escape the &
      pushBack.append("&amp;").append(reference).append((char) ch);
    }
  }

  private void given(CharSequence s, int wanted, int got) {
    // Keep track of what we've given them.
    red.append(s);
    given += got;
    log.finer("Given: [" + wanted + "," + got + "]-" + s);
  }

  @Override
  public int read() throws IOException {
    StringBuilder s = read(1);
    given(s, 1, 1);
    return s.length() > 0 ? s.charAt(0) : -1;
  }

  @Override
  public int read(byte[] data, int offset, int length) throws IOException {
    int n = 0;
    StringBuilder s = read(length);
    for (int i = 0; i < Math.min(length, s.length()); i++) {
      data[offset + i] = (byte) s.charAt(i);
      n += 1;
    }
    given(s, length, n);
    return n > 0 ? n : -1;
  }

  @Override
  public String toString() {
    String s = red.toString();
    String h = "";
    // Hex dump the small ones.
    if (s.length() < 8) {
      // Separator just inserts the string between each.
      Separator sep = new Separator(" ");
      for (int i = 0; i < s.length(); i++) {
        h += sep.sep() + Integer.toHexString(s.charAt(i));
      }
    }
    return "[" + given + "]-\"" + s + "\"" + (h.length() > 0 ? " (" + h + ")" : "");
  }

  private boolean isWhiteSpace(int ch) {
    switch (ch) {
      case ' ':
      case '\r':
      case '\n':
      case '\t':
        return true;
    }
    return false;
  }

  private boolean isAlphaNumeric(int ch) {
    return ('a' <= ch && ch <= 'z') 
        || ('A' <= ch && ch <= 'Z') 
        || ('0' <= ch && ch <= '9');
  }

  // Should be elsewhere.
  static String hash(CharSequence s) {
    Integer code = specials.get(s.toString());
    if (code != null) {
      return "&#" + code + ";";
    }
    return null;
  }

}

Thanks all for the assistance.

share|improve this answer
    
Try Streamflyer the next time. This is a tool I made to modify character streams. With Streamflyer you would define a regular expression that matches the faulty entities so that they are replaced with their correct representation. –  rwitzel Jun 29 '12 at 14:33
    
Could you please provide the required packages/imports? Where do XML.hash and Separator come from? –  Hans Stricker Jun 5 '13 at 8:41
    
@HansStricker - I've copied hash into the code. It really does not belong there. Separator just separates things. Replace it with Apache Stringutils.join or something similar - it is only cosmetics. –  OldCurmudgeon Jun 5 '13 at 13:16

One option to resolve your issue is, as Jim Garrison suggested, providing custom EntityResolver. However, it will fix only the concrete issue you described. If your XML will be malformed by e.g. not closed tags, EntityResolver would not fix it. In such case I'd recommend to use one of available HTML "purifiers" in order to fix HTML syntax into XML-valid form. In my opinion the best available is this one: http://nekohtml.sourceforge.net/

share|improve this answer
    
I am confident that the xml is syntactically correct other than the presence of 'bad' characters. Have you any references to a working example? I can only find usages of EntityResolver resolving urls etc. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 5 '11 at 11:34

You could handle this by providing a custom org.xml.sax.EntityResolver to convert the entity &pound; to a valid character.

EDIT: I did some further research and found that entity references (such as &pound;) are handled directly as events. Configure your parser (through XMLInputFactory) with the feature javax.xml.stream.isReplacingEntityReferences set to FALSE, which prevents it from trying to resolve the entity references. Then, when you parse the input you will get input events for each entity reference as a call to your handler's startEntity(String name) method. The handler must implement org.xml.sax.ext.DefaultHandler2.

share|improve this answer
    
I can only find usages of EntityResolver resolving urls etc. How can one be used to resolve "&pound;"? –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 5 '11 at 11:37
    
I've updated my answer with further information. –  Jim Garrison Sep 5 '11 at 16:48
    
Thanks for the edit Jim. My research suggests XMLInputFactory is a feature of the StAX parser. I am currently using the normal SAX parser and cannot at this time upgrade to Java-6. Do I need to get a StAX parser to make this happen or is there a way of doing this off-the-shelf. –  OldCurmudgeon Sep 14 '11 at 11:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.