Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have written a program in C# that runs the Pythagorean Theorem. I would love some help on allowing the program to accept decimal points from the user input. This is what I have.

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;

    namespace Project_2
{
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int sideA = 0;
        int sideB = 0;
        double sideC = 0;
        Console.Write("Enter a integer for Side A ");
        sideA = Convert.ToInt16(Console.ReadLine());
        Console.Write("Enter a integer for Side B ");
        sideB = Convert.ToInt16(Console.ReadLine());
        sideC = Math.Pow((sideA * sideA + sideB * sideB), .5);
        Console.Write("Side C has this length...");
        Console.WriteLine(sideC);
        Console.ReadLine();

    }
}
} 

I have been trying to research this by using the Math.Abs and so on only to receive build errors. Help in the write path would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
3  
Use Decimal.Parse() on the user input –  DustinDavis Sep 2 '11 at 16:27
    
If I use that then the Math.Pow function stops working because it can't convert a double to a decimal. –  Thomas Sep 2 '11 at 16:30
add comment

3 Answers

I would recommend using Decimal.TryParse. This pattern is very safe since it traps the exceptions and returns a boolean to determine the success of the parse operation.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.decimal.tryparse.aspx

share|improve this answer
1  
A nitpick: Generally speaking, the various TryParse patterns don't "trap" exceptions; they avoid them altogether. –  LukeH Sep 2 '11 at 16:31
    
Fair enough, but they do not expose any exception to the user. That is why this is a good pattern. I use this pattern in custom code as well. –  hivie7510 Sep 5 '11 at 21:46
add comment

Math.Pow doesnt take in decimal. There is already another question on SO about Math.Pow and decimal. Use double.

static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            double sideA = 0;
            double sideB = 0; 
            double sideC = 0; 
            Console.Write("Enter a integer for Side A ");
            sideA = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine()); 
            Console.Write("Enter a integer for Side B ");
            sideB = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine()); 
            sideC = Math.Pow((sideA * sideA + sideB * sideB), .5); 
            Console.Write("Side C has this length..."); 
            Console.WriteLine(sideC); 
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
share|improve this answer
    
That was the trick. My error was with the assignments of the sides. Thank you very much for your help! –  Thomas Sep 2 '11 at 16:35
add comment
static decimal RequestDecimal(string message)
{
    decimal result;
    do 
    {
         Console.WriteLine(message);
    }
    while (!decimal.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out result));
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.