Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want 2, 4, 6 to display... instead I think address numbers are displaying?

What do I need to do to correct and why? Thanks

(purpose... to demonstrate ability to change array space and still keep the base of the array)

    int *line;

    line = new int;
    line[0] = 2;
    line = new int;
    line[1] = 4;
    line = new int;
    line[2] = 6;
    line = new int;
    printf("%d  %d  %d", line[0], line[1], line[2]);
share|improve this question
4  
Well you're sure clobbering that heap good.. Not to mention the FOUR memory leaks trying to display THREE numbers... –  Blindy Sep 2 '11 at 16:45
    
    
If you want to "change the array space and keep the base" (I suppose you mean the "initial segment"?), you won't get around copying the old array into a newly allocated area. By the way, there's a class called std::vector<int> which does precisely that for you ;-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 2 '11 at 16:55
2  
Let me guess, you come from a background in java or c#? –  Rob K Sep 2 '11 at 17:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try this instead:

int *line;

line = new int[3];
line[0] = 2;
line[1] = 4;
line[2] = 6;
printf("%d  %d  %d", line[0], line[1], line[2]);
delete[] line;

Points to notice:

line = new int[3]; // here you are supposed to specify the size of your new array
...
delete[] line; // whenever you use new sometype[somevalue]; 
               // you must call delete[] later on to free the allocated resources.

Also take a look at this question in SO:

delete vs delete[] operators in C++

share|improve this answer

You're overwriting the pointer line at each new int. And you're leaking the memory from the one before it.

Also, since you're only allocating one int, only line[0] is defined. Accessing line[1] and line[2] is undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining the reason –  EAGER_STUDENT Sep 2 '11 at 16:50

You declare an int* and allocate an int with new. At this point line contains an address that points to the int.

Accessing line[1] and line[2] are crashes waiting to happen because those locations contain garbage. You never allocated memory at those places.

share|improve this answer

Repeat after me: "This is not Java. I will not use new without good reason."

For an array of three ints, you just want something like:

int line[] = {2, 4, 6};

To print them out, you normally want to use std::cout instead of printf:

std::cout << line[0] << " " << line[1] << " " << line[2];

Note, in particular, that there's no reason to use new for this task at all.

share|improve this answer

The line line = new int replaces the thing line points to with a newly allocated piece of the stack of size int.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.