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I have the following piece of code that I execute around 2 million times in my application to parse that many records. This part seems to be the bottleneck and I was wondering if anyone could help me by suggesting some nifty tricks that could make these simple string manipulations faster.

try:
    data = []
    start = 0
    end = 0
    for info in self.Columns():
        end = start + (info.columnLength)
        slice = line[start:end]
        if slice == '' or len(slice) != info.columnLength:
            raise 'Wrong Input'
        if info.hasSignage:
            if(slice[0:1].strip() != '+' and slice[0:1].strip() != '-'):
                raise 'Wrong Input'
        if not info.skipColumn:
            data.append(slice)
        start = end 
    parsedLine = data
except:
    parsedLine = False
share|improve this question
1  
codereview.stackexchange.com is probably better suited for questions like this. –  Wooble Sep 2 '11 at 18:21
3  
Perhaps you could post a full, runnable performance test for people to run against. –  Mike Graham Sep 2 '11 at 18:21
3  
String exceptions have been deprecated for many, many years--always raise an Exception subclass instead. The only reason they appear to work anymore is that they're wrong and therefore raise an error. –  Mike Graham Sep 2 '11 at 18:22
6  
Bare except: is almost always wrong can can lead to frustrating, untrackable bugs. If all you wanted to catch was raise "Wrong Input" then what you would do is define class InvalidInputError(Exception): pass and then except InvalidInputError:. –  Mike Graham Sep 2 '11 at 18:24
3  
@Mike Graham: even better than a class body of pass is a docstring. –  IfLoop Sep 2 '11 at 19:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: I'm changing this answer a bit. I'll leave the original answer below.

In my other answer I commented that the best thing would be to find a built-in Python module that would do the unpacking. I couldn't think of one, but perhaps I should have Google searched for one. @John Machin provided an answer that showed how to do it: use the Python struct module. Since that is written in C, it should be faster than my pure Python solution. (I haven't actually measured anything so it is a guess.)

I do agree that the logic in the original code is "un-Pythonic". Returning a sentinel value isn't best; it's better to either return a valid value or raise an exception. The other way to do it is to return a list of valid values, plus another list of invalid values. Since @John Machin offered code to yield up valid values, I thought I'd write a version here that returns two lists.

NOTE: Perhaps the best possible answer would be to take @John Machin's answer and modify it to save the invalid values to a file for possible later review. His answer yields up answers one at a time, so there is no need to build a large list of parsed records; and saving the bad lines to disk means there is no need to build a possibly-large list of bad lines.

import struct

def parse_records(self):
    """
    returns a tuple: (good, bad)
    good is a list of valid records (as tuples)
    bad is a list of tuples: (line_num, line, err)
    """

    cols = self.Columns()
    unpack_fmt = ""
    sign_checks = []
    start = 0
    for colx, info in enumerate(cols, 1):
        clen = info.columnLength
        if clen < 1:
            raise ValueError("Column %d: Bad columnLength %r" % (colx, clen))
        if info.skipColumn:
            unpack_fmt += str(clen) + "x"
        else:
            unpack_fmt += str(clen) + "s"
            if info.hasSignage:
                sign_checks.append(start)
        start += clen
    expected_len = start
    unpack = struct.Struct(unpack_fmt).unpack

    good = []
    bad = []
    for line_num, line in enumerate(self.whatever_the_list_of_lines_is, 1):
        if len(line) != expected_len:
            bad.append((line_num, line, "bad length"))
            continue
        if not all(line[i] in '+-' for i in sign_checks):
            bad.append((line_num, line, "sign check failed"))
            continue
        good.append(unpack(line))

    return good, bad

ORIGINAL ANSWER TEXT: This answer should be a lot faster if the self.Columns() information is identical over all the records. We do the processing of the self.Columns() information one time, and build a couple of lists that contain just what we need to process a record.

This code shows how to compute parsedList but doesn't actually yield it up or return it or do anything with it. Obviously you would need to change that.

def parse_records(self):
    cols = self.Columns()

    slices = []
    sign_checks = []
    start = 0
    for info in cols:
        if info.columnLength < 1:
            raise ValueError, "bad columnLength"
        end = start + info.columnLength
        if not info.skipColumn:
            tup = (start, end)
            slices.append(tup)   
            if info.hasSignage:
                sign_checks.append(start)

    expected_len = end # or use (end - 1) to not count a newline

    try:
        for line in self.whatever_the_list_of_lines_is:
            if len(line) != expected_len:
                raise ValueError, "wrong length"
            if not all(line[i] in '+-' for i in sign_checks):
                raise ValueError, "wrong input"
            parsedLine = [line[s:e] for s, e in slices]

    except ValueError:
        parsedLine = False
share|improve this answer
1  
That's what I meant in my commentary edits, very nice, and 'info.hasSignage' must be indented 4 spaces. bbekdemir is having a Royal treatment on his first post... –  Remi Sep 2 '11 at 19:43
    
great catch @Remi –  bbekdemir Sep 2 '11 at 20:47
    
And thanks everyone for your responses - especially @steveha. I am amazed by how quickly I got answers. –  bbekdemir Sep 2 '11 at 20:48
    
You're welcome! :-) –  steveha Sep 2 '11 at 22:19
1  
I just added a note, suggesting that perhaps the best answer would be to take the @John Machin answer and modify it to write bad input lines to a file while yielding up the successfully parsed records. That would allow for parsing all input records even in the face of errors, and wouldn't require large lists. –  steveha Sep 5 '11 at 6:50
def fubarise(data):
    try:
        if nasty(data):
            raise ValueError("Look, Ma, I'm doing a big fat GOTO ...") # sheesh #1
        more_of_the_same()
        parsed_line = data
    except ValueError:
        parsed_line = False
        # so it can be a "data" or False -- sheesh #2
    return parsed_line

There is no point in having different error messages in the raise statement; they are never seen. Sheesh #3.

Update: Here is a suggested improvement which uses struct.unpack to partition input lines rapidly. It also illustrates better exception handling, under the assumption that the writer of the code is also running it and stopping on the first error is acceptable. A robust implementation which logs all errors in all columns of all lines for a user audience is another matter. Note that typically the error checking for each column would be much more extensive e.g. checking for a leading sign but not checking whether the column contains a valid number seems a little odd.

import struct

def unpacked_records(self):
    cols = self.Columns()
    unpack_fmt = ""
    sign_checks = []
    start = 0
    for colx, info in enumerate(cols, 1):
        clen = info.columnLength
        if clen < 1:
            raise ValueError("Column %d: Bad columnLength %r" % (colx, clen))
        if info.skipColumn:
            unpack_fmt += str(clen) + "x"
        else:
            unpack_fmt += str(clen) + "s"
            if info.hasSignage:
                sign_checks.append(start)
        start += clen
    expected_len = start
    unpack = struct.Struct(unpack_fmt).unpack

    for linex, line in enumerate(self.whatever_the_list_of_lines_is, 1):
        if len(line) != expected_len:
            raise ValueError(
                "Line %d: Actual length %d, expected %d"
                % (linex, len(line), expected_len))
        if not all(line[i] in '+-' for i in sign_checks):
            raise ValueError("Line %d: At least one column fails sign check" % linex)
        yield unpack(line) # a tuple
share|improve this answer
1  
Wow, you really found ways to make your points in obnoxious ways. Is that how you make friends and influence people? This isn't an answer to his question at all, just a critique of his coding style, and made rather insulting just to minimize the chances he will actually pay attention to you. –  steveha Sep 4 '11 at 17:40
    
Thank you for actually answering his question. Because you are using a builtin module, this should be faster than my answer as well. –  steveha Sep 4 '11 at 23:55

what about (using some classes to have an executable example):

class Info(object):
    columnLength = 5
    hasSignage = True
    skipColumn = False

class Something(object):

    def Columns(self):
        return [Info()]*4

    def bottleneck(self):
        try:
            data = []
            start = 0
            end = 0
            line = '+this-is just a line for testing'
            for info in self.Columns():
                start = end
                collength = info.columnLength
                end = start + collength
                if info.skipColumn:  # start with this
                    continue

                elif collength == 0: 
                    raise ValueError('Wrong Input')

                slice = line[start:end] # only now slicing, because it
                                        # is probably most expensive part

                if len(slice) != collength: 
                    raise ValueError('Wrong Input')

                elif info.hasSignage and slice[0] not in '+-': # bit more compact
                    raise ValueError('Wrong Input')

                else:
                    data.append(slice)

            parsedLine = data
        except:
            parsedLine = False

Something().bottleneck()

edit: when length of slice is 0, slice[0] does not exist, so if collength == 0 has to be checked for first

edit2: You are using this bit of code for many many lines, but the column info does not change, right? That allows you, to

  • pre-calculate a list of start points of each colum (no more need to calculate start, end)
  • knowing start-end in advance, .Columns() only needs to return columns that are not skipped and have a columnlength >0 (or do you really need to raise an input for length==0 at each line??)
  • the manditory length of each line is known and equal or each line and can be checked before looping over the column infos

edit3: I wonder how you will know what data index belongs to which column if you use 'skipColumn'...

share|improve this answer
    
+1, I was in the process of suggesting moving the skipColumn check up and simplifying the signage check myself. –  Russell Borogove Sep 2 '11 at 19:00

Don't compute start and end every time through this loop.

Compute them exactly once prior to using self.Columns() (Whatever that is. If 'Columns` is class with static values, that's silly. If it's a function with a name that begins with a capital letter, that's confusing.)

if slice == '' or len(slice) != info.columnLength can only happen if line is too short compared to the total size required by Columns. Check once, outside the loop.

slice[0:1].strip() != '+' sure looks like .startswith().

if not info.skipColumn. Apply this filter before even starting the loop. Remove these from self.Columns().

share|improve this answer
2  
Sorry, don't agree about start and end. Those are being used to take a different slice out of the input string each time; they depend on info.columnLength. Also, the check of info.columnLength makes sense if you are worried about possible garbage .columnLength values; I think the correction there is to try to handle it with an exception rather than inline code (ETAFTGP). Completely agree about .startswith(); and .startswith() should be called with a tuple argument of ('+', '-'). –  steveha Sep 2 '11 at 18:41
    
But wait... he says he is processing many lines at a time, and it's possible that the self.Columns() value is constant over all the lines. In which case, we could save a lot of time by precomputing a set of (start, end) tuples. If that is what you meant, I withdraw my disagreement. –  steveha Sep 2 '11 at 19:17
2  
@steveha: "and it's possible that the self.Columns() value is constant over all the lines". Not "possible". Generally, it's essential. That's what fixed -- positional -- file formats depend on. Fixed positions in each row. –  S.Lott Sep 2 '11 at 20:33
    
I started off just looking at what the code is actually doing, and making no assumptions otherwise. Tunnel vision on the code itself. Then I took a step back and said, "hmm, he says he is processing records." –  steveha Sep 2 '11 at 22:16

First thing I would consider is slice = line[start:end]. Slicing creates new instances; you could try to avoid explicitly constructing line [start:end] and examine its contents manually.

Why are you doing slice[0:1]? This should yield a subsequence containing a single item of slice (shouldn't it?), thus it can probably be checked more efficiently.

share|improve this answer

I want to tell you to use some sort of built-in Python feature to split the string, but I can't think of one. So I'm left with just trying to reduce the amount of code you have.

When we are done, end should be pointing at the end of the string; if this is the case, then all of the .columnLength values must have been okay. (Unless one was negative or something!)

Since this has a reference to self it must be a snip from a member function. So, instead of raising exceptions, you could just return False to exit the function early and return an error flag. But I like the debugging potential of changing the except clause to not catch the exception anymore, and getting a stack trace letting you identify where the problem came from.

@Remi used slice[0] in '+-' where I used slice.startswith(('+', '-)). I think I like @Remi's code better there, but I left mine unchanged just to show you a different way. The .startswith() way will work for strings longer than length 1, but since this is only a string of length 1 the terse solution works.

try:
    line = line.strip('\n')
    data = []
    start = 0
    for info in self.Columns():
        end = start + info.columnLength
        slice = line[start:end]
        if info.hasSignage and not slice.startswith(('+', '-')):
            raise ValueError, "wrong input"
        if not info.skipColumn:
            data.append(slice)
        start = end

    if end - 1 != len(line):
        raise ValueError, "bad .columnLength"

    parsedLine = data

except ValueError:
    parsedLine = False
share|improve this answer

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