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I have a complex problem, I don't know whether I can describe it properly or not.

I have two dimensional array of objects of a class. Currently my algorithm operates only on this two dimensional array but only some of the locations of that array are occupied. (almost 40%)

It works fine for small data set but if I have large data set (large number of elements of that 2d array e.g. 10000) then the program becomes memory exhaustive. Because I have nested loops that make 10000 * 10000 = 100000000 iterations.

Can I replace the 2 d array with Hashtable or some other data structure? My main aim is to reduce the number of iterations only by changing the data structure.

Pardon me for not explaining properly. I am developing using C#

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What about using break conditions in the loops? –  Matten Sep 2 '11 at 18:54
1  
It would help if you included an overview of your logic, i.e. what is going on in your loop –  havardhu Sep 2 '11 at 18:54
    
Why are you using a 2D array in the first place? What are you modeling with this array? Would a sparse matrix work? How does the algorithm decide which elements to operate on? Do you actually *need to store n^2 elements in the 2D array? –  Matt Ball Sep 2 '11 at 18:55

4 Answers 4

Sounds like the data structure you have is a sparse matrix and I'm going to point you to Are there any storage optimized Sparse Matrix implementations in C#?

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I'm conflicted on this. It sounds like the OP needs to store a large number of elements no matter what - it's just that this particular algorithm only needs to work with a subset of the elements. –  Matt Ball Sep 2 '11 at 18:58

You can create a key for a dictionary from the array coordinates. Something like:

int key = x * 46000 + y;

(This naturally works for coordinates resembling an array up to 46000x46000, which is about what you can fit in an int. If you need to represent a larger array, you would use a long value as key.)

With the key you can store and retreive the object in a Dictionary<int, YourClass>. Storing and retrieving values from the dictionary is quite fast, not much slower than using an array.

You can iterate the items in the dictionary, but you won't get them in a predictable order, i.e. not the same as looping the x and y coordinates of an array.

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arrays give multiple features:

  • A way of organizing data as a list of elements
  • A way to access the data elements by index number (1st, 2nd, 3rd etc)

But a common downside (depends on the language and runtime) is that arrays are often work poorly as a sparse data structure--if you don't need all of the array elements then you end up with wasted memory space.

So, yes, a hashtable will usually save space over an array.

But You asked My main aim is to reduce the number of iterations only by changing the data structure. In order to answer that question, we need to know more about your algorithm--what you're doing in each loop of your program.

For example, there are many ways to sort an array or a matrix. The different algorithms for sorting use differing numbers of iterations.

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If you need high performance you can roll down your own data structure. If the objects can be contained in only one container and not moved to other containers, you can do a custom hashset like data structure.

You add X, Y and Next fields into your class. You make a singly linked list of your object stored in an array that is your hash table. This can be very very fast.

I wrote it from scratch, there may be bugs. Clear, and rehash are not implemented, this is a demonstration only. Complexity of all operation is averaged O(1).

To make easy to enumerate on all nodes skipping empty nodes, there is a doubly linked list. Complexity of insertion and removal from a doubly linked list is O(1), and you will be able to enumerate all nodes skipping unused nodes, so the complexity for enumerating all nodes is O(n) where n is the number of nodes, not the "virtual" size of this sparse matrix.

Using a doubly linked list you can enumerate items in the same order as you insert it. The order is unrelated to X and Y coordinates.

public class Node
{
    internal NodeTable pContainer;
    internal Node pTableNext;
    internal int pX;
    internal int pY;
    internal Node pLinkedListPrev;
    internal Node pLinkedListNext;
}

public class NodeTable :
    IEnumerable<Node>
{
    private Node[] pTable;
    private Node pLinkedListFirst;
    private Node pLinkedListLast;

    // Capacity must be a prime number great enough as much items you want to store.
    // You can make this dynamic too but need some more work (rehashing and prime number computation).
    public NodeTable(int capacity)
    {
        this.pTable = new Node[capacity];
    }

    public int GetHashCode(int x, int y)
    {
        return (x + y * 104729); // Must be a prime number
    }

    public Node Get(int x, int y)
    {
        int bucket = (GetHashCode(x, y) & 0x7FFFFFFF) % this.pTable.Length;
        for (Node current = this.pTable[bucket]; current != null; current = current.pTableNext)
        {
            if (current.pX == x && current.pY == y)
                return current;
        }
        return null;
    }

    public IEnumerator<Node> GetEnumerator()
    {
        // Replace yield with a custom struct Enumerator to optimize performances.
        for (Node node = this.pLinkedListFirst, next; node != null; node = next)
        {
            next = node.pLinkedListNext;
            yield return node;
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public bool Set(int x, int y, Node node)
    {
        if (node == null || node.pContainer != null)
        {
            int bucket = (GetHashCode(x, y) & 0x7FFFFFFF) % this.pTable.Length;

            for (Node current = this.pTable[bucket], prev = null; current != null; current = current.pTableNext)
            {
                if (current.pX == x && current.pY == y)
                {
                    this.fRemoveFromLinkedList(current);

                    if (node == null)
                    {
                        // Remove from table linked list

                        if (prev != null)
                            prev.pTableNext = current.pTableNext;
                        else
                            this.pTable[bucket] = current.pTableNext;
                        current.pTableNext = null;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // Replace old node from table linked list

                        node.pTableNext = current.pTableNext;
                        current.pTableNext = null;

                        if (prev != null)
                            prev.pTableNext = node;
                        else
                            this.pTable[bucket] = node;

                        node.pContainer = this;
                        node.pX = x;
                        node.pY = y;

                        this.fAddToLinkedList(node);
                    }

                    return true;
                }
                prev = current;
            }

            // New node.

            node.pContainer = this;
            node.pX = x;
            node.pY = y;

            // Add to table linked list

            node.pTableNext = this.pTable[bucket];
            this.pTable[bucket] = node;

            // Add to global linked list

            this.fAddToLinkedList(node);

            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    private void fRemoveFromLinkedList(Node node)
    {
        Node prev = node.pLinkedListPrev;
        Node next = node.pLinkedListNext;

        if (prev != null)
            prev.pLinkedListNext = next;
        else
            this.pLinkedListFirst = next;

        if (next != null)
            next.pLinkedListPrev = prev;
        else
            this.pLinkedListLast = prev;

        node.pLinkedListPrev = null;
        node.pLinkedListNext = null;
    }

    private void fAddToLinkedList(Node node)
    {
        node.pLinkedListPrev = this.pLinkedListLast;
        this.pLinkedListLast = node;
        if (this.pLinkedListFirst == null)
            this.pLinkedListFirst = node;
    }
}
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Can I request you to please elaborate this idea a little bit more, probably with the help of code or something. Thanks. –  user906763 Sep 2 '11 at 19:32
    
Thanks for all the people that gave me ideas and helped me out. I improved my code with the following point: - I do not initialize the 2 d array in the start. when any location is used (read/write), i first check it if its null i initialize it with "new PairDS()". This significantly improved the performance and now the algorithm brings the result for even 40K entries (initially only 4K cause out of memory exception). I am also now thinking to improve it by using List<PairDS>. Thanks once again. –  user906763 Sep 5 '11 at 13:51

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