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How can keep all the configuration file code out of my logic code using Settings (ApplicationSettingsBase) and Dependency Injection?

With configuration I mean a customer specific configuration file.

Do I really have to inject a configuration class everytime I need it or is there another pattern?

It would be great to get some sample code!

Samples:

Static Configuration:

public static class StaticConfiguration
{
    public static bool ShouldApplySpecialLogic { get; set; }
    public static string SupportedFileMask { get; set; }
}

public class ConsumerOfStaticConfiguration
{
    public void Process()
    {
        if (StaticConfiguration.ShouldApplySpecialLogic)
        {
            var strings = StaticConfiguration.SupportedFileMask.Split(',');
            foreach (var @string in strings)
            {

            }
        }
    }
}

Non static Configuration:

public interface IConfiguration
{
    bool ShouldApplySpecialLogic { get; set; }
    string SupportedFileMask { get; set; }
}

public class Configuration : IConfiguration
{
    public bool ShouldApplySpecialLogic { get; set; }
    public string SupportedFileMask { get; set; }
}

public class Consumer
{
    private readonly IConfiguration _configuration;

    public Consumer(IConfiguration configuration)
    {
        _configuration = configuration;
    }

    public void Process()
    {
        if (_configuration.ShouldApplySpecialLogic)
        {
            var strings = _configuration.SupportedFileMask.Split(',');
            foreach (var @string in strings)
            {

            }
        }
    }
}

Static Context with non static configuration:

public static class Context
{
    public static IConfiguration Configuration { get; set; }
}

public class ConsumerOfStaticContext
{
    public void Process()
    {
        if (Context.Configuration.ShouldApplySpecialLogic)
        {
            var strings = Context.Configuration.SupportedFileMask.Split(',');
            foreach (var @string in strings)
            {

            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
what you want is an Inversion of Control Container –  Nico Sep 2 '11 at 20:27
8  
@Nico what I want to get is an explanation of seperating logic code from configuration by using an inversion of control container. –  Rookian Sep 2 '11 at 20:29
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6 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The important part to realize is that configuration is only one among several sources of values that drive your application's behavior.

The second option (non-static configuration) is best because it enables you to completely decouple the consumer from the source of the configuration values. However, the interface isn't required, as configuration settings are normally best modeled as Value Objects.

If you still want to read the values from a configuration file, you can do that from the application's Composition Root. With StructureMap, it might looks something like this:

var config = (MyConfigurationSection)ConfigurationManager.GetSection("myConfig");

container.Configure(r => r
    .For<Consumer>()
    .Ctor<MyConfigurationSection>()
    .Is(config));
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1  
Seeman, using your approach would be cumbersome, because I have more than 100 different consumers. So for every consumer I have to configure my IoC registration, haven't I? –  Rookian Sep 4 '11 at 16:26
2  
Use a convention. With StructureMap, the entry point is the Scan method. –  Mark Seemann Sep 4 '11 at 16:31
    
thank you :) I will take a look and think about your approach. –  Rookian Sep 4 '11 at 18:04
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Configuration classes reduce cohension and increase coupling in the consumers. This is because there may be many settings that don't relate to the one or two needed by your class, yet in order to fulfill the dependency, your implementation of IConfiguration must supply values for all of the accessors, even the irrelevant ones.

It also couples your class to infrastructure knowledge: details like "these values are configured together" bleed out of the application configuration and into your classes, increasing the surface area affected by changes to unrelated systems.

The least complex, most flexible way to share configuration values is to use constructor injection of the values themselves, externalizing infrastructure concerns. However, in a comment on another answer, you indicate that you are scared of having a lot of constructor parameters, which is a valid concern.

The key point to recognize is that there is no difference between primitive and complex dependencies. Whether you depend on an integer or an interface, they are both things you don't know and must be told. From this perspective, IConfiguration makes as much sense as IDependencies. Large constructors indicate a class has too much responsibility regardless of whether the parameters are primitive or complex.

Consider treating int, string and bool like you would any other dependency. It will make your classes cleaner, more focused, more resistant to change, and easier to unit test.

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I think this is the best answer because it recognises that classes do not need to know about IConfiguration but just what their actual dependencies are. You may have cause one day to have two instances of a class configured different way. e.g. "How do the results differ if we use the co-confabulator algorithm prefered by some installations instead of the reverse-hindlebrook preferred by others?" –  WW. Sep 5 '11 at 12:30
1  
Did I get you right, that you would not use a complex type, but simple types like int, string and bool? If so what if you have 5 different configuration parameters and maybe 2 dependencies. This would bloat your constructor. Maybe one could use a specific complex type for each case where you need some configuration. Something like FileParserConfiguration, BootConfiguration, DatabaseConfiguration. I am still not sure what I should use :) –  Rookian Sep 5 '11 at 20:41
    
@Rookian: I would look at that situation as having 7 dependencies. As with any class that has a large number of dependencies, there is some refactoring that needs to happen to reduce the class's responsibility. Constructor bloat is a symptom of a class that does too much; it doesn't really have anything to do with primitive values. –  Bryan Watts Sep 5 '11 at 21:11
1  
@Rookian: Put another way: grouping constructor values under an IConfiguration type may reduce the number of constructor parameters but it doesn't reduce complexity, which is the true danger behind constructor bloat. –  Bryan Watts Sep 5 '11 at 21:13
    
I agree with you having a lot of many dependencies is a signal of violating SRP. But it is also a bad practice to use simple types instead of a complex type. Simple types are bad in changeability. And I think having complex cohesive types can make things easier to understand. So grouping things into classes makes things more understandable. –  Rookian Sep 5 '11 at 21:23
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I wrote a blog post explaining how and why we use StructureMap to keep our configuration separate from our logic: http://lostechies.com/joshuaflanagan/2009/07/13/how-we-handle-application-configuration/

The functionality described in that post is now available in the FubuCore utility library (you can get it via nuget): https://github.com/DarthFubuMVC/fubucore/tree/master/src/FubuCore/Configuration

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One way is to inject a configuration interface like you post. Here are a couple other ways.

Exposing a Setter

class Consumer
{
    public bool ShouldApplySpecialLogic { get; set; }

    ...
}

In the composition root, you can read a config file or hardcode it. Autofac example:

builder.RegisterType<Consumer>().AsSelf()
    .OnActivated(e => e.Instance.ShouldApplySpecialLogic = true);

This is probably only advisable when you have a good default

Constructor Injection

public class Server
{
    public Server(int portToListenOn) { ... }
}

In the composition root:

builder.Register(c => new Server(12345)).AsSelf();
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I am scared about having a lot of constructor parameters when using constructor injection. Setter injection would avoid this, but then there is an additional new approach of getting dependencies and I think this would make it more complicated (mixing constructor and setter injection. –  Rookian Sep 4 '11 at 9:53
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In my applications I do what you have done above with IoC. That is to say, having my IoC container (StructureMap also) inject an IApplicationSettings into my classes.

For example, in an ASP.NET MVC3 project it may look like:

Public Class MyController
    Inherits Controller

    ...
    Private ReadOnly mApplicationSettings As IApplicationSettings

    Public Sub New(..., applicationSettings As IApplicationSettings)
        ...
        Me.mApplicationSettings = applicationSettings
    End Sub

    Public Function SomeAction(custId As Guid) As ActionResult
         ...

         ' Look up setting for custId
         ' If not found fall back on default like
         viewModel.SomeProperty = Me.mApplicationSettings.SomeDefaultValue

         Return View("...", viewModel)
    End Function
End Class

My implementation of IApplicationSettings pulls most things from the app's .config file and has a few hard-coded values in there as well.

My example wasn't logic flow-control (like your example), but it would have worked just the same if it was.

The other way to do this would be to do a service-locator type pattern, where you ask your Dependency Injection container to get you an instance of the configuration class on-the-fly. Service-Location is considered an anti-pattern generally, but might still be of use to you.

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What do you think about "Static Context with non static configuration"? –  Rookian Sep 4 '11 at 10:13
    
@Rookian Seems like a testable solution as well, and completely avoids DI. It might not be as "flexible" as needed. With DI, your IoC Container can provide different implementations for different classes (if needed); where as using the static route you are pretty much locked into one implementation of the configuration. Might not be a problem in your situation, just thought I would mention it. –  ckittel Sep 4 '11 at 16:06
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The best way to do this would be to take advantage of object oriented principles and the ability to bind to different implementations based on configuration:

public interface IFoo
{
    void Process();
}

public class NormalFoo : IFoo
{
    public virtual void Process() 
    {
    }
}

public class FileMaskCollection { IEnumerable<string> Masks {get;set;} }

public class FooThatAppliesSpecialLogic : NormalFoo
{
    private FileMaskCollection _masks;
    public FooThatAppliesSpecialLogic(FileMaskCollection masks)
    {
        _masks = masks
    }
    public override void Process()
    {
        foreach (var @string in _masks.Masks)
        {

        }

        base.Process();
    }
}

Then just use your DI configuration file to determine whether IFoo gets bound to a NormalFoo or a FooThatAppliesSpecialLogic. If you are binding to a FooThatAppliesSpecialLogic, your configuration file should also arrange to have the MaskCollection injected.

// Ninject-style binding code that may not actually compile, for the sake of example

if (_configuration.ShouldApplySpecialLogic)
{
    var strings = _configuration.SupportedFileMask.Split(',');
    var masks = new MaskCollection{Masks = strings};
    Bind<IFoo>.To<FooThatAppliesSpecialLogic>()
        .WithConstructorParameter("masks", masks);
}
else
{
    Bind<IFoo>.To<NormalFoo>();
}

This is a very effective way to keep configuration-based logic outside of your code. Only the DI binding config file or code will be concerned with any configuration settings.

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