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In C++ I have code like this.

    static UInt32 rol(UInt32 value, UInt32 bits)
    {
        bits &= 31;
        return ((value << bits) | (value >> (32 - bits)));
    }

    static UInt32 ror(UInt32 value, UInt32 bits)
    {
        bits &= 31;
        return ((value >> bits) | (value << (32 - bits)));
    }

how would it look in C#? I think the same exact way.. only problem

Error 2 Operator '>>' cannot be applied to operands of type 'uint' and 'uint'
Error 3 Operator '>>' cannot be applied to operands of type 'uint' and 'uint'
Error 1 Operator '<<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'uint' and 'uint'
Error 4 Operator '<<' cannot be applied to operands of type 'uint' and 'uint'

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For the record: best-practices for expressing rotates in a compiler-friendly way, avoiding C undefined behaviour: stackoverflow.com/questions/776508/…. When bits == 0, this code will shift the 32b value by 32bits. Hopefully that's legal in C#. – Peter Cordes Aug 17 '15 at 17:40
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should use int type for the right side variable in shift operators.

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wouldn't that mess with bits &= 31; logic though? must I create another variable after that? if I just change UInt32 bits to int bits fixes everything but will that bits AND 31 logic ever mess up? – SSpoke Sep 2 '11 at 21:22
    
You can replace bits &= 31 by bits %= 32. – oxilumin Sep 2 '11 at 21:27
    
Why the use of Contract? is that to surpass exceptions? I cannot find that library in my .NET framework. – SSpoke Sep 2 '11 at 21:29
    
It's just a way to write if then throw expression in one string, plus - you have static checking with code contracts library. You can learn about it at microsoft site – oxilumin Sep 2 '11 at 21:30
    
@SSpoke: no, the result of var &= 31; isn't affected by signedness. Signedness changes the meaning of the MSB only. – Ben Voigt Sep 2 '11 at 21:51

You will have to cast the right side of the bitshift operator to int. If you cast like (int)(32 - bits), it should not affect your intended purpose. The right side is just expecting an int, probably because it's simpler that way and highly unlikely you'll ever want to shift more than 2 billion bits.

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ya screw it I picked your solution.. easier fix.. return ((value << (int)bits) | (value >> (int)(32 - bits))); and return ((value >> (int)bits) | (value << (int)(32 - bits))); – SSpoke Sep 2 '11 at 21:32

The right operand must be always type int.

 int x << int bits
 uint x << int bits
 long x << int bits
 ulong x << int bits
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