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I got a list of dictionaries and want that to be sorted by a value of that dictionary.

This

[{'name':'Homer', 'age':39}, {'name':'Bart', 'age':10}]

sorted by name, should become

[{'name':'Bart', 'age':10}, {'name':'Homer', 'age':39}]
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12 Answers 12

up vote 582 down vote accepted

It may look cleaner using a key instead a cmp:

newlist = sorted(list_to_be_sorted, key=lambda k: k['name']) 

or as J.F.Sebastian and others suggested,

from operator import itemgetter
newlist = sorted(list_to_be_sorted, key=itemgetter('name')) 
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6  
Using key is not only cleaner but more effecient too. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 16 '08 at 15:03
20  
lambda k: k['name'] could be replaced by operator.itemgetter('name'). –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 16 '08 at 15:05
5  
What would you change to make it sort descending? –  NealWalters Oct 13 '09 at 4:14
2  
The fastest way would be to add a newlist.reverse() statement. Otherwise you can define a comparison like cmp=lambda x,y: - cmp(x['name'],y['name']). –  Mario Fernandez Oct 13 '09 at 7:14
141  
To sort descending: newlist = sorted(l, key=itemgetter('name'), reverse=True) –  fitzgeraldsteele Nov 24 '09 at 21:57

Lets Say I h'v a Dictionary D with elements below. To sort just use key argument in sorted to pass custom function as below

D = {'eggs': 3, 'ham': 1, 'spam': 2}

def get_count(tuple):
    return tuple[1]

sorted(D.items(), key = get_count, reverse=True)
or
sorted(D.items(), key = lambda x: x[1], reverse=True)  avoiding get_count function call

https://wiki.python.org/moin/HowTo/Sorting/#Key_Functions

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Using Schwartzian transform from Perl,

py = [{'name':'Homer', 'age':39}, {'name':'Bart', 'age':10}]

do

sort_on = "name"
decorated = [(dict_[sort_on], dict_) for dict_ in py]
decorated.sort()
result = [dict_ for (key, dict_) in decorated]

gives

>>> result
[{'age': 10, 'name': 'Bart'}, {'age': 39, 'name': 'Homer'}]

More on Perl Schwartzian transform

In computer science, the Schwartzian transform is a Perl programming idiom used to improve the efficiency of sorting a list of items. This idiom is appropriate for comparison-based sorting when the ordering is actually based on the ordering of a certain property (the key) of the elements, where computing that property is an intensive operation that should be performed a minimal number of times. The Schwartzian Transform is notable in that it does not use named temporary arrays.

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import operator

To sort the list of dictionaries by key='name':

list_of_dicts.sort(key=operator.itemgetter('name'))

To sort the list of dictionaries by key='age':

list_of_dicts.sort(key=operator.itemgetter('age'))
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3  
Anyway to combine name and age ? (like in SQL ORDER BY name,age ?) –  monojohnny Feb 17 '10 at 13:10
1  
what is the advantage of itemgetter over lambda ? –  njzk2 May 29 '13 at 13:29
5  
@monojohnny: yes, just have the key return a tuple, key=lambda k: (k['name'], k['age']). (or key=itemgetter('name', 'age')). tuple's cmp will compare each element in turn. it's bloody brilliant. –  Claudiu Sep 4 '13 at 22:21
    
In the documentation (docs.python.org/2/tutorial/datastructures.html) the optional key argument for list.sort() is not described. Any idea where to find that? –  TTT Feb 21 at 15:21
my_list = [{'name':'Homer', 'age':39}, {'name':'Bart', 'age':10}]

my_list.sort(lambda x,y : cmp(x['name'], y['name']))

my_list will now be what you want.

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If you want to sort the list by multiple keys you can do the following:

my_list = [{'name':'Homer', 'age':39}, {'name':'Milhouse', 'age':10}, {'name':'Bart', 'age':10} ]
sortedlist = sorted(my_list , key=lambda elem: "%02d %s" % (elem['age'], elem['name']))

It is rather hackish, since it relies on converting the values into a single string representation for comparison, but it works as expected for numbers including negative ones (although you will need to format your string appropriately with zero paddings if you are using numbers)

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sorted using timsort which is stable, you can call sorted several times to have a sort on several criteria –  njzk2 May 29 '13 at 13:41
    
njzk2's comment wasn't immediately clear to me so I found the following. You can just sort twice as njzk2 suggests, or pass multiple arguments to operator.itemgetter in the top answer. Link: stackoverflow.com/questions/5212870/… –  user724375 Aug 23 '13 at 21:05
3  
No need to convert to string. Just return a tuple as the key. –  Winston Ewert Dec 15 '13 at 4:55

I tried something like this:

my_list.sort(key=lambda x: x['name'])

It worked for integers as well.

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Here is my answer to a related question on sorting by multiple columns. It also works for the degenerate case where the number of columns is only one.

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You could use a custom comparison function, or you could pass in a function that calculates a custom sort key. That's usually more efficient as the key is only calculated once per item, while the comparison function would be called many more times.

You could do it this way:

def mykey(adict): return adict['name']
x = [{'name': 'Homer', 'age': 39}, {'name': 'Bart', 'age':10}]
sorted(x, key=mykey)

But the standard library contains a generic routine for getting items of arbitrary objects: itemgetter. So try this instead:

from operator import itemgetter
x = [{'name': 'Homer', 'age': 39}, {'name': 'Bart', 'age':10}]
sorted(x, key=itemgetter('name'))
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import operator
a_list_of_dicts.sort(key=operator.itemgetter('name'))

'key' is used to sort by an arbitrary value and 'itemgetter' sets that value to each item's 'name' attribute.

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I guess you've meant:

[{'name':'Homer', 'age':39}, {'name':'Bart', 'age':10}]

This would be sorted like this:

sorted(l,cmp=lambda x,y: cmp(x['name'],y['name']))
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You have to implement your own comparison function that will compare the dictionaries by values of name keys. See Sorting Mini-HOW TO from PythonInfo Wiki

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protected by Martijn Pieters Jun 11 at 16:04

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