Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I unwind an angle to result in an angle in [0, 360)?
I can do this:

int unwind(int angle)
{
    while(angle < 0) angle += 360;
    while(angle >= 360) angle -= 360;
}

But I'm pretty sure there is a way to do this without loops. I also tried angle % 360 but that doesn't work for negative angles (-60 % 360 == -60).

share|improve this question
2  
Can't you just add 360 to the result of angle % 360 if it is negative? –  Nicolas Grebille Sep 3 '11 at 0:05
1  
Use the fmod() function. –  Hans Passant Sep 3 '11 at 0:06
    
Hans: Why would you use a floating point function on integers? –  Kerrek SB Sep 3 '11 at 0:11
    
@Hans: fmod still suffers from the same issue –  Lie Ryan Sep 3 '11 at 0:49
    
Whoa, why is an angle an integer? Never mind. –  Hans Passant Sep 3 '11 at 1:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Try:

(360 + (angle % 360)) % 360

or:

(angle >= 0 ? 0 : 360) + angle % 360
share|improve this answer
    
nitpick: for -360, the second version evaluates to 360 –  Tom Sirgedas Sep 3 '11 at 0:23
    
@Tom Sirgedas: hmm, good catch... –  Lie Ryan Sep 3 '11 at 0:38
    
Since the result of % isn't predictable (at least in C++98), why not just compute it and do one more check? angle %= 360; while (angle < 0) angle += 360; -- that'll do at most one extra addition. –  Kerrek SB Sep 3 '11 at 0:51
    
@Kerrek SB: that isn't an expression, therefore cannot be transformed into a macro and used inside another expression, which IMO is a deal breaker, at least for me. However, can you expand your comment about % isn't predictable? –  Lie Ryan Sep 3 '11 at 1:00
    
@Lie: I think it's implementation defined how modulo acts if either operand is negative. I also think that the behaviour was prescribed in C99, but I'm not sure. That said, you could make it an expression at the expense of putting the modulo in there twice: angle % 360 + (angle % 360 < 0 ? 360 : 0). –  Kerrek SB Sep 3 '11 at 1:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.