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In this program, I am reading "key.pc.db" file and printing its mid value.

#include <fstream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
using namespace std;
int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
        ifstream  fp;     
        int mval;
        int sizek;
        struct stat filek;
        int min, max, mid;
        if(stat("key.pc.db", &filek) ==0 )
             sizek=filek.st_size;
        sizek=sizek/sizeof(int);
        min=0;
        max=sizek-1;
        mid=(min+max)/2;    
        printf("mid %d ",mid);
        fp.open( "key.pc.db", ios::in | ios::binary ); 
        fp.seekg(mid, ios::beg);
        fp.read( (char *) &mval, (int) sizeof( int ) );
        printf("%d mval ", mval);
        getch();
        return 1;
}

In this program also I am reading the same file but I am storing the value of the file in an array and then printing the mid value. The mid index for both the program shows the same but the value comes out to be different. Why so?

#include <fstream>
#include <conio.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>
using namespace std;
int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
        ifstream  fp;     
        int index;
        int sizek;
        int kval;
        struct stat filek;
        int min, max, mid;
        int i=0;
        if(stat("key.pc.db", &filek) ==0 )
             sizek=filek.st_size;
        sizek=sizek/sizeof(int);
        int k[sizek];
        fp.open( "key.pc.db", ios::in | ios::binary );  
        fp.read( (char *) &kval, (int) sizeof( int ) );
        while( !fp.eof() ) 
         {
               k[i++]=kval;
               fp.read( (char *) &kval, (int) sizeof( int ) );
         }
        min=0;
        max=sizek-1;
        mid=(min+max)/2;
        printf(" index %d ", mid);
        printf(" kmid %d ", k[mid]);
        getch();
        return 1;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Side note: declaring all your variables at the top serves no purpose, and makes programs larger and more difficult to read. It also effectively double-initializes complex objects such as ifstream. – Marcelo Cantos Sep 3 '11 at 3:59
    
@Marcelo why double? and by not declaring at the top means, I should have done it directly while using them? – Ava Sep 3 '11 at 4:05
2  
ifstream has a non-trivial constructor that initialises it to a sensible state even when it has nothing open. Calling open "initialises" it again with a stream. You should simply declare and initialise it in one go: ifstream fp("key.pc.db", ...). – Marcelo Cantos Sep 3 '11 at 5:11
    
Thanks for that info! – Ava Sep 3 '11 at 5:13
1  
You're welcome. Naturally, the same goes for most of your variables, e.g.: int min = 0;. Following this practice consistently would also likely have prevented a bug in your code: sizek isn't properly initialised if stat fails, but you continue using it anyway. – Marcelo Cantos Sep 3 '11 at 5:16
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You're seeking to the wrong point in the file in the first case. You should be seeking to mid*sizeof(int) rather than mid.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh now I know what blunder I was doing. Thanks a lot, it worked. – Ava Sep 3 '11 at 5:12

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