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I'm going through Programming In Scala 2nd Edition by Odersky, Spoon, and Venners, and this example threw me for a loop since it seemed to go against what I thought was true about functional programming and immutability. In the example (and earlier in the book in Ch. 18), the authors claim that operations on an object can still be "purely functional" even when those operations might internally mutate the state of the object. The example, which is on p.442, Ch. 19, is this:

 class Queue[+T] private (
   private[this] var leading: List[T], 
   private[this] var trailing: List[T]
 ) {

   private def mirror() = 
     if (leading.isEmpty) {
       while (!trailing.isEmpty) {
         leading = trailing.head :: leading
         trailing = trailing.tail
       }
     }

   def head: T = { 
     mirror()
     leading.head 
   }

   def tail: Queue[T] = { 
     mirror()
     new Queue(leading.tail, trailing) 
   }

   def enqueue[U >: T](x: U) = 
     new Queue[U](leading, x :: trailing)
 }

The justification given is that, so long as it side effects are not visible to clients, something like this can be considered functional. I guess I can get behind that...I mean strictly speaking that's what defines a function. But admittedly (and I'm not really too savvy about what the JVM memory model guarantees), but aren't there potential problems with that in this code?

For instance, if two threads are running operations on this queue, which looks like this to start:

Leading: Nil
Trailing: List(1,2,3,4)

Isn't it possible that one thread could call head() getting to this point in mirror() before being descheduled:

private def mirror() = 
     if (leading.isEmpty) {
       while (!trailing.isEmpty) {
         leading = trailing.head :: leading
         > trailing = trailing.tail
       }
     }

At which point the queue looks like this:

Leading: List(1)
Trailing: List(1,2,3,4)

And when a second thread calls tail() while the first is not active, this would be returned:

Leading: Nil
Trailing: List(1,2,3,4)

Whereas if the first thread's head() call were to finish, this would be returned after a subsequent tail() call on that list:

Leading: List(2,3,4)
Trailing: Nil

I'm admittedly not great at this kind of stuff and concurrent programming is really mindbending for me, as I'm sure it is for a lot of people, I'm just curious what I'm missing here.

share|improve this question
    
I think you are correct. I guess you could say that the "functional feel" breaks down if it's being used by more than one thread. Are functional programs supposed to be seamlessly concurrent? I don't know. – Owen Sep 3 '11 at 4:56
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're correct: functional-looking code can be rendered non-functional when used by multiple threads if it uses internal state as part of its implementation. You can fix this by synchronizing every method that touches the mutable variables (i.e. with a synchronized block). Unfortunately, this is not ideal for performance, which is why in a threaded application functional implementations are often preferred.

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Okay cool, just wanted to make sure I wasn't crazy. With the concession that there might be little bit of nebulousness in these definitions, or at least not total agreement on what they mean...is it fair to actually call this "purely functional" or "immutable" as the authors do? It looks functional under the right conditions, but it certainly isn't immutable...I mean it mutates state pretty clearly, and the functional look breaks down with multiple threads. I ask because I'm thinking about writing the authors and don't want to look like a huge tool. – Chris K Sep 3 '11 at 15:46
    
@Chris K - I think it's fair to call it immutable, but it's also wise to warn about thread safety. Computers are inherently mutable devices; there's almost always a way to make an operation cause mutation or otherwise fail even if it's designed to look immutable. The question is really whether you're providing an interface that is designed to mutate state, and how fragile it is. Given that multithreading is not that unusual, this fragility is disappointing, but I'm not sure that calling it "not purely functional" is accurate. – Rex Kerr Sep 4 '11 at 3:11

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