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class MC {

    private String name;

    void methodA(MC mc){
        System.out.println(mc.name);
    }

}

Why am I able to access name variable in methodA? I am confused here, can someone please explain?

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marked as duplicate by starblue, AVD, Kevin Panko, Avanz, Final Contest Apr 17 at 2:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I suggest reading: ibm.com/developerworks/library/ws-tip-mem-visibility.html. –  Lior Ohana Sep 3 '11 at 6:10

3 Answers 3

You can access it because methodA is part of class MC. Every method in a class can access that class's private data members (in the current instance and in any other instance). Only other classes cannot. For example:

class MC {
    private String name;

    void methodA(MC mc){
        System.out.println(mc.name);
    }
}

class SomeOtherClass {
    void printMC(MC mc){
        System.out.println(mc.name);  //compiler error here
    }
}

Here is some official documentation on this topic: http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/accesscontrol.html

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Because private does not apply to the object, it applies to the class. If private applied to the object, then your intuition would be correct: MC.methodA would have access to this.name, but it would not have access to mc.name (where mc is some other MC object).

However, a subtle rule of visibility modifiers is that they control access for any code in that class to the members of the other objects of that same class. So all of the code in the MC class has access to the private name field of all objects of type MC. That is why MC.methodA has access to mc.name (the name of some other MC object) and not just its own name.

Edit: The relevant section of the Java Language Specification is 6.6.1 Determining Accessibility:

Otherwise, if the member or constructor is declared private, then access is permitted if and only if it occurs within the body of the top level class (§7.6) that encloses the declaration of the member or constructor.

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because you have accessed it from the scope it's private to.

your private implementations and data will be private to (and accessible in) the scope (e.g. class) they have been declared in.

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2  
I suspect the question is, why does "private" not restrict you to accessing the field only in this? –  Owen Sep 3 '11 at 6:11
1  
I don't think "scope" is the best concept to use to explain this. It's really better explained using "visibility", as in the official documentation. –  aroth Sep 3 '11 at 6:16

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