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I am trying to read a 12 digit number from a text file in to an array. I have been able to do this successfully if I place whitespace between each digit. for instance:

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

But when I remove the whitespace between the digits my program is no longer able to allocate the array from the text file. for instance:

111111111111

I am sure the answer is simple but I have been unable to find the solution to my exact problem anywhere. Below is my while loop that I use to allocate the array.

void int_class::allocate_array(std::ifstream& in, const char* file)
{
    //open file
    in.open(file);

    //read file in to array
    int i = 0;
    while( !in.eof())
    {
        in >> myarray[i];
        i++;
    }

    in.close();
}
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2  
what's the type of myarray? –  Mu Qiao Sep 3 '11 at 6:56
    
If you read into a std::string instead of a char array, the string will resize itself to fit the data you read. –  Bo Persson Sep 3 '11 at 7:00

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To read an array of chars, supposing there are no spaces or other delimiters, you can read the whole of it from input stream at once:

in >> myarray;

To create an array of integers, you can read the input char by char and fill the array in place:

char c;
int i = 0;
while( !in.eof())
{
   in >> c;
   myarray[ i++ ] = c - '0';
}

In this case there may be any quantity of spaces in any place, they will be ignored.

share|improve this answer
    
Assuming myarray is an array of chars and not ints –  user168715 Sep 3 '11 at 6:58
    
Yes, I supposed so, though it was unclear from question. –  Grigor Gevorgyan Sep 3 '11 at 7:01
    
Yeah, I'm just assuming that's why the OP's posted code isn't working. –  user168715 Sep 3 '11 at 7:03
    
Updated to satisfy this case ) –  Grigor Gevorgyan Sep 3 '11 at 7:05
1  
@ezdazuzena: it's an easy way to convert character digit to corresponding integer. (int)('0') will give ascii value of '0' symbol (namely 48), (int)('1') will give 49 etc., so to get the integer value you should subtract 48, or better '0' –  Grigor Gevorgyan Feb 27 '13 at 14:02

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