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I have the following code below:

public static void main(String args[])
{
start();
}

i get this error: Non-static method start() cannot be referenced from a static context.

How can i go about doing this?

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4  
May I suggest a beginner's book on Java? Or at least going through the tutorials available from Oracle? Your question indicates you really don't have a firm grasp on the most basic of concepts and either would really help. –  Brian Roach Sep 3 '11 at 11:05
    
How do you declare your start ()? –  Kit Ho Sep 3 '11 at 11:19

3 Answers 3

Create an instance of your class and call the start method of that instance. If your class is named Foo then use the following code in your main method:

    Foo f = new Foo();
    f.start();

Alternatively, make method start static, by declaring it as static.

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Hope this can help you..

public class testProgarm {

    private static void start() {
        System.out.println("Test");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        start();
    }

}

However, it is not a good practice to make a method static. You should instantiate a object and call a object's method instead. If your object does't have a state, or you need to implement a helper method, static is the way to go.

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1  
"However, it is not a good practice to make a method static." This really depends. If you don't have state, or you need to implement a helper method, static is the way to go. –  helpermethod Sep 7 '11 at 11:12
1  
@Oliver: Thanks and agree, put your answer in my answer as well –  Kit Ho Sep 7 '11 at 11:27

One approach would be to create an instance of another class within the main method, for example newClass and call the start() method within it.

newClass class = new newClass();
class.start();
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