Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The small demo below illustrates my problem:

// 1 - Define a global reference to classA
(function() {
    window.classA = new ClassA();
})();

// 2 - ClassA object definition
function ClassA() {
    this.test1 = function() {
        document.write('test1');
    };
}

// 3 - ClassA inherits Array and has a test function
ClassA.prototype = new Array;
ClassA.prototype.test2 = function() {
    document.write(this[0]);
}

// 4 - Test our ClassA
var c = new ClassA();
c.test1();
c.push('test2');
c.test2();

// 5 - Test our global ClassA
classA.test1();
classA.push('test2'); // doesn't work
classA.test2(); // doesn't work

Try it here: http://jsfiddle.net/SPSW4/

What is the proper way to define a global variable classA (ClassA instance)?

share|improve this question
    
you mean global as in static? did you consider reordering of your function calls? –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 3 '11 at 14:36
    
global variable (an instance of ClassA) –  Zyphrax Sep 3 '11 at 14:40
    
there are no classes in JavaScript and naming a function class makes no sense. This makes it very confusing to read. Please reconsider your naming convention ;) –  Caspar Kleijne Sep 3 '11 at 14:43
    
simply an example, please pay no attention to the names :) –  Zyphrax Sep 3 '11 at 14:49

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code appears to be binding the global classA variable before ClassA is fully defined. I believe you will have more luck if you do it like:

// 1 - define ClassA 
window.ClassA = function() {
    this.test1 = function() {
        document.write('test1');
    };
};
ClassA.prototype = new Array;
ClassA.prototype.test2 = function() {
    document.write(this[0]);
}

// 2 - Define a global reference to classA
window.classA = new ClassA();

// 3 - Test our ClassA
var c = new ClassA();
c.test1();
c.push('test2');
c.test2();

// 4 - Test our global ClassA
classA.test1();
classA.push('test2'); // doesn't work
classA.test2(); // doesn't work

Here's an example: http://jsfiddle.net/SPSW4/2/

share|improve this answer
    
Close but 'window.classA = new ClassA();' would have an influence on the order of my javascript right? –  Zyphrax Sep 3 '11 at 14:45
    
I'm not sure what you're asking, exactly. But window.classA = new ClassA(); just needs to occur after you are done configuring ClassA. –  aroth Sep 3 '11 at 14:55
    
Not exactly true, but mainly. As you see by my answer, only the prototypes need to come before the assignment. That is because prototype methods are applied to objects that use the new keyword. Since those methods aren't attached at the time of ... = new ClassA() the object doesn't see them. –  vol7ron Sep 3 '11 at 16:07
    
In my answer I did ClassA.prototype = Array.prototype;, but here you do ClassA.prototype = new Array;. Is there any diference? –  user912695 Sep 3 '11 at 20:44
1  
@Mario - I think the way you did it is better, or at least more closely following commonplace JavaScript coding conventions. I just kept the code that was being used in the original post, since it seemed to work anyways. Although if you just set ClassA.prototype = Array.prototype then won't adding a new method to ClassA also cause that new method to appear in Array? Perhaps using new Array avoids that issue? –  aroth Sep 4 '11 at 0:54

The correct approach would be to create the pseudo-sub-classed Array constructor within an immediately invoked function expression and then expose the result to an explicit global object.

(function( global ) {
    // Declare the ArrayLike constructor
    function ArrayLike() {
        var args = [].slice.call( arguments ), 
            length = args.length, i = 0;

        this.length = length;

        for ( ; i < length; i++ ) {
            this[ i ] = args[ i ];
        }
        return this;
    }
    // Define ArrayLike's prototype by creating a new Array instance
    ArrayLike.prototype = new Array();

    // Define your own proto method
    ArrayLike.prototype.firstChar = function() {
        var ret = [], 
            length = this.length, i = 0;

        for ( ; i < length; i++ ) {
            ret[ i ] = this[ i ][ 0 ];
        }
        return ret;
    };
    // Expose the ArrayLike constructor.
    global.ArrayLike = ArrayLike;
})( this );

var a = new ArrayLike( "alpha", "beta", "gamma" );

console.log( a.push("delta") ) // 4
console.log( a ); // ["alpha", "beta", "gamma", "delta"]
console.log( a.firstChar() ); // ["a", "b", "g", "d"]

See it live: http://jsfiddle.net/rwaldron/gLdkb/

share|improve this answer

swap

// 2 - ClassA object definition
function ClassA() {
    this.test1 = function() {
        document.write('test1');
    };
}

// 1 - Define a global reference to classA
(function() {
    window.classA = new ClassA();
})();

declaration before calling functions in JavaScript, it is a scripting language.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work when I try it in Fiddle, results in undefined –  Zyphrax Sep 3 '11 at 14:47
    
you're missing a semi-colon on test2 defintion - see my answer –  vol7ron Sep 3 '11 at 16:14

Try this:

// 2 - ClassA object definition
function ClassA() {
    this.test1 = function() {
        document.write('test1');
    };
}


// 3 - ClassA inherits Array and has a test function
ClassA.prototype = new Array;
ClassA.prototype.test2 = function() {
    document.write(this[0]);
}

// 4 - Test our ClassA
var c = new ClassA();
c.test1();
c.push('test2');
c.test2();

// 1 - Define a global reference to classA
window.classA = new ClassA();

// 5 - Test our global ClassA
classA.test1();
classA.push('test2');
classA.test2();

Actually there were two problems: 1. Creating object before declaring class 2. Creating object before extending class

share|improve this answer
    
Same as with aroth's solution, this would influence the order of the javascript files. The function call technique should prevent that... but how to put it all together. –  Zyphrax Sep 3 '11 at 14:48
    
If you have this happening in different files, then you should say so in your question. Regardless, the solution is still the same. You just have to do something that ensures that you don't try to call new ClassA() until after ClassA is fully defined. A reasonable way to do this is to move the window.classA = new ClassA(); part so that it is at the very end of the file that defines ClassA. –  aroth Sep 3 '11 at 15:03
    
If I understand you correctly Zyphrax you can do something like that at each of your files: if (typeof(classA) === 'undefined') window.classA = new ClassA();. Ugly but will work. –  Kamil Dziedzic Sep 3 '11 at 15:16

Define your class

ClassA = function()
{
    this.test1 = function()
    {
        document.write('test1');
    };
};

Then apply array prototype

ClassA.prototype = Array.prototype;

Then you can extend your class

ClassA.prototype.test2 = function()
{
    document.write(this[0]);
};

About the “global reference” part. In the first part of your code your are not making a reference, you are instancing a class which has not been defined yet at that point. There is no need to do that also. What is your point with that part?

share|improve this answer


  1. Move the class definition before the call.

    Note: The only thing that really needs to come first is the prototyping, since your code first assigns the class, but never sees the effect of the prototyping, which occurs later. Your class assignment should come after the prototypes.

  2. You're missing a ; after the test2() definition.


// Class Definition
function ClassA() {
   this.test1 = function() { document.write('foo'); };
}
   ClassA.prototype       = new Array();
   ClassA.prototype.test2 = function() { document.write(this[0]); };


// Init
(function() { 
   window.classA = new ClassA(); 
})();

// Method Calls
var c = new ClassA();
    c.test1();
    c.push('bar');
    c.test2();

classA.test1();
classA.push('bar');
classA.test2();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.