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My question boils down to : “Why not use exception (or error) handling for regular program flow?"

To avoid all standard-answers I could have Googled on, I will provide an example you all can attack at will.

C# and Java (and too many others) have with plenty of types some of ‘overflow’ behaviour I don’t like at all (e.g type.MaxValue + type.SmallestValue == type.MinValue for example : int.MaxValue + 1 == int.MinValue).

But, seen my vicious nature, I’ll add some insult to this injury by expanding this behaviour to, let’s say an Overridden DateTime type. (I know DateTime is sealed in .NET, but for the sake of this example, I’m using a pseudo language that is exactly like C#, except for the fact that DateTime isn’t sealed).

The overridden Add method:

/// <summary>
/// Increments this date with a timespan, but loops when
/// the maximum value for datetime is exceeded.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="ts">The timespan to (try to) add</param>
/// <returns>The Date, incremented with the given timespan. 
/// If DateTime.MaxValue is exceeded, the sum wil 'overflow' and 
/// continue from DateTime.MinValue. 
/// </returns>
public DateTime override Add(TimeSpan ts) 
{
    try
    {                
        return base.Add(ts);
    }
    catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException nb)
    {
        // calculate how much the MaxValue is exceeded
        // regular program flow
        TimeSpan saldo = ts - (base.MaxValue - this);
        return DateTime.MinValue.Add(saldo)                         
    }
    catch(Exception anyOther) 
    {
        // 'real' exception handling.
    }
}

Of course an if could solve this just as easy, but the fact remains that I just fail to see why you couldn’t use exceptions (logically that is, I can see that when performance is an issue that in certain cases exceptions should be avoided).

I think in many cases they are more clear than if-structures and don’t break any contract the method is making.

IMHO (In My Honest Opinion) the “Never use them for regular program flow” reaction everybody seems to have is not that well underbuild as the strength of that reaction can justify.

Or am I mistaken?

I've read other posts, dealing with all kind of special cases, but my point is there's nothing wrong with it if you are both:

  1. Clear
  2. Honour the contract of your method

Shoot me.

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Great question +1 –  MrTelly Apr 8 '09 at 10:28
    
+1 I feel the same way. Besides performance, the only good reason to avoid exceptions-for-control-flow is when caller code will be much more readable with return values. –  Iraimbilanja Apr 8 '09 at 10:42
    
is the: return -1 if something happened, return -2 if something else, etc... really more readable then exceptions? –  kender Apr 8 '09 at 11:21
    
It is sad that one gets negative reputation for telling the truth: That your example could not have been written with if statements. (This is not to say it is correct/complete.) –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 11:23
3  
I would argue, that throwing an exception might sometimes be your only option. I've for example a business component which initializes its internal state within its constructor by querying the database. There are times, when no appropriate data in the database is available. Throwing an exception within the constructor is the only way to effectively cancel the construction of the object. This is clearly stated in the contract (Javadoc in my case) of the class, so I've no problem that client code could (and should) catch that exception when creating the component and continue from there. –  Stefan Haberl Apr 17 '13 at 11:40

24 Answers 24

Exceptions are basically non-local goto statements with all the consequences of the latter. Using exceptions for flow control violates a principle of least astonishment, make programs hard to read (remember that programs are written for programmers first).

Moreover, this is not what compiler vendors expect. They expect exceptions to be thrown rarely, and they usually let the throw code be quite inefficient. Throwing exceptions is one of the most expensive operations in .NET.

However, some languages (notably Python) use exceptions as flow-control constructs. For example, iterators raise a StopIteration exception if there are no further items. Even standard language constructs (such as for) rely on this.

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5  
hey, exceptions are not astonishing! And you kinda contradict yourself when you say "it's a bad idea" and then go on to say "but it's a good idea in python". –  hasenj Apr 8 '09 at 10:51
25  
I never said that it's a good idea in Python. –  Anton Gogolev Apr 8 '09 at 10:54
4  
I'm still not convinced at all : 1) Effiency was besides the question, lots of non bacht programs couldn't care less (eg user interface) 2) Astonishing : like I said it's just astonishing cause it isn't used, but the question remains : why not use id in the first place? But, since this is the answer –  Peter Apr 11 '09 at 18:55
1  
If I remember correctly the iterating for statement in Java (for (foo : bar)) relies on exceptions as well to abort. There was no guarantee that hasNext() will be called and iirc it won't. –  Joey Apr 12 '09 at 8:20
1  
+1 Actually I'm glad you pointed out the distinction between Python and C#. I don't think it's a contradiction. Python is much more dynamic and the expectation of using exceptions in this way is baked into the language. It's also part of Python's EAFP culture. I don't know which approach is conceptually purer or more self-consistent, but I do like the idea of writing code that does what others expect it to do, which means different styles in different languages. –  mehaase Jul 2 '13 at 17:00

Have you ever tried to debug a program raising five exceptions per second in the normal course of operation ?

I have.

The program was quite complex (it was a distributed calculation server), and a slight modification at one side of the program could easily break something in a totally different place.

I wish I could just have launched the program and wait for exceptions to occur, but there were around 200 exceptions during the start-up in the normal course of operations

My point : if you use exceptions for normal situations, how do you locate unusual (ie exceptional) situations ?

Of course, there are other strong reasons not to use exceptions too much, especially performance-wise

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6  
Example : when I debug a .net program, I launch it from visual studio and I ask VS to break on all exceptions. If you rely on exceptions as an expected behaviour, I can't do that anymore (since it would break 5times/sec), and it's far more complicated to locate the problematic part of the code. –  Brann Apr 8 '09 at 11:01
21  
+1 for the bolded part. –  cwallenpoole Apr 8 '09 at 12:38
11  
+1 for pointing out you don't want to to create an exception haystack in which to find an actual exceptional needle. –  Grant Wagner Apr 8 '09 at 17:34
4  
don't get this answer at all, i think people misunderstand here It has nothing to do with debugging at all, but with design. This is circular reasoning in it's pures form i'm afraid. And your point is really besides the question like stated before –  Peter Apr 11 '09 at 18:42
3  
You can catch the expected exceptions for flow control AND catch the unexpected after the same try block, I don't see the problem to be honest. –  Peter Apr 11 '09 at 18:58

A first reaction to a lot of answers :

you're writing for the programmers and the principle of least astonishment

Of course! But an if just isnot more clear all the time.

It shouldn't be astonishing eg : divide (1/x) catch (divisionByZero) is more clear than any if to me (at Conrad and others) . The fact this kind of programming isn't expected is purely conventional, and indeed, still relevant. Maybe in my example an if would be clearer.

But DivisionByZero and FileNotFound for that matter are clearer than ifs.

Of course if it's less performant and needed a zillion time per sec, you should of course avoid it, but still i haven't read any good reason to avoid the overal design.

As far as the principle of least astonishment goes : there's a danger of circular reasoning here : suppose a whole community uses a bad design, this design will become expected! Therefore the principle cannot be a grail and should be concidered carefully.

exceptions for normal situations, how do you locate unusual (ie exceptional) situations ?

In many reactions sth. like this shines trough. Just catch them, no? Your method should be clear, well documented, and hounouring it's contract. I don't get that question I must admit.

Debugging on all exceptions : the same, that's just done sometimes because the design not to use exceptions is common. My question was : why is it common in the first place?

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My rule of thumb is:

  • If you can do anything to recover from an error, catch exceptions
  • If the error is a very common one (eg. user tried to log in with the wrong password), use returnvalues
  • If you can't do anything to recover from an error, leave it uncaught (Or catch it in your main-catcher to do some semi-graceful shutdown of the application)

The problem I see with exceptions is from a purely syntax point of view (I'm pretty sure the perfomance overhead is minimal). I don't like try-blocks all over the place.

Take this example:

try
{
   DoSomeMethod();  //Can throw Exception1
   DoSomeOtherMethod();  //Can throw Exception1 and Exception2
}
catch(Exception1)
{
   //Okay something messed up, but is it SomeMethod or SomeOtherMethod?
}

.. Another example could be when you need to assign something to a handle using a factory, and that factory could throw an exception:

Class1 myInstance;
try
{
   myInstance = Class1Factory.Build();
}
catch(SomeException)
{
   // Couldn't instantiate class, do something else..
}
myInstance.BestMethodEver();   // Will throw a compile-time error, saying that myInstance is uninitalized, which it potentially is.. :(

Soo, personally, I think you should keep exceptions for rare error-conditions (out of memory etc.) and use returnvalues (valueclasses, structs or enums) to do your error checking instead.

Hope I understood your question correct :)

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2  
re: Your second example - why not just put the call to BestMethodEver inside the try block, after Build? If Build() throws an exception, it will not be executed, and the compiler is happy. –  Blorgbeard Apr 8 '09 at 10:46
1  
Yup, that would probably be what you'll end up with, but consider a more complex example where the myInstance-type itself can throw exceptions.. And other isntances in the method scope can too. You'll end up with a lot of nested try/catch blocks :( –  cwap Apr 8 '09 at 11:06
    
You should do Exception translation (to an Exception type appropriate to the level of abstraction) in your catch block. FYI: "Multi-catch" is supposed to be going into Java 7. –  jasonnerothin Apr 8 '09 at 14:33
    
FYI: In C++, you can put multiple catches after a try to catch different exceptions. –  RobH Apr 8 '09 at 17:51
2  
For shrinkwrap software, you need to catch all exceptions. At least put up a dialog box that explains that the program needs to shut down, and here's something incomprehensible you can send in a bug report. –  David Thornley Apr 8 '09 at 17:55

How about performance? While load testing a .NET web app we topped out at 100 simulated users per web server until we fixed a commonly-occuring exception and that number increased to 500 users.

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The standard anwser is that exceptions are not regular and should be used in exceptional cases.

One reason, which is important to me, is that when I read a try-catch control structure in a software I maintain or debug, I try to find out why the original coder used an exception handling instead of an if-else structure. And I expect to find a good answer.

Remember that you write code not only for the computer but also for other coders. There is a semantic associated to an exception handler that you cannot throw away just because the machine doesn't mind.

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Before exceptions, in C, there were setjmp and longjmp that could be used to accomplish a similar unrolling of the stack frame.

Then the same construct was given a name: "Exception". And most of the answers rely on the meaning of this name to argue about its usage. It is intended to be used for exceptional conditions. That was never reflected in the original longjmp. There were just situations where you needed to break control flow across many stack frames.

Exceptions are slightly more general in that you can use them within the same stack frame too. This raises analogies with goto that I believe are wrong. Gotos are a tightly coupled pair (and so are setjmp and longjmp) Exceptions follow a loosely coupled publish/subscribe that is much cleaner!

The third source of confusion relates to whether they are checked or unchecked exceptions. Of course, unchecked exceptions seem particularly awful to use for control flow.

Checked exceptions however great for control flow, once you get over all the Victorian hangups and live a little.

My favorite usage is a sequence of throw new Success() in a long fragment of code that tries one thing after the other until it finds what it is looking for. Each thing -- each piece of logic -- may have arbritrary nesting so break's are out as also any kind of condition tests. The if-else pattern is brittle. If I edit out an else or mess up the syntax in some other way, then there is a hairy bug.

Using throw new Success() linearizes the code flow. I use locally defined Success classes -- checked of course -- so that if I forget to catch it the code won't compile. And I don't catch another method's Successes.

Sometimes my code checks for one thing after the other and only succeeds if everything is OK. In this case I have a similar linearization using throw new Failure().

Using a separate function messes with the natural level of compartmentalization. So the return solution is not optimal. I prefer to have a page or two of code in one place for cognitive reasons. I don't believe in ultra-finely divided code.

What JVMs or compilers do is less relevant to me unless there is a hotspot. I cannot believe there is any fundamental reason for compilers to not detect locally thrown and caught Exceptions and simply treat them as very efficient gotos at the machine code level.

As far as using them across functions for control flow -- i. e. for common cases rather than exceptional ones -- I cannot see how they would be less efficient than multiple break, condition tests, returns to wade through three stack frames as opposed to just restore the stack pointer.

I personally do not use the pattern across stack frames and I can see how it would require design sophistication to do so elegantly. But used sparingly it should be fine.

Lastly, regarding surprising virgin programmers, it is not a compelling reason. If you gently introduce them to the practice, they will learn to love it. I remember C++ used to surprise and scare the heck out of C programmers.

share|improve this answer
    
Using this pattern, most of my coarse functions have two little catches at the end -- one for Success and one for Failure and that's where the function wraps up things such as prepare the correct servlet response or prepare return values. Having a single place to do the wrap-up is nice. The return-pattern alternative would require two functions for every such function. An outer one to prepare the servlet response or other such actions, and an inner one to do the computation. PS: An English professor would probably suggest I use "astonishing" rather than "surprising" in the last para :-) –  necromancer Jul 12 '13 at 22:26

Josh Bloch deals with this topic extensively in Effective Java. His suggestions are illuminating and should apply to .Net as well (except for the details).

In particular, exceptions should be used for exceptional circumstances. The reasons for this are usability-related, mainly. For a given method to be maximally usable, its input and output conditions should be maximally constrained.

For example, the second method is easier to use than the first:

/**
 * Adds two positive numbers.
 *
 * @param addend1 greater than zero
 * @param addend2 greater than zero
 * @throws AdditionException if addend1 or addend2 is less than or equal to zero
 */
int addPositiveNumbers(int addend1, int addend2) throws AdditionException{
  if( addend1 <= 0 ){
     throw new AdditionException("addend1 is <= 0");
  }
  else if( addend2 <= 0 ){
     throw new AdditionException("addend2 is <= 0");
  }
  return addend1 + addend2;
}

/**
 * Adds two positive numbers.
 *
 * @param addend1 greater than zero
 * @param addend2 greater than zero
 */
public int addPositiveNumbers(int addend1, int addend2) {
  if( addend1 <= 0 ){
     throw new IllegalArgumentException("addend1 is <= 0");
  }
  else if( addend2 <= 0 ){
     throw new IllegalArgumentException("addend2 is <= 0");
  }
  return addend1 + addend2;
}

In either case, you need to check to make sure that the caller is using your API appropriately. But in the second case, you require it (implicitly). The soft Exceptions will still be thrown if the user didn't read the javadoc, but:

  1. You don't need to document it.
  2. You don't need to test for it (depending upon how aggresive your unit testing strategy is).
  3. You don't require the caller to handle three use cases.

The ground-level point is that Exceptions should not be used as return codes, largely because you've complicated not only YOUR API, but the caller's API as well.

Doing the right thing comes at a cost, of course. The cost is that everyone needs to understand that they need to read and follow the documentation. Hopefully that is the case anyway.

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I think that you can use Exceptions for flow control. There is, however, a flipside of this technique. Creating Exceptions is a costly thing, because they have to create a stack trace. So if you want to use Exceptions more often than for just signalling an exceptional situation you have to make sure that building the stack traces doesn't negatively influence your performance.

The best way to cut down the cost of creating exceptions is to override the fillInStackTrace() method like this:

public Throwable fillInStackTrace() { return this; }

Such an exception will have no stacktraces filled in.

share|improve this answer
    
The stacktrace also requires the caller to "know about" (i.e. have a dependency upon) all Throwables in the stack. This is a bad thing. Throw exceptions appropriate to the level of abstraction (ServiceExceptions in Services, DaoExceptions from Dao methods, etc). Just translate if necessary. –  jasonnerothin Apr 8 '09 at 14:36

I don't really see how you're controlling program flow in the code you cited. You'll never see another exception besides the ArgumentOutOfRange exception. (So your second catch clause will never be hit). All you're doing is using an extremely costly throw to mimic an if statement.

Also you aren't performing the more sinister of operations where you just throw an exception purely for it to be caught somewhere else to perform flow control. You're actually handling an exceptional case.

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Because the code is hard to read, you may have troubles debugging it, you will introduce new bugs when fixing bugs after a long time, it is more expensive in terms of resources and time, and it annoys you if you are debugging your code and the debugger halts on the occurence of every exception ;)

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Apart from the reasons stated, one reason not to use exceptions for flow control is that it can greatly complicate the debugging process.

For example, when I'm trying to track down a bug in VS I'll typically turn on "break on all exceptions". If you're using exceptions for flow control then I'm going to be breaking in the debugger on a regular basis and will have to keep ignoring these non-exceptional exceptions until I get to the real problem. This is likely to drive someone mad!!

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1  
I already handeld that one higer : Debugging on all exceptions : the same, that's just done because the design not to use exceptions is common. My question was : why is it common in the first place? –  Peter Apr 8 '09 at 18:24

But you won't always know what happens in the Method/s that you call. You won't know exactly where the exception was thrown. Without examining the exception object in greater detail....

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Lets assume you have a method that does some calculations. There are many input parameters it has to validate, then to return a number greater then 0.

Using return values to signal validation error, it's simple: if method returned a number lesser then 0, an error occured. How to tell then which parameter didn't validate?

I remember from my C days a lot of functions returned error codes like this:

-1 - x lesser then MinX
-2 - x greater then MaxX
-3 - y lesser then MinY

etc.

Is it really less readable then throwing and catching an exception?

share|improve this answer
    
that's why they invented enums :) But magical numbers is a completely different topic.. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Isak Savo Apr 8 '09 at 12:16
    
Great example. I was about to write the same thing. @IsakSavo: Enums aren't helpful in this situation if the method is expected to return some meaning value or object. E.g. getAccountBalance() should return a Money object, not an AccountBalanceResultEnum object. A lot of C programs have a similar pattern where one sentinel value (0 or null) represents an error, and then you have to call another function to get a separate error code in order to determine why the error occurred. (The MySQL C API is like this.) –  mehaase Jul 2 '13 at 17:09

Typically there is nothing wrong, per se, with handling an exception at a low level. An exception IS a valid message that provides a lot of detail for why an operation cannot be performed. And if you can handle it, you ought to.

In general if you know there is a high probability of failure that you can check for... you should do the check... i.e. if(obj != null) obj.method()

In your case, i'm not familiar enough with the C# library to know if date time has an easy way to check whether a timestamp is out of bounds. If it does, just call if(.isvalid(ts)) otherwise your code is basically fine.

So, basically it comes down to whichever way creates cleaner code... if the operation to guard against an expected exception is more complex than just handling the exception; than you have my permission to handle the exception instead of creating complex guards everywhere.

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Add'l point: If your Exception provides failure capture information (a getter like "Param getWhatParamMessedMeUp()"), it can help the user of your API make a good decision about what to do next. Otherwise, you're just giving a name to an error state. –  jasonnerothin Apr 8 '09 at 14:40

If you are using exception handlers for control flow, you are being too general and lazy. As someone else mentioned, you know something happened if you are handling processing in the handler, but what exactly? Essentially you are using the exception for an else statement, if you are using it for control flow.

If you don't know what possible state could occur, then you can use an exception handler for unexpected states, for example when you have to use a third-party library, or you have to catch everything in the UI to show a nice error message and log the exception.

However, if you do know what might go wrong, and you don't put an if statement or something to check for it, then you are just being lazy. Allowing the exception handler to be the catch-all for stuff you know could happen is lazy, and it will come back to haunt you later, because you will be trying to fix a situation in your exception handler based on a possibly false assumption.

If you put logic in your exception handler to determine what exactly happened, then you would be quite stupid for not putting that logic inside the try block.

Exception handlers are the last resort, for when you run out of ideas/ways to stop something from going wrong, or things are beyond your ability to control. Like, the server is down and times out and you can't prevent that exception from being thrown.

Finally, having all the checks done up front shows what you know or expect will occur and makes it explicit. Code should be clear in intent. What would you rather read?

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1  
Not true at all : " Essentially you are using the exception for an else statement, if you are using it for control flow. " If you use it for control flow, you know what you catch exactly and never use a general catch, but a specific one of course! –  Peter Apr 8 '09 at 16:05

You might be interested in having a look at Common Lisp's condition system which is a sort of generalization of exceptions done right. Because you can unwind the stack or not in a controlled way, you get "restarts" as well, which are extremely handy.

This doesn't have anything much to do with best practices in other languages, but it shows you what can be done with some design thought in (roughly) the direction you are thinking of.

Of course there are still performance considerations if you're bouncing up and down the stack like a yo-yo, but it's a much more general idea than "oh crap, lets bail" kind of approach that most catch/throw exception systems embody.

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You can use a hammer's claw to turn a screw, just like you can use exceptions for control flow. That doesn't mean it is the intended usage of the feature. The if statement expresses conditions, whose intended usage is controlling flow.

If you are using a feature in an unintended way while choosing to not use the feature designed for that purpose, there will be an associated cost. In this case, clarity and performance suffer for no real added value. What does using exceptions buy you over the widely-accepted if statement?

Said another way: just because you can doesn't mean you should.

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Are you saying that there is no need for exception, after we have got if for normal use or use of execptions is not intended because it is not intended (circular argument)? –  Val Sep 2 '13 at 19:16
    
@Val: Exceptions are for exceptional situations - if we detect enough to throw an exception and handle it, we have enough information to not throw it and still handle it. We can go straight to the handling logic and skip the expensive, superfluous try/catch. –  Bryan Watts Sep 2 '13 at 20:20

One aesthetic reason:

A try always comes with a catch, whereas an if doesn't have to come with an else.

if (PerformCheckSucceeded())
   DoSomething();

With try/catch, it becomes much more verbose.

try
{
   PerformCheckSucceeded();
   DoSomething();
}
catch
{
}

That's 6 lines of code too many.

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Since you formulated a hypothesis you should also cite corroborating evidence/reasons. Name one reason why your code is superior to a much shorter, self-documenting if statement.

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1  
Things are not always that simple. It could be that one had to perform a lot of computation in order to make sure that an exception will not be thrown. The same computation will be made a second time, to make things worse. And, if it is a checked exception, you'll have to catch it anyway. –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 10:50
    
OK, omit checked exceptions for a second, they are another matter; if the validity computation is expensive/difficult, why not abstract it in another method that gets called appropriately, and preferrably only once. Anyway, I'm not contesting the claim itself; I am contesting this particular example –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 8 '09 at 11:59
    
(cont’d) and the onus is not on me to disprove an assertion I haven’t even made. It’s the other way round. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 8 '09 at 12:00
    
In this example, an IF is absolutely out of question. How is the client supposed to know whether an overflow will happen? This would mean he'd need detailed knowledge of the implementation of Date, TimeSpan and so on. –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 13:24
    
But the code is not on the client side. It's inside the class' implementation (or rather, a derived class; here, the base class would have to offer an appropriate check method, as I've already mentioned). To repeat: I don't contest the validity of exceptions for flow control, only of the argument. –  Konrad Rudolph Apr 8 '09 at 14:00

I feel that there is nothing wrong with your example. On the contrary, it would be a sin to ignore the exception thrown by the called function.

In the JVM, throwing an exception is not that expensive, only creating the exception with new xyzException(...), because the latter involves a stack walk. So if you have some exceptions created in advance, you may throw them many times without costs. Of course, this way you can't pass data along with the exception, but I think that is a bad thing to do anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, this is plain wrong, Brann. It depends on the condition. It's not always the case that the condition is trivial. Thus, an if statement could take hours, or days or even longer. –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 11:12
    
In the JVM, that is. Not more expensive than a return. Go figure. But the question is, what would you write in the if statement, if not the very code that is already present in the called function to tell an exceptional case from a normal one --- thus code duplication. –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 11:20
    
In this situation, I like the .net Double.TryParse approach. no code duplication, but no exceptions either. –  Brann Apr 8 '09 at 11:25
    
So you advocate writing for each method xxx() (that could throw an exception) one accompagnying tryXxx() that does not, instead of try { xxx() ; } catch {}? –  Ingo Apr 8 '09 at 11:34
    
no, that's not what I mean. I use double.TryParse only when I think an error can occur in the normal course operations (typically, when the data I'm Parsing has been input by the user. I advocate using exceptions only for exception situations. –  Brann Apr 8 '09 at 11:37

I don't think there is anything wrong with using Exceptions for flow-control. Exceptions are somewhat similar to continuations and in statically typed languages, Exceptions are more powerful than continuations, so, if you need continuations but your language doesn't have them, you can use Exceptions to implement them.

Well, actually, if you need continuations and your language doesn't have them, you chose the wrong language and you should rather be using a different one. But sometimes you don't have a choice: client-side web programming is the prime example – there's just no way to get around JavaScript.

An example: Microsoft Volta is a project to allow writing web applications in straight-forward .NET, and let the framework take care of figuring out which bits need to run where. One consequence of this is that Volta needs to be able to compile CIL to JavaScript, so that you can run code on the client. However, there is a problem: .NET has multithreading, JavaScript doesn't. So, Volta implements continuations in JavaScript using JavaScript Exceptions, then implements .NET Threads using those continuations. That way, Volta applications that use threads can be compiled to run in an unmodified browser – no Silverlight needed.

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There are a few general mechanisms via which a language could allow for a method to exit without returning a value and unwind to the next "catch" block:

  • Have the method examine the stack frame to determine the call site, and use the metadata for the call site to find either information about a try block within the calling method, or the location where the calling method stored the address of its caller; in the latter situation, examine metadata for the caller's caller to determine in the same fashion as the immediate caller, repeating until one finds a try block or the stack is empty. This approach adds very little overhead to the no-exception case (it does preclude some optimizations) but is expensive when an exception occurs.

  • Have the method return a "hidden" flag which distinguishes a normal return from an exception, and have the caller check that flag and branch to an "exception" routine if it's set. This routine adds 1-2 instructions to the no-exception case, but relatively little overhead when an exception occurs.

  • Have the caller place exception-handling information or code at a fixed address relative to the stacked return address. For example, with the ARM, instead of using the instruction "BL subroutine", one could use the sequence:

        adr lr,next_instr
        b subroutine
        b handle_exception
    next_instr:
    

To exit normally, the subroutine would simply do bx lr or pop {pc}; in case of an abnormal exit, the subroutine would either subtract 4 from LR before performing the return or use sub lr,#4,pc (depending upon the ARM variation, execution mode, etc.) This approach will malfunction very badly if the caller is not designed to accommodate it.

A language or framework which uses checked exceptions might benefit from having those handled with a mechanism like #2 or #3 above, while unchecked exceptions are handled using #1. Although the implementation of checked exceptions in Java is rather nuisancesome, they would not be a bad concept if there were a means by which a call site could say, essentially, "This method is declared as throwing XX, but I don't expect it ever to do so; if it does, rethrow as an "unchecked" exception. In a framework where checked exceptions were handled in such fashion, they could be an effective means of flow control for things like parsing methods which in some contexts may have a high likelihood of failure, but where failure should return fundamentally different information than success. I'm unaware of any frameworks that use such a pattern, however. Instead, the more common pattern is to use the first approach above (minimal cost for the no-exception case, but high cost when exceptions are thrown) for all exceptions.

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Because SEH is expensive.

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SEH isn't expensive at all since it essentialy describes a pttern. Catching an exception is where the expense comes in as the runtime has to do a lot of work to walk/unwind the stack, etc. –  Scott Dorman Apr 8 '09 at 14:35

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