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I have a code that will be tested:

public void ackAlert(final Long alertId, final String comment) {
    final AnyTask task = AnyTask.create(
            "ackAlert", new Class[] { Long.class, String.class },
            new Object[] { alertId, comment });
    taskExecutor.execute(task);
}

I'm writting test to it:

 public void testAckAlert() throws Exception {

  final Long alertId = 1L;
  final String comment = "tested";

  final AnyTask task = AnyTask.create(
    "ackAlert", new Class[] { Long.class, String.class },
    new Object[] { alertId, comment });

  taskExecutor.execute(task);
  expectLastCall();

  replay(taskExecutor);

  testingObjectInstance.ackAlert(alertId, comment);

  verify(taskExecutor);

 }

And I got exception:

java.lang.AssertionError: Unexpected method call execute(com.alert.bundle.model.AnyTask@4cbfea1d): execute(com.alert.bundle.model.AnyTask@65b4fad5): expected: 1, actual: 0

Where is my error? I think problem is in invocation of static method create.

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Surely there's an isolation/mocking framework for Java that does not require the antiquated record/replay syntax? –  TrueWill Sep 3 '11 at 15:20
    
Really? Which one you suggest? –  CHEM_Eugene Sep 3 '11 at 15:27
    
I don't have a suggestion in the Java arena; I'm a C# developer. Often the Java open source tools are more mature, so this surprised me. I was hoping a Java expert could suggest a different library. –  TrueWill Sep 4 '11 at 1:15
2  
Mockito (mockito.org) would be an example. That is not your problem here, though. The error is in testing the equivalence of your AnyTask objects (see below). –  jhericks Sep 4 '11 at 4:18
2  
+100 for Mockito. Everyone should move to it post-haste. @TrueWill: this is the framework that overcame the record/replay paradigm in Java. –  Ryan Stewart Sep 4 '11 at 4:24

2 Answers 2

It may not be important to mock your static method, depending on what it is that you want to test. The error is because it does not see the task that gets created in the method you are testing as equal to the task you passed to the mock.

You could implement equals and hashCode on AnyTask so that that they do look equivalent. You could also 'capture' the task being passed to execute and verify something about it after the test. That would look like this:

public void testAckAlert() throws Exception {

  final Long alertId = 1L;
  final String comment = "tested";
  mockStatic(AnyTask.class);

  Capture<AnyTask> capturedTask = new Capture<AnyTask>();

  taskExecutor.execute(capture(capturedTask));
  expectLastCall();

  replay(taskExecutor);

  testingObjectInstance.ackAlert(alertId, comment);

  AnyTask actualTask = capturedTask.getValue();
  assertEquals(actualTask.getName(), "ackAlert");
  verify(taskExecutor);

}

If you are not really testing anything about the task, but just that the taskExecutor.execute() is called, you could simply replace

taskExecutor.execute(task);

with

taskExecutor.execute(isA(AnyTask.class));

or even

taskExecutor.execute(anyObject(AnyTask.class));
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I don't see where you're creating your mocks, but yes, mocking a static method call can't be done with EasyMock alone. However, PowerMock can be used with either EasyMock or Mockito to mock a static method call.

You will need to annotate your test class with @RunWith(PowerMockRunner.class) and @PrepareForTest(AnyTask.class). Then your test would look something like this:

public void testAckAlert() throws Exception {

  final Long alertId = 1L;
  final String comment = "tested";
  mockStatic(AnyTask.class);

  final AnyTask task = new AnyTask();
  expect(AnyTask.create(
    "ackAlert", new Class[] { Long.class, String.class },
    new Object[] { alertId, comment })).andReturn(task);

  taskExecutor.execute(task);
  expectLastCall();

  replay(AnyTask.class, taskExecutor);

  testingObjectInstance.ackAlert(alertId, comment);

  verify(taskExecutor);

}
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