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If I wanna provide a free guestbook service via php+mysql,I have two choices,

  1. store all message in one database
  2. create a table for each free user.

If I have registered 1000 users and 100000 message,

A table have 1500MB VS 1000 tables are 0-3M each ,

which one is faster? and why ? Or better idea?

thanks

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Faster for what? Better for what? –  Mat Sep 3 '11 at 15:46
    
System Optimization. –  danky pang Sep 3 '11 at 15:54
2  
"System optimization" doesn't mean anything. The best schema strategy depends on how you use the tables, which you're not explaining. (Although a schema with a variable number of tables (other than temporaries) is quite often a sign of bad design). –  Mat Sep 3 '11 at 15:58

1 Answer 1

One table 1500MB will definitely be better in space & organisation. Because each table creates aditional space overhead.

In short, go with one table. That's the only valid solution. MySQL and other DBMSs are not made for such abuse you want to perform.

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+1 just make sure that the table is indexed correctly. It's best to have a table users with a primary key, say user_id, and another table messages with a primary key, message_id and a foreign key user_id –  Ben Sep 3 '11 at 15:50
    
Exactly, Ben. Thanks. –  Rok Kralj Sep 3 '11 at 15:51
    
So what if the table have 5GB and 500,000,000 rows? –  danky pang Sep 3 '11 at 15:59
    
Same. Doesn't change the situation. If you are going to split, you tables will use even more space. 5GB table is nothing special, I see it every day. –  Rok Kralj Sep 3 '11 at 16:02
    
Firstly they probably won't. Secondly it won't matter; that's what databases are for. messages will, as far as I can tell be only 2 or 3 columns, which will be very quick to scan. Our largest tables are around 90Gb and I access then in 0.01 s using the primary key. –  Ben Sep 3 '11 at 16:02

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