Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I'm trying to extend the functionality of some classes that I do not have access to.

Basically I'm trying to create a toString/toXML method for logging purposes. I thought of creating a singleton (essentially a map) to which I can register the different functions and have them globally available in a fashion, so I can have something like string Singleton::toString(void* or abstractObject*) which would pick the correct method from the map depending on the type.

While I can get type information with typeid, I want to be able to implement it for a base class and then have all derived classes use that method, unless I there is a 'closer' / more appropriate method.

Would that be possible, or should I change to a different method (can templates do that)? I can not access the classes in question unfortunately, as most of them are from 3rd party libraries.

share|improve this question
    
If they're in 3rd party libraries how would abstractObject* help you? Does abstractObject already exist as a type? – Flexo Sep 3 '11 at 16:18
    
Most libraries derive from (each their own) base object. I would much prefer a general solution, but if splitting it by library/base object makes it possible, it might be a feasible, albeit ugly solution. – Darcara Sep 3 '11 at 16:24
    
Most classes (even 3rd party) are serialize via operator<<. Try using this and see if it prints itself to the stream. – Loki Astari Sep 3 '11 at 17:30
    
It's not about serialisation, but about creating a sensible output for logging. While most classes do have some toString methods or stream operators, they usually generate too much(serializing the object) or to little(only the name, or value) output for a debug log file. – Darcara Sep 3 '11 at 18:09

I have found that the following is a very simple way for me to keep track of the types of base and derived structures or classes that I define.

_kind does not have to be a string. In fact, it should probably be an enum. However, since I was designing a rather high level program when I came up with this, strings were fast enough for me.

struct base
{
protected:
    string _kind;
public:
    base()
    {
        _kind = "base";
    }

    ~base()
    {
    }

    string kind()
    {
        return _kind;
    }
}
struct derived : base
{
    derived()
    {
        _kind = "derived";
    }
    ~derived()
    {
    }
}

For built-in structures, perhaps overload the toString and toXML methods and let the compiler decide?

string toString(structure1 A)
{
...
}
string toString(structure2 A)
{
...
}

This might get a little confusing for derived structures, however I think the compiler will choose the leaf structure as the type instead of the base.

For example, if you have types A : B : C : D, and function f is defined for C and A. If you input a variable of type B, then it should be auto typecasted to A. If you input a variable of type C, then it will use the function for type C. If you input a variable of type D, then it should be auto typecasted to type C and then the C function should be called.

You might also try templates which essentially does the same thing.

template <class t>
string toString(t A)
{
...
}

Cheers, Ned

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.