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So I have the following enum and each state represents a string in a database table. In my methods which interact with the database and particularly the status field I'm simply passing a Status reference such as Status.NOTSTARTED or Status.RUNNING and then inside the methods body I use the toString() method to insert a particular state in the db. My question is if I have to reconstruct an object from the database how to work with the status enum. My initial idea is to take the status string from the database and then do something like:

if(string.equals("NOT-YET-STARTED")) { 
 //pass reference to Status.NOTSTARTED
} else if (string.equals("RUNNING")) { 
 //pass reference to Status.RUNNING
}

I was wondering if there is a clever way of doing this and avoid manual checking of the string value.

public enum Status {

NOTSTARTED {

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "NOT-YET-STARTED";
    }
},
RUNNING {

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "RUNNING";
    }
},
OK {

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "OK";
    }
},
FAIL {

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "FAIL";
    }
}, 
DISPATCHED {
    @Override
    public String toString() { 
        return "DISPATCHED";
    }
 }
}
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes you can use an enum constructor, couple with a value to get the value for that Enum Constant:

public enum Status {

private String value;

STATUS1("myStatus1"), STATUS2("myStatus2");

private Status(String value) {
    this.value = value;
}

public getValue() {
   return this.value;
}
}

So then you can do:

Status.STATUS1.getValue();
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This solves the enum-> db but for db-> enum i can have something like if StringFromDB.equals(Status.STATUS2.getValue()) {} - if I want StringFromDB to be STATUS2. Is that right? –  LordDoskias Sep 3 '11 at 16:46
1  
@LordDoskias Yes, that would work, the other option is to iterate thru the Enum values to find the right one, as suggested by Arnout Engelen. –  Oscar Gomez Sep 3 '11 at 16:56
    
@Oscar Gomez or use the valueOf() method already provided ... –  EJP Sep 4 '11 at 9:55
    
@EJP That would work but only if the constant name is exactly the String name, which may not be possile if the String does not follow the normal Java variable naming policies, such as no spaces. –  Oscar Gomez Sep 4 '11 at 16:03
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You can use

Status status = Status.valueOf(yourStringFromDB);

However the string must be the same as a name of your enum. Otherwise a java.lang.IllegalArgumentException is thrown.

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You probably mean: Enum.valueOf( Status.class, yourStringFromDB ). –  Alexander Pogrebnyak Sep 3 '11 at 17:18
    
Beside Enum.valueOf() there is also a method (for every enum) returning correct enum type without an explicit class parameter. –  Swato Sep 3 '11 at 17:45
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You might want to consider making the enum constants and the database strings match exactly - then you can simply use Enum.valueOf(). From that moment on of course you have to keep the enum and the database in sync, so you'd have to document this prominently.

If this is not an option, make the string representations a private field as suggested by Oscar and create a static function that loops through Status.values() and finds the matching element, like this:


    public static Status getStatus(String statusDatabaseName)
    {
        if (StringUtils.isBlank(statusDatabaseName))
        {
            return null;
        }
        for (Status status : Status.values())
        {
            if (statusDatabaseName.equals(status.getDatabaseName()))
            {
                return status;
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
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