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My table has 4 tags linked to the to each id. I want to select the position(rank) of that value(tag_name or tag_id) and the number of times the value(tag_name or tag_id) displays in that same position(rank).

Here's what it would look like in mysql:

> +--------+------------+--------+------+
> | id     | tag_name   | tag_id | rank |
> +--------+------------+--------+------+
> | 2345   | cookie     |    2   |   1  | 
> | 2345   | bar        |    1   |   2  |
> | 2345   | cereal     |    3   |   3  |
> | 2345   | milk       |    4   |   4  |
> | 2346   | cereal     |    3   |   1  |
> | 2346   | milk       |    4   |   2  |
> | 2346   | cookie     |    2   |   3  |
> | 2346   | hot dogs   |    5   |   4  |
> | 2347   | chocolate  |    6   |   1  | 
> | 2347   | bar        |    1   |   2  |
> +--------+------------+--------+------+

Here's what my current code looks like:

SELECT m.*, tr.tag_id, t.tag_name, @rownum:=@rownum + 1 AS rank 
FROM meals AS m
RIGHT JOIN tags_rel AS tr ON tr.meal_id = m.id 
JOIN tags AS t ON tr.tag_id = t.id
JOIN (SELECT @rownum:=0) AS r
ORDER BY m.id DESC

Please keep in mind that I'm actually using a pagination so my ORDER BY actually looks like this:

    ORDER BY id DESC LIMIT $start_from, 12

If I select either tag_name=bar or tag_id=1 and rank=2 I should get the bellow results. Plus I would like the count of rows returned for that value.

> +--------+------------+--------+------+
> | id     | tag_name   | tag_id | rank |
> +--------+------------+--------+------+
> | 2345   | bar        |    1   |   2  |
> | 2347   | bar        |    1   |   2  |  
> +--------+------------+--------+------+

Thanks!

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Please add expected result which query should return –  Kamil Dziedzic Sep 3 '11 at 16:46
    
@Kamil Dziedzic I've added an example above, thanks –  checkenginelight Sep 3 '11 at 16:57
    
adding a , or a . in your english would sure make it more readable. What do you want to achieve? –  Martin Sep 3 '11 at 17:07
    
@Martin thanks for your feedback. I will definitely try to make it as easy to read as possible. I have a gallery which I would like to populate from my tags with respect to each tag's rank. –  checkenginelight Sep 3 '11 at 17:31
    
rank, is that the number of times that a single name appears in the result of the select and the 2 joins? I recreated your database and have trouble to understand how to get to just 2 rows of output. –  Martin Sep 3 '11 at 18:08

2 Answers 2

how about this:

   SELECT DISTINCT meal_id as MealId, t2name as TagName, t2id as TagId, Rank
FROM 
  (SELECT t1id as t2id, t1name as t2name, rnk as rnk2, count(*) as Rank
    FROM 
    tags_rel AS r, 
    (SELECT m1id, t1id, t1name, 
      @rnk := CASE WHEN @id <> m1id THEN 1 ELSE @rnk + 1 END AS rnk, @id := m1id as idx
      FROM   
        tags_rel AS r, 
        (SELECT @id := 0) idx,
        (SELECT @rnk := 0) rxx,
        (SELECT m.id AS m1id, t.id AS t1id, name AS t1name
          FROM  tags_rel r
          JOIN (meals AS m, tags AS t ) ON ( m.id = r.meal_id AND t.id = r.tag_id )
        ) AS rn
      WHERE r.tag_id = t1id AND r.meal_id = m1id
      ORDER BY m1id, t1name
    ) AS rno
   WHERE r.tag_id = t1id AND r.meal_id = m1id
   group BY t1id, t1name, rnk
  ) as rn2
  join (meals, tags_rel) on (meals.id = tags_rel.meal_id and tags_rel.tag_id = t2id)
ORDER BY meal_id, t2id

which results in:

2345 bar      1 2
2345 cookie   2 1
2345 cereal   3 1
2345 milk     4 2
2346 cookie   2 1
2346 cereal   3 1
2346 milk     4 2
2346 hotdog   5 1
2347 bar      1 2
2347 chocolad 6 1
share|improve this answer
    
This is the result I get with your query after I changed the name to t.tag_name AS t1name. (Also rank shouldn't be pass 4) Thanks for your continued efforts! i.stack.imgur.com/YsUBD.png –  checkenginelight Sep 4 '11 at 16:32
    
I think you should try the selects from inside out and select * instead of naming some fields. First RN (selects all rows) then RNO (adds the rank of each name within meal) next RN2 (groups and counts). Find the query that is not correctly doing what you expect and let me know. I would not mind spending next weekend solving the problem. –  Martin Sep 4 '11 at 17:29
    
Also: you say rank should not exeed 4, but if you count thousands of records, the count of rank exceeds 4. I think you use RANK for 2 purposes: 1: the order, 2: the number of times it appears there –  Martin Sep 4 '11 at 17:35
    
Ah yes exactly! I will give it a shot thanks. –  checkenginelight Sep 4 '11 at 22:09
  SELECT tag_name, tag_id, rank, COUNT(tag_id) AS rankcount 
    FROM table 
GROUP BY tag_id, rank;

results in:

+-----------+--------+------+-----------+
| tag_name  | tag_id | rank | rankcount |
+-----------+--------+------+-----------+
| bar       |      1 |    2 |         2 |
| cookie    |      2 |    1 |         1 |
| cookie    |      2 |    3 |         1 |
| cereal    |      3 |    1 |         1 |
| cereal    |      3 |    3 |         1 |
| milk      |      4 |    2 |         1 |
| milk      |      4 |    4 |         1 |
| hot dogs  |      5 |    4 |         1 |
| chocolate |      6 |    1 |         1 |
+-----------+--------+------+-----------+
9 rows in set (0.00 sec)

If you want your original table enhanced by a count of lines (although that seems to be quite senseless, as every sql result returns the number of rows) you'll have to do a subquery:

SELECT id, tag_name, tag_id as t_id, rank, 
       (SELECT count(tag_id) FROM table WHERE tag_id = t_id) as subqueryCount
  FROM table;

+------+-----------+------+------+---------------+
| id   | tag_name  | t_id | rank | subqueryCount |
+------+-----------+------+------+---------------+
| 2345 | cookie    |    2 |    1 |             2 |
| 2345 | bar       |    1 |    2 |             2 |
| 2345 | cereal    |    3 |    3 |             2 |
| 2345 | milk      |    4 |    4 |             2 |
| 2346 | cereal    |    3 |    1 |             2 |
| 2346 | milk      |    4 |    2 |             2 |
| 2346 | cookie    |    2 |    3 |             2 |
| 2346 | hot dogs  |    5 |    4 |             1 |
| 2347 | chocolate |    6 |    1 |             1 |
| 2347 | bar       |    1 |    2 |             2 |
+------+-----------+------+------+---------------+
10 rows in set (0.00 sec)

Extending that query would result in your desired result, extended by a column where the count of rows is inserted (which is IMO still rather senseless).

SELECT id, tag_name, tag_id as t_id, rank, 
       (SELECT count(tag_id) FROM table WHERE tag_id = t_id) as subqueryCount
  FROM table
 WHERE tag_id = 1;

results in

+------+----------+------+------+---------------+
| id   | tag_name | t_id | rank | subqueryCount |
+------+----------+------+------+---------------+
| 2345 | bar      |    1 |    2 |             2 |
| 2347 | bar      |    1 |    2 |             2 |
+------+----------+------+------+---------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)
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